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Ray Fosse

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER PUMMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ray Fosse succeeded in becoming the first candidate to unseat an incumbent in the Oxnard Harbor District Commission's 53-year history and also outpolled the two commissioners that voters returned to office. "There might have been some magic in being first on the ballot," said Fosse, 52, a ship's pilot at the Naval Construction Battalion Center in Port Hueneme. "There were a lot of people who backed my campaign, and we walked a lot of precincts."
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OPINION
February 28, 2014 | By Kelly Candaele
In the bottom of the 12th inning during Major League Baseball's All-Star Game in 1970, a spectacular collision took place at home plate. The National League's Pete Rose smashed into American League catcher Ray Fosse, hurling him backward into the dirt. Rose scored the winning run, while Fosse suffered a career-threatening injury. It was one of the most exciting moments in All-Star history. In February, Major League Baseball announced an experimental one-year change - Rule 7.13 - designed to reduce the chances that either a catcher or runner would be injured in an "egregious" collision at home plate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Pete Rose is banned from Major League Baseball for gambling, but are networks that carry the national pastime prohibited from showing old footage of Charlie Hustle? That's what Fox's baseball commentator Tim McCarver told sports radio host Dan Patrick on Monday morning during an interview to promote the network's coverage of Tuesday night's All-Star game. "Major League Baseball does not like us showing video of Pete Rose on our air and from my understanding, ESPN's too," McCarver said.
SPORTS
December 13, 2013 | Mike Hiserman
Baseball as you knew it is changing. The major leagues, years after Little League did it, are expanding the use of instant replay and giving managers the ability to lodge challenges. And this week, a Major League Baseball rules committee announced plans to institute a rule banning head- or shoulder-first home plate collisions. That's right: No more Pete Rose crashing into Ray Fosse or Buster Posey being bowled over. Sandy Alderson, general manager of the New York Mets and chairman of the rules committee, said baserunners will not be allowed to knock over a catcher for the purpose of dislodging the ball.
SPORTS
June 14, 2011 | By Douglas Farmer
Few characters in baseball are as intriguing as Pete Rose. The major leagues' all-time hits leader with 4,256, Rose is not in the Hall of Fame because of his lifetime ban from the sport for betting on baseball games. There are no restrictions, however, on his expressing opinions about current issues in the game. This week, Rose, 70, is teaching fundamentals to youngsters attending the Pete Rose Baseball Camp at Valencia High, which is where Times staff writer Douglas Farmer caught up with him. Rose wouldn't talk about his own Hall of Fame prospects, but he did comment on the Hall and the steroid era, home-plate collisions, Derek Jeter's pursuit of 3,000 hits and even the state of affairs with the Dodgers.
SPORTS
July 12, 1988 | JOEL SHERMAN, United Press International
Ray Fosse wonders, 18 years later, if modern attitudes and medicine would have helped him recover from an injury that damaged his career. Fosse, one of baseball's emerging stars in 1970, was never the same after Pete Rose ran him over to end that year's All-Star game. "It's different in 1988 than in 1970 when a player says he's hurt," said Fosse, now a broadcaster for the Oakland Athletics. I needed somebody on the Indians to tell me I was hurt and to say I shouldn't be in the lineup."
SPORTS
December 13, 2013 | Mike Hiserman
Baseball as you knew it is changing. The major leagues, years after Little League did it, are expanding the use of instant replay and giving managers the ability to lodge challenges. And this week, a Major League Baseball rules committee announced plans to institute a rule banning head- or shoulder-first home plate collisions. That's right: No more Pete Rose crashing into Ray Fosse or Buster Posey being bowled over. Sandy Alderson, general manager of the New York Mets and chairman of the rules committee, said baserunners will not be allowed to knock over a catcher for the purpose of dislodging the ball.
SPORTS
December 12, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Remember all those time Mike Scioscia blocked the plate when he was with the Dodgers? The time Jack Clark almost knocked him unconscious when barreling over him during a Dodgers-Cardinals game? The time Dave Parker blasted into Steve Yeager (who held onto the ball, by the way)? Remember when Pete Rose ruined the career of Ray Fosse during the 1970 All-Star game? Hold on to those memories, because you won't be seeing many more collisions. Major League Baseball announced on Wednesday that it intends to eliminate home plate collisions by 2015.
SPORTS
July 6, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
Two years ago, on a May day so full of promise, baseball Commissioner Bud Selig reverently announced that the 2010 All-Star game would be played at Angel Stadium. He fibbed. I'll be a rally monkey's uncle before I'll believe that disparate group of 68 players coming to town next week is completely worthy of an All-Star game. Two years ago, Selig filled us with visions of Pete Rose crashing into Ray Fosse. Instead, we could be getting Omar Infante crashing into John Buck.
OPINION
February 28, 2014 | By Kelly Candaele
In the bottom of the 12th inning during Major League Baseball's All-Star Game in 1970, a spectacular collision took place at home plate. The National League's Pete Rose smashed into American League catcher Ray Fosse, hurling him backward into the dirt. Rose scored the winning run, while Fosse suffered a career-threatening injury. It was one of the most exciting moments in All-Star history. In February, Major League Baseball announced an experimental one-year change - Rule 7.13 - designed to reduce the chances that either a catcher or runner would be injured in an "egregious" collision at home plate.
SPORTS
December 12, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Remember all those time Mike Scioscia blocked the plate when he was with the Dodgers? The time Jack Clark almost knocked him unconscious when barreling over him during a Dodgers-Cardinals game? The time Dave Parker blasted into Steve Yeager (who held onto the ball, by the way)? Remember when Pete Rose ruined the career of Ray Fosse during the 1970 All-Star game? Hold on to those memories, because you won't be seeing many more collisions. Major League Baseball announced on Wednesday that it intends to eliminate home plate collisions by 2015.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Pete Rose is banned from Major League Baseball for gambling, but are networks that carry the national pastime prohibited from showing old footage of Charlie Hustle? That's what Fox's baseball commentator Tim McCarver told sports radio host Dan Patrick on Monday morning during an interview to promote the network's coverage of Tuesday night's All-Star game. "Major League Baseball does not like us showing video of Pete Rose on our air and from my understanding, ESPN's too," McCarver said.
SPORTS
June 14, 2011 | By Douglas Farmer
Few characters in baseball are as intriguing as Pete Rose. The major leagues' all-time hits leader with 4,256, Rose is not in the Hall of Fame because of his lifetime ban from the sport for betting on baseball games. There are no restrictions, however, on his expressing opinions about current issues in the game. This week, Rose, 70, is teaching fundamentals to youngsters attending the Pete Rose Baseball Camp at Valencia High, which is where Times staff writer Douglas Farmer caught up with him. Rose wouldn't talk about his own Hall of Fame prospects, but he did comment on the Hall and the steroid era, home-plate collisions, Derek Jeter's pursuit of 3,000 hits and even the state of affairs with the Dodgers.
SPORTS
July 6, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
Two years ago, on a May day so full of promise, baseball Commissioner Bud Selig reverently announced that the 2010 All-Star game would be played at Angel Stadium. He fibbed. I'll be a rally monkey's uncle before I'll believe that disparate group of 68 players coming to town next week is completely worthy of an All-Star game. Two years ago, Selig filled us with visions of Pete Rose crashing into Ray Fosse. Instead, we could be getting Omar Infante crashing into John Buck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER PUMMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ray Fosse succeeded in becoming the first candidate to unseat an incumbent in the Oxnard Harbor District Commission's 53-year history and also outpolled the two commissioners that voters returned to office. "There might have been some magic in being first on the ballot," said Fosse, 52, a ship's pilot at the Naval Construction Battalion Center in Port Hueneme. "There were a lot of people who backed my campaign, and we walked a lot of precincts."
SPORTS
July 12, 1988 | JOEL SHERMAN, United Press International
Ray Fosse wonders, 18 years later, if modern attitudes and medicine would have helped him recover from an injury that damaged his career. Fosse, one of baseball's emerging stars in 1970, was never the same after Pete Rose ran him over to end that year's All-Star game. "It's different in 1988 than in 1970 when a player says he's hurt," said Fosse, now a broadcaster for the Oakland Athletics. I needed somebody on the Indians to tell me I was hurt and to say I shouldn't be in the lineup."
SPORTS
June 30, 1985 | WILLIAM GILDEA, The Washington Post
What kind of man was Ty Cobb, whose record for career hits is being chased by Pete Rose? No ordinary figure in baseball or American life, Cobb was a complex personality living in simpler times. He was extremely intelligent with little formal education, seemingly possessed by some sort of demon that made him as driven as man can be, a naturally talented hitter with an abrasive personality that encouraged confrontation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996 | DAVID GREENBERG
Incumbent Oxnard Harbor Commissioner Jess Ramirez and newly elected Commissioner William Hill have begun their four-year terms, joining commission President Ray Fosse, Vice President Michael Plisky and Jess Herrera. Ramirez and Hill were sworn in Monday at the Ventura County Maritime Museum in Oxnard. One of the commission's top priorities is the proposed transfer of 33 acres of federal property to the Oxnard Harbor District's commercial Port of Hueneme.
SPORTS
June 30, 1985 | WILLIAM GILDEA, The Washington Post
What kind of man was Ty Cobb, whose record for career hits is being chased by Pete Rose? No ordinary figure in baseball or American life, Cobb was a complex personality living in simpler times. He was extremely intelligent with little formal education, seemingly possessed by some sort of demon that made him as driven as man can be, a naturally talented hitter with an abrasive personality that encouraged confrontation.
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