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Ray Goulding

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NEWS
March 26, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Goulding, the heftier half of "Bob and Ray," radio's four-decade-long testament to mirth and gentle mayhem, has died at his home in Manhasset, Long Island. His son, Bryant, said Sunday that his father had died in his sleep of kidney failure and was found Saturday morning.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1997 | MICHAEL OLLOVE
In a typical Bob and Ray interview, it would become quickly apparent that the guest was a complete dolt. In one famous routine, Bob interviews Ray as Alfred E. Nelson, author of a new 1,100-page history of the United States. But, as Bob points out, the book is loaded with absurd errors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
There were probably one o'clock classes in astronomy, Greek history or physical geography that, if I had taken them, would have changed my life. But, when I went back to college after a khaki interruption, you didn't take one o'clock classes if you could humanly avoid them, because that was when you listened to "Matinee With Bob and Ray" on WHDH in Boston. The Ray was Ray Goulding, who died the other day after a long battle with kidney disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1997 | MICHAEL OLLOVE, THE BALTIMORE SUN
First on Larry Josephson's agenda is an introduction to his toys. They spill from shelves and coffee tables and box tops onto the floor just inside the front door of his Radio Foundation offices. One by one, he picks them up to demonstrate: a radio in the form of chattering lips, slippers that make dinosaur noises and a pig that dances to "La Bamba." Best of all is "The Whipping Boy," a stricken-looking man with his head between his hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1990 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Bob and Ray Coming to Comedy Channel: Home Box Office's Comedy Channel has announced some new additions that include the acquisition of episodes of the 1950s comedy series "The Bob and Ray Show"; a new show starring Richard Belzer; a showcase of public-access programming; and deals with Spy magazine, P. J. O'Rourke and Penn and Teller. The channel has exclusive rights to air the 15-minute Bob and Ray shows, which haven't been seen since their original live airings on NBC in the early 1950s.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
Hugh Downs actually slapped his knee he was so amused by what was happening on the monitor in the "Tonight Show's" green room. His daughter, watching the same monitor, rolled her eyes and grimaced. Jay Leno's guests, Bob and Chris Elliott, father and son, were making a shameless pre-Father's Day pitch for Chris' book "Daddy's Boy," a "Shocking Account of Life with a Famous Father." As usual, they waltzed a dangerous line between droll and dumb, and as Chris described his sixth birthday party--at which columnist Art Buchwald allegedly rode around on the Elliott family's giant trained pig--people watching from behind the scenes seemed evenly divided as to which side of the line the two comedians were on. A partner in the comedy team Bob and Ray, Bob Elliott has spent four decades building a reputation as a sort of anti-celebrity.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1997 | MICHAEL OLLOVE
In a typical Bob and Ray interview, it would become quickly apparent that the guest was a complete dolt. In one famous routine, Bob interviews Ray as Alfred E. Nelson, author of a new 1,100-page history of the United States. But, as Bob points out, the book is loaded with absurd errors.
BOOKS
February 16, 1986 | SHELLY LOWENKOPF
Bob Elliott and Ray Goulding have been tickling the American fancy since 1946; their bailiwick was radio, but that quickly and irrevocably expanded to include our hearts. This latest book, their third, is a collection of set pieces and skits featuring such antic facets of their alter egos as Wally Ballou, the intrepid reporter; Lloyd the gardener; Tippy, the Wonder Dog ("Here, Tippy, Tippy, Tippy."); Hoyt Netley of Syracuse University, and Officer Wishmiller of the Alaska State Highway Patrol.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1997 | MICHAEL OLLOVE, THE BALTIMORE SUN
First on Larry Josephson's agenda is an introduction to his toys. They spill from shelves and coffee tables and box tops onto the floor just inside the front door of his Radio Foundation offices. One by one, he picks them up to demonstrate: a radio in the form of chattering lips, slippers that make dinosaur noises and a pig that dances to "La Bamba." Best of all is "The Whipping Boy," a stricken-looking man with his head between his hands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Audrey Meadows, revered as the feisty Alice Kramden opposite Jackie Gleason's garrulous bus driver Ralph in television's comedy classic "The Honeymooners," has died. Meadows died of lung cancer at 8:50 p.m. Saturday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, hospital spokesman Ron Wise said Sunday. Relatives said she was 69. Meadows had concealed the terminal illness for more than a year, even from her sister and brother-in-law, entertainers Jayne Meadows and Steve Allen.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
There were probably one o'clock classes in astronomy, Greek history or physical geography that, if I had taken them, would have changed my life. But, when I went back to college after a khaki interruption, you didn't take one o'clock classes if you could humanly avoid them, because that was when you listened to "Matinee With Bob and Ray" on WHDH in Boston. The Ray was Ray Goulding, who died the other day after a long battle with kidney disease.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Goulding, the heftier half of "Bob and Ray," radio's four-decade-long testament to mirth and gentle mayhem, has died at his home in Manhasset, Long Island. His son, Bryant, said Sunday that his father had died in his sleep of kidney failure and was found Saturday morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1990 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Bob and Ray Coming to Comedy Channel: Home Box Office's Comedy Channel has announced some new additions that include the acquisition of episodes of the 1950s comedy series "The Bob and Ray Show"; a new show starring Richard Belzer; a showcase of public-access programming; and deals with Spy magazine, P. J. O'Rourke and Penn and Teller. The channel has exclusive rights to air the 15-minute Bob and Ray shows, which haven't been seen since their original live airings on NBC in the early 1950s.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
Hugh Downs actually slapped his knee he was so amused by what was happening on the monitor in the "Tonight Show's" green room. His daughter, watching the same monitor, rolled her eyes and grimaced. Jay Leno's guests, Bob and Chris Elliott, father and son, were making a shameless pre-Father's Day pitch for Chris' book "Daddy's Boy," a "Shocking Account of Life with a Famous Father." As usual, they waltzed a dangerous line between droll and dumb, and as Chris described his sixth birthday party--at which columnist Art Buchwald allegedly rode around on the Elliott family's giant trained pig--people watching from behind the scenes seemed evenly divided as to which side of the line the two comedians were on. A partner in the comedy team Bob and Ray, Bob Elliott has spent four decades building a reputation as a sort of anti-celebrity.
BOOKS
February 16, 1986 | SHELLY LOWENKOPF
Bob Elliott and Ray Goulding have been tickling the American fancy since 1946; their bailiwick was radio, but that quickly and irrevocably expanded to include our hearts. This latest book, their third, is a collection of set pieces and skits featuring such antic facets of their alter egos as Wally Ballou, the intrepid reporter; Lloyd the gardener; Tippy, the Wonder Dog ("Here, Tippy, Tippy, Tippy."); Hoyt Netley of Syracuse University, and Officer Wishmiller of the Alaska State Highway Patrol.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The Museum of Broadcasting's television festival at the County Museum of Art, which is about to have its sixth running, has become an important annual fixture. The festival's artful blending of past and present, nostalgia and current celebration, would be a hit in Syracuse or Minneapolis, but it goes down particularly well here, where a good deal of the product originated and where many of its creators live and can be persuaded to come along, take a bow and explain how the magic happened.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2004 | Gerald Nachman, Special to The Times
A good book is struggling to get out of "Mixed Nuts" -- a crucial if not quite critical enough survey of the great and less great American comedy teams. Often it does, whenever author Lawrence J. Epstein escapes his own tortured analysis and tangled socio-cultural theories.
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