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Ray Eames

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NEWS
August 23, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Ray Eames, collaborator with her late husband in a design firm that produced innovative and philosophical statements in furniture, film, toys, museum shows and architecture, died Sunday. A part of the widely heralded "Office of Charles and Ray Eames," she was 73. She died at Cedars Sinai Medical Center of the complications of cancer on the same date her husband had died 10 years earlier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2013 | By Suzanne Muchnic
Surprisingly, little has changed at the Eames House since 1949, when Charles and Ray Eames designed their Pacific Palisades home and studio as a model of affordable modern living. Most of the objects they lived with remain in place at the two-part, rectangular structure on a bluff overlooking the ocean. Charles died in 1978; his wife and professional partner passed away 10 years later. But they are remembered for their creative use of materials and innovative design of architecture, furniture and industrial products.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2013 | By Suzanne Muchnic
Surprisingly, little has changed at the Eames House since 1949, when Charles and Ray Eames designed their Pacific Palisades home and studio as a model of affordable modern living. Most of the objects they lived with remain in place at the two-part, rectangular structure on a bluff overlooking the ocean. Charles died in 1978; his wife and professional partner passed away 10 years later. But they are remembered for their creative use of materials and innovative design of architecture, furniture and industrial products.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
It's kind of amazing when you think about it, all the things Charles and Ray Eames did. Known for work as diverse as the Eames chair and the short film “Powers of Ten,” they were architects, artists and designers of everything from graphics to toys to textiles, operating out of the Eames Office in Venice, as well as the Case Study house they built in Pacific Palisades in 1949. Their creations are marked by a unique mix of utility and play; “Take your pleasure seriously,” Charles observed.
MAGAZINE
June 25, 2000
JOHN NEUHART, with wife, Marilyn, exhibition and graphic designers and authors, with Ray Eames, of "Eames design" (Abrams) I was hired as a graphic designer in the summer of 1957 and was immediately put to work building the mechanical motion displays for the Alcoa solar energy toy, christened the "Do-Nothing Machine." (Part of a national ad campaign forecasting future uses of aluminum, the Eames Office contribution was one of many solicited from designers nationwide.
MAGAZINE
July 30, 2000
As someone who worked as a researcher and apprentice film editor at the Eames Office of Charles and Ray Eames, I greatly enjoyed reading "The Eames Team Remembers" (SoCal Style, June 25). The Eameses' lives were a seamless whole, with work, hobbies, family and a wide network of illustrious friends and clients wending their way through the Venice office. At lunchtime, Charles and Ray sometimes would become so enamored with the food that nothing could be eaten until it was photographed for the ever-growing photo library.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1999 | STANLEY MEISLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Except when they hid behind playful masks, designers Charles and Ray Eames usually posed for photographs in exuberant smiles, beaming with optimism. The pose was fitting. This husband-and-wife team, headquartered in Los Angeles, excited the world of design in the heady years after World War II when Americans looked ever upward and onward--before Vietnam and racial violence and the homeless gnawed at the nation's conscience and dampened good feelings.
NEWS
September 15, 1989
Remembering the agreeable afternoon spent with Leon Whiteson at the Eames House and reading the opening paragraphs of his article about it, I couldn't imagine where the misleading headline "New Life for Landmark Fixer-Upper" came from (Aug. 14). "New Life" disagreeably and falsely implies that earlier the house had been dead, whereas actually we celebrate the life with which Charles and Ray Eames infused the house from the start. From its construction, they maintained it beautifully.
NEWS
August 14, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
Nestled in a hidden grove of majestic eucalyptus trees on a Pacific Palisades hilltop is one of the most famous modern residences in the world. With its exposed black steel frame filled with red, white and blue panels that look like a walk-in version of a Mondrian painting, the brilliant high-tech Eames house is an icon of architectural modernism that has inspired several generations of architects and designers all over the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2000 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, Susan Freudenheim is The Times' arts writer
Imagine inheriting a legacy that helped define the look of the 20th century. Imagine owning a house known as one of the great masterpieces of Modernist architecture. Imagine being asked to keep alive the spirit of invention that engendered all of this. This is the responsibility that befell Lucia Eames and her offspring on Aug. 21, 1988, the day her stepmother, Ray Eames, died, 10 years to the day after the death of Lucia's father--Ray's design partner and husband--Charles Eames.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Evelyn Ackerman, a California artist and designer known for her highly regarded work across a range of media, including mosaics, tapestries and wood carvings, and for her creative collaboration of more than six decades with her husband, artist Jerome Ackerman, has died. She was 88. Ackerman died Wednesday at her home in Culver City of complications of old age, said her daughter, Laura Ackerman-Shaw. Originally from Detroit, Evelyn Ackerman was a prolific designer who, together with her husband, became part of the mid-century movement known as California modernism.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2012 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
A century-old red brick office complex in Venice that once housed the business of legendary furniture designers Charles and Ray Eames has been sold to New York investors who plan to improve the property. The husband-and-wife Eames team were among the most famous designers of the 20th century, creating popular modernist pieces, including a curvy leather-and-plywood lounger, that were widely embraced in the decades after World War II and are still sold today. DLJ Real Estate Capital Partners bought the building at 901 Abbot Kinney Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It's a chair we see first, a stunning Eames lounge chair, and that's as it should be. Because from the chairs came a cascade of furniture, and from that flood an international reputation for Charles and Ray Eames as perhaps the premier American designers of the 20th century. With the contents of the interior of the Eameses' breathtaking Pacific Palisades house on display at LACMA as the centerpiece of the museum's "Living In a Modern Way: California Design, 1930-1965" Pacific Standard Time exhibition, there couldn't be a better time to examine the complex and absorbing history of this designing couple, and "Eames: The Architect and the Painter" couldn't be a better vehicle for that examination.
HOME & GARDEN
September 24, 2011 | By David Hay, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Charles and Ray Eames nurtured a design imagination that knew few boundaries, stretching far and wide, but if you were to look for its center - its heart - you might have found it in the living room of their landmark Pacific Palisades house. With its 17-foot-high ceiling, panels of glass opening to the grove of eucalyptus outside, and a vast range of objects collected over a lifetime, the Eames House living room is where two of the most influential designers of the 20th century felt at ease.
NEWS
October 12, 2000 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Swaim, a private investigator from Mar Vista, was out and about, picking up 10 pieces of trash. Richard Zafran of Playa del Rey, a between-jobs university administrator, was scooping up dirt outside the Eames House in Pacific Palisades and sealing it in plastic bags to send to 10 friends worldwide. And at the Eames gallery on Main Street in Santa Monica, Eames Demetrios was scooping up handfuls of M&Ms from a bowl brimming with 10,000 of them.
MAGAZINE
July 30, 2000
As someone who worked as a researcher and apprentice film editor at the Eames Office of Charles and Ray Eames, I greatly enjoyed reading "The Eames Team Remembers" (SoCal Style, June 25). The Eameses' lives were a seamless whole, with work, hobbies, family and a wide network of illustrious friends and clients wending their way through the Venice office. At lunchtime, Charles and Ray sometimes would become so enamored with the food that nothing could be eaten until it was photographed for the ever-growing photo library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Evelyn Ackerman, a California artist and designer known for her highly regarded work across a range of media, including mosaics, tapestries and wood carvings, and for her creative collaboration of more than six decades with her husband, artist Jerome Ackerman, has died. She was 88. Ackerman died Wednesday at her home in Culver City of complications of old age, said her daughter, Laura Ackerman-Shaw. Originally from Detroit, Evelyn Ackerman was a prolific designer who, together with her husband, became part of the mid-century movement known as California modernism.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
It's kind of amazing when you think about it, all the things Charles and Ray Eames did. Known for work as diverse as the Eames chair and the short film “Powers of Ten,” they were architects, artists and designers of everything from graphics to toys to textiles, operating out of the Eames Office in Venice, as well as the Case Study house they built in Pacific Palisades in 1949. Their creations are marked by a unique mix of utility and play; “Take your pleasure seriously,” Charles observed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2000 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, Susan Freudenheim is The Times' arts writer
Imagine inheriting a legacy that helped define the look of the 20th century. Imagine owning a house known as one of the great masterpieces of Modernist architecture. Imagine being asked to keep alive the spirit of invention that engendered all of this. This is the responsibility that befell Lucia Eames and her offspring on Aug. 21, 1988, the day her stepmother, Ray Eames, died, 10 years to the day after the death of Lucia's father--Ray's design partner and husband--Charles Eames.
MAGAZINE
June 25, 2000 | BARBARA THORNBURG
THEIR GOAL WAS TO BUILD A BETTER SOCIETY, and that they did--countless homes and commercial spaces today are furnished with the sleek, vibrant designs of Charles and Ray Eames, the husband and wife who operated out of a former garage in Venice in the mid-20th century.
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