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February 6, 1995 | Associated Press
J.C. Snead tapped in a 2 1/2-foot par putt on the first hole of a playoff Sunday to defeat Ray Floyd and win the Royal Caribbean Classic. Snead, the 54-year-old nephew of golf legend Sam Snead, shot a six-under-par 65 for a 209 total to win $127,500, the richest payday of his career. Gallery favorite Robert Landers, the struggling cattle farmer from Azel, Texas, finished his senior tour debut with a 74 for a three-day total of 228.
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July 13, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Defending champion Ray Floyd, Larry Nelson, Tom Watson, Allen Doyle and Ed Dougherty shot five-under-par 67s and shared the first-round lead in the Senior Players Championship at Dearborn, Mich. Jay Sigel opened with a 68 on the TPC of Michigan. Japan's Isao Aoki, playing his 1,000th pro tournament, and U.S. Senior Open champion Bruce Fleisher were among the group of five at three under.
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SPORTS
March 28, 1992 | Associated Press
Ray Floyd, making his senior debut in Kurimotomachi, Japan, shot a seven-under-par 65 Friday to take a two-stroke lead after the first round of the Fuji Electric Grandslam. Floyd, 49, is not eligible to play on the Senior PGA Tour until he turns 50 in September. Gary Player, playing his first tournament in Japan in 18 years because of the easing of South Africa's apartheid policy, shot a 67 to share second place with Bob Reith of Canada. Arnold Palmer opened with a 72 and Lee Trevino shot a 73.
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July 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
After the pain went away, Ray Floyd realized he could still play. Floyd, who hadn't won in four years, birdied three of the last four holes to win his second Senior Players Championship title by one stroke when Dana Quigley bogeyed the last hole Sunday at Dearborn, Mich. "It's been four years, so this is very special," said Floyd, 57, whose last win came in this championship in 1996. "It's a major, so when I sit back and think about this, it's going to be tremendously satisfying."
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March 29, 1992 | Associated Press
Ray Floyd shot a six-under-par 66 Saturday to hold a two-stroke lead after two rounds of the Senior Grandslam Championship. Floyd has a 131 total after two trips over the 6,657-yard Oak Hills Country Club course. Floyd is not eligible for the PGA Senior Tour until he turns 50 in September. South African Gary Player, playing his first Japanese tournament in 18 years after the easing of his country's apartheid policy, matched Floyd's bogey-free 66 and was alone in second place.
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April 9, 1990 | MIKE DOWNEY
It has taken the British a couple of hundred years to strike back at the colonials, but they have bloody well done so, marching in formation across rolling green fields, sticks in hand, at the specific and extremely painful expense of a 47-year-old former U.S. Army brat name of Raymond Floyd.
SPORTS
March 13, 1992 | From Associated Press
Ray Floyd, 49, who last week became the oldest man in 17 years to win on the PGA Tour, made five consecutive birdies Thursday and tied for the first-round lead of the Honda Classic at Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. With a six-under-par 66 on the Weston Hills Country Club course, a new venue for this event, Floyd shared the top spot with Mike Donald and Keith Clearwater. Clearwater tied for second when Floyd scored his first victory in six years last Sunday.
SPORTS
March 13, 1988 | Associated Press
Ray Floyd climbed into the bunker with visions of a bogey--or worse--flashing through his mind. Then his eyes lit up. "I saw that the sand was raked up flush with the lip of the trap, so that there was no lip," Floyd said Saturday after the third round of the $700,000 Honda golf tournament. "I figured I had two options--use the sand wedge and try to play for a (bogey) four and I might make five, or go for the putter."
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June 16, 1986 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
If you liked Ray Floyd's smile after he won the U.S. Open Sunday at Shinnecock Hills, thank Chip Beck's father. He is Floyd's dentist. If you liked Chip Beck's stroke Sunday, when he shot a 65 to equal the course record and finish in a tie for second, thank Ray Floyd's father. He is the club pro who resurrected Beck's game two years ago. For these two pros from North Carolina, there has never been a more memorable Father's Day.
SPORTS
July 18, 1999 | From Associated Press
Ray Floyd won the Masters, the U.S. Open and the PGA Championship. Fred Gibson won something called the Tobago Open. Floyd's all-time winnings on the PGA Tour alone are more than $5 million. Gibson collected a whopping $704. Floyd still draws large galleries wherever he goes. Gibson is one of those players who send fans scrambling for their pairings sheet. For one day, though, the careers of the star and the journeyman pro are intertwined.
SPORTS
July 18, 1999 | From Associated Press
Ray Floyd won the Masters, the U.S. Open and the PGA Championship. Fred Gibson won something called the Tobago Open. Floyd's all-time winnings on the PGA Tour alone are more than $5 million. Gibson collected a whopping $704. Floyd still draws large galleries wherever he goes. Gibson is one of those players who send fans scrambling for their pairings sheet. For one day, though, the careers of the star and the journeyman pro are intertwined.
SPORTS
July 26, 1998 | JIM MURRAY
Giving Raymond Floyd a lead going into a final round is like sending rice to China, money to Switzerland, ice to Siberia. It's nice, but it's not necessary. Floyd on a golf course is like Johnny Longden on a horse. You can get to him. You can't get by him. He brings new meaning to the word front-runner. He could be caught by Dave Stockton, Hale Irwin or Isao Aoki three shots behind--but that may not be the way to bet. Floyd is a master at keeping a field in his rearview mirror.
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July 25, 1998 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What is the best way to attack the wily kikuyu? Actually, most methods come straight from the textbook. For instance, you can be gentle and try to coax the golf ball out of the kikuyu rough with kind words and half-hearted swings. Or you can follow the Raymond Floyd approach, which as far as kikuyu is concerned clearly borders on herbicide. Now, Floyd is such a subtle guy, his other car is probably a skip-loader, so you need to take this into consideration.
SPORTS
July 15, 1996 | From Associated Press
With wind kicking up and his closest rivals fading, Ray Floyd turned to basics in the Senior Players Championship on Sunday at Dearborn, Mich. "Nobody made a run at me early, so I just started playing conservatively," said Floyd, who shot a one-over-par 73 for a two-stroke victory over Hale Irwin. "I just aimed at the middle of the greens and tried to make some putts."
SPORTS
November 16, 1995 | Jim Murray
You would think, when you asked a champion golfer what the most memorable shot or victory was in his career, he would come up with the wedge shot that won the U.S. Open, the putt that earned him a Masters jacket or the five-iron across the Firth of Forth that locked up the British Open. Just as you might expect a ballplayer to recall the homer that won the pennant or the tennis player the ace that gave him Wimbledon. Raymond Floyd is one of the icons of golf. He has won two PGAs, a Masters, a U.
SPORTS
April 17, 1995 | From Associated Press
Ray Floyd slammed the door on any would-be challengers with a string of 14 consecutive pars in the PGA Seniors Championship, claiming the title he blew a year ago. "Last year has nothing to do with it," Floyd said Sunday after he turned a two-stroke lead into a five-shot victory and showed why he is one of golf's great front-runners.
SPORTS
July 15, 1996 | From Associated Press
With wind kicking up and his closest rivals fading, Ray Floyd turned to basics in the Senior Players Championship on Sunday at Dearborn, Mich. "Nobody made a run at me early, so I just started playing conservatively," said Floyd, who shot a one-over-par 73 for a two-stroke victory over Hale Irwin. "I just aimed at the middle of the greens and tried to make some putts."
SPORTS
November 17, 1991 | JIM MURRAY
Golfers call it "the zone." It is a state of suspended animation where you turn the controls of your game over to some mysterious instrument panel. You are barely conscious as you go through the motions and you keep making pars and birdies and eagles. You are a robot. Every move is on instinct, programmed by years and years of practice, tournament play, shots that suddenly flash in your personal computer put there by a lifetime of shot-after-shot storage of data.
SPORTS
April 16, 1995 | From Associated Press
Ray Floyd shot a five-under-par 67 and leads Jim Colbert by one stroke going into the final round of the PGA Seniors Championship, but Jack Nicklaus has Floyd's attention. "If Jack keeps hitting the ball the way he is, and keeps on putting, lo and behold, we're all in trouble," Floyd said after completing third-round play Saturday on the Champions course at the PGA Resort in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.
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