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Ray G Clark

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1989
Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael A. Tynan on Monday gave defense lawyers for Night Stalker suspect Richard Ramirez another day to persuade their client to allow them to go forward with a defense in the trial. Attorneys Daniel V. Hernandez and Ray G. Clark are due back in court at 10:30 a.m. today, at which time they are expected to disclose their intentions in open court and then proceed. The two had been ready to start presenting their case last week, but Ramirez began having second thoughts about that strategy, according to Clark.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
During the height of the series of Night Stalker crimes in 1985, a jumpy and "amateurish" Richard Ramirez committed up to 25 nonviolent, daytime residential burglaries throughout Los Angeles, using picks and heavy pliers to gain entry, a woman who claimed to be his accomplice testified Wednesday. Sandra Hotchkiss, now serving 14 years in state prison on other burglary convictions, told a Los Angeles Superior Court jury that she broke off from Ramirez because she found him too spooky and inexperienced to work with.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
A gloomy and "emotionally distraught" Richard Ramirez wants to forgo any defense, even an opening statement, in the so-called Night Stalker trial despite the advice of his lawyers, one of Ramirez's attorneys said Wednesday. "I think he (Ramirez) thinks that it won't do any good," Ray G. Clark said Wednesday in explaining why he and co-counsel Daniel V. Hernandez have told Judge Michael A. Tynan that they may present no defense case when the trial resumes on Monday. Between now and then, Clark said in an interview, he and Hernandez will attempt to change their client's mind, and hope to elicit the help of Ramirez's parents toward that end. Case law is not entirely clear on whether defense lawyers may go ahead with a defense over a client's objections in a death penalty case, and Clark said he has been consulting with the State Bar's Ethics Committee and the California Appellate Project, which provides assistance to lawyers handling such cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1989
Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael A. Tynan on Monday gave defense lawyers for Night Stalker suspect Richard Ramirez another day to persuade their client to allow them to go forward with a defense in the trial. Attorneys Daniel V. Hernandez and Ray G. Clark are due back in court at 10:30 a.m. today, at which time they are expected to disclose their intentions in open court and then proceed. The two had been ready to start presenting their case last week, but Ramirez began having second thoughts about that strategy, according to Clark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
After 31 court days, 137 witnesses and 521 exhibits, the prosecution in the Night Stalker trial rested Thursday. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael A. Tynan then gave the three attorneys for defendant Richard Ramirez a two-week break to prepare their case. Defense attorney Ray G. Clark said it will take two to four weeks to present Ramirez's case. In an interview outside court, Clark jocularly reiterated that the defense tack will be "S.O.D.D.I"-- "some other dude did it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
During the height of the series of Night Stalker crimes in 1985, a jumpy and "amateurish" Richard Ramirez committed up to 25 nonviolent, daytime residential burglaries throughout Los Angeles, using picks and heavy pliers to gain entry, a woman who claimed to be his accomplice testified Wednesday. Sandra Hotchkiss, now serving 14 years in state prison on other burglary convictions, told a Los Angeles Superior Court jury that she broke off from Ramirez because she found him too spooky and inexperienced to work with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Three times, Launie Dempster saw Richard Ramirez lurking in the pre-dawn darkness as she delivered newspapers in Monterey Park. The first time, Ramirez was sitting in a parked car in the 1500 block of Trumbower Avenue as she drove by. But she thought little of it until an hour later when, at the end of her route, she drove down the same block. There she saw paramedics and police at 1586 Trumbower--the site of one of the 13 Night Stalker murders with which Ramirez is now charged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Lawyers for Night Stalker defendant Richard Ramirez raised the possibility Tuesday that they may not call any defense witnesses in the serial-murder trial. The possible trial strategy was disclosed shortly before Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael A. Tynan granted the defense attorneys several days off to further consult with one another and with Ramirez and his family. Outside court, Ray G. Clark, one of Ramirez's lawyers, said only that he and co-counsel Daniel V. Hernandez need the additional time for "trial preparation" and to reconcile their "differences in style, approach and techniques."
NEWS
August 18, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
The judge in the "Night Stalker" murder trial today fined a defense attorney $100 for not showing up at court hearings. Arturo Hernandez, who has been absent for most court sessions, told the judge he had been working on the case for Richard Ramirez outside of court. He also said his brother had died during the period he was absent. Superior Court Judge Michael Tynan threatened to fine him $500 but ultimately imposed a fine of $100.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1989
After six months of testimony from more than 165 witnesses, a Los Angeles Superior Court jury on Wednesday began deliberations in the Night Stalker serial murder case. "You must reach a just verdict regardless of the consequences," Judge Michael A. Tynan told the jury of seven women and five men as they retired just before lunch to elect a foreman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
A gloomy and "emotionally distraught" Richard Ramirez wants to forgo any defense, even an opening statement, in the so-called Night Stalker trial despite the advice of his lawyers, one of Ramirez's attorneys said Wednesday. "I think he (Ramirez) thinks that it won't do any good," Ray G. Clark said Wednesday in explaining why he and co-counsel Daniel V. Hernandez have told Judge Michael A. Tynan that they may present no defense case when the trial resumes on Monday. Between now and then, Clark said in an interview, he and Hernandez will attempt to change their client's mind, and hope to elicit the help of Ramirez's parents toward that end. Case law is not entirely clear on whether defense lawyers may go ahead with a defense over a client's objections in a death penalty case, and Clark said he has been consulting with the State Bar's Ethics Committee and the California Appellate Project, which provides assistance to lawyers handling such cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Lawyers for Night Stalker defendant Richard Ramirez raised the possibility Tuesday that they may not call any defense witnesses in the serial-murder trial. The possible trial strategy was disclosed shortly before Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael A. Tynan granted the defense attorneys several days off to further consult with one another and with Ramirez and his family. Outside court, Ray G. Clark, one of Ramirez's lawyers, said only that he and co-counsel Daniel V. Hernandez need the additional time for "trial preparation" and to reconcile their "differences in style, approach and techniques."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Three times, Launie Dempster saw Richard Ramirez lurking in the pre-dawn darkness as she delivered newspapers in Monterey Park. The first time, Ramirez was sitting in a parked car in the 1500 block of Trumbower Avenue as she drove by. But she thought little of it until an hour later when, at the end of her route, she drove down the same block. There she saw paramedics and police at 1586 Trumbower--the site of one of the 13 Night Stalker murders with which Ramirez is now charged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
After 31 court days, 137 witnesses and 521 exhibits, the prosecution in the Night Stalker trial rested Thursday. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael A. Tynan then gave the three attorneys for defendant Richard Ramirez a two-week break to prepare their case. Defense attorney Ray G. Clark said it will take two to four weeks to present Ramirez's case. In an interview outside court, Clark jocularly reiterated that the defense tack will be "S.O.D.D.I"-- "some other dude did it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1989
Lawyers concluded their arguments Tuesday before a Los Angeles Superior Court jury in the Night Stalker trial, and jurors are to begin deliberations some time today after receiving instructions from Judge Michael A. Tynan. "You have all the evidence in the world to reach the logical and reasonable conclusion that the defendant is guilty as charged," Deputy Dist. Atty. Phil Halpin said as he concluded his closing remarks.
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