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Ray Harryhausen

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May 8, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan
The work of special-effects pioneer Ray Harryhausen, who died Tuesday at 92, was chronicled in a 2004 memoir he wrote with British film historian Tony Dalton titled “Ray Harryhausen: An Animated Life.” In the book, Harryhausen noted that he was especially proud of the skeleton sword fight in the 1963 film “Jason and the Argonauts.” The complex sequence illustrates the time, patience and concentration such work entailed. PHOTOS: Ray Harryhausen - Career in pictures “I had three men fighting seven skeletons and each skeleton had five appendages to move in each separate frame of film,” he wrote in his book.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Susan King
The American Cinematheque and the Visual Effects Society are joining forces next month to pay homage to the pioneering stop-motion special effects wizard Ray Harryhausen, who died in London on May 7 at age 92. “The King of Stop-Motion: Ray Harryhausen Remembered” opens June 6 at the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica with 1958's “The 7th Voyage of Sinbad,” directed by Nathan Juran and starring Kerwin Matthews and Kathryn Grant, who became...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan
Ray Harryhausen, a stop-motion animation pioneer who became a cult figure for creating special effects for “The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms,” “Jason and the Argonauts” and other science fiction and fantasy film classics, died Tuesday in London of natural causes. He was 92. His death was confirmed by Kenneth Kleinberg, his longtime legal representative in the United States. Harryhausen, a Los Angeles native who lived in London for more than four decades, inspired generations of filmmakers and special-effects artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Master stop-motion visual effects artist Ray Harryhausen died Tuesday at age 92. There have been multiple farewells and remembrances of the man who brought so many mythical monsters to life on the big screen, but Sony Movie Channel is saying farewell the best way possible: actually showing his movies. On Saturday, the channel will air three of Harryhausen's films from its library: "The 7th Voyage of Sinbad," "The Golden Voyage of Sinbad" and "Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger. " The films will follow a documentary about the man and work titled, "Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan," which will air at 9:45 a.m. PDT. PHOTOS: Ray Harryhausen -- Career in pictures "The 7th Voyage of Sinbad" was released in 1958 and was the first of the three Sinbad movies Harryhausen produced for Columbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Over the course of his imaginative and painstaking career, the stop-motion animation wizard Ray Harryhausen created some of the most dazzling effects to grace the silver screen, and all without the benefit of computer-generated imagery. Following are but a few of Harryhausen's memorable creations. "Mighty Joe Young" (1949) As a teenage boy, Harryhausen had been awestruck by the original "King Kong," which was released in 1933, so the opportunity to work alongside that film's animation guru, Willis O'Brien, on another giant-ape movie was something of a dream come true.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Master stop-motion visual effects artist Ray Harryhausen died Tuesday at age 92. There have been multiple farewells and remembrances of the man who brought so many mythical monsters to life on the big screen, but Sony Movie Channel is saying farewell the best way possible: actually showing his movies. On Saturday, the channel will air three of Harryhausen's films from its library: "The 7th Voyage of Sinbad," "The Golden Voyage of Sinbad" and "Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger. " The films will follow a documentary about the man and work titled, "Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan," which will air at 9:45 a.m. PDT. PHOTOS: Ray Harryhausen -- Career in pictures "The 7th Voyage of Sinbad" was released in 1958 and was the first of the three Sinbad movies Harryhausen produced for Columbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
What's your favorite animated movie? Chances are, the team behind it was influenced by stop-motion and visual effects pioneer Ray Harryhausen, with maybe a dash of Looney Tunes titan Chuck Jones thrown in. And now you can see why. Two exhibitions curated by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences — "The Fantastical Worlds of Ray Harryhausen" and "Chuck Jones: An Animator's Life From A to Z-Z-Z-Z" — will display sketches, animation...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ray Harryhausen, the stop-motion animation legend whose work on "The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms," "Jason and the Argonauts" and other science fiction and fantasy film classics made him a cult figure who inspired later generations of filmmakers and special-effects artists, has died. He was 92. Harryhausen died Tuesday in London, where he had lived for decades. His death was confirmed by Kenneth Kleinberg, his longtime legal representative in the United States. In the pre-computer-generated-imagery era in which he worked, Harryhausen used the painstaking process of making slight adjustments to the position of his three-dimensional, ball-and-socket-jointed scale models and then shooting them frame-by-frame to create the illusion of movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1999
A three-day film fete celebrating the work of special-effects pioneer Ray Harryhausen kicks off tonight at 7 at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (8949 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills) with screenings of the fully restored 1958 "7th Voyage of Sinbad" and the rarely screened "20 Million Miles to Earth." Director Nathan Juran and actor Richard Eyer will join Harryhausen on stage for a discussion moderated by Charles Champlin. Tickets are $20.
BOOKS
May 16, 2004 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is a contributing writer to Book Review and reviews movies for Time. He is the producer of a reconstruction of Samuel Fuller's "The Big Red One," which premieres this week at the Cannes film festival.
A songwriter leans too far out of his 10th-floor office in the Brill Building and falls toward Broadway far below. But an open truck loaded with mattresses is passing and he lands harmlessly on a pile of Posturepedics. Two actors strolling along witness the near-disaster. "That's the luckiest guy in show business," says one of them. "No," says the other, "Andrew Lloyd Webber."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan
The work of special-effects pioneer Ray Harryhausen, who died Tuesday at 92, was chronicled in a 2004 memoir he wrote with British film historian Tony Dalton titled “Ray Harryhausen: An Animated Life.” In the book, Harryhausen noted that he was especially proud of the skeleton sword fight in the 1963 film “Jason and the Argonauts.” The complex sequence illustrates the time, patience and concentration such work entailed. PHOTOS: Ray Harryhausen - Career in pictures “I had three men fighting seven skeletons and each skeleton had five appendages to move in each separate frame of film,” he wrote in his book.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Over the course of his imaginative and painstaking career, the stop-motion animation wizard Ray Harryhausen created some of the most dazzling effects to grace the silver screen, and all without the benefit of computer-generated imagery. Following are but a few of Harryhausen's memorable creations. "Mighty Joe Young" (1949) As a teenage boy, Harryhausen had been awestruck by the original "King Kong," which was released in 1933, so the opportunity to work alongside that film's animation guru, Willis O'Brien, on another giant-ape movie was something of a dream come true.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan
Ray Harryhausen, a stop-motion animation pioneer who became a cult figure for creating special effects for “The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms,” “Jason and the Argonauts” and other science fiction and fantasy film classics, died Tuesday in London of natural causes. He was 92. His death was confirmed by Kenneth Kleinberg, his longtime legal representative in the United States. Harryhausen, a Los Angeles native who lived in London for more than four decades, inspired generations of filmmakers and special-effects artists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ray Harryhausen, the stop-motion animation legend whose work on "The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms," "Jason and the Argonauts" and other science fiction and fantasy film classics made him a cult figure who inspired later generations of filmmakers and special-effects artists, has died. He was 92. Harryhausen died Tuesday in London, where he had lived for decades. His death was confirmed by Kenneth Kleinberg, his longtime legal representative in the United States. In the pre-computer-generated-imagery era in which he worked, Harryhausen used the painstaking process of making slight adjustments to the position of his three-dimensional, ball-and-socket-jointed scale models and then shooting them frame-by-frame to create the illusion of movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman and Julie Makinen
Directors, actors and animation fans of all stripes saluted Ray Harryhausen on Tuesday as news of the visual effects pioneer's death reached Hollywood. Harryhausen, the stop-motion animator of such classics as 1955's "It Came From Outer Space," 1958's "The 7th Voyage of Sinbad," 1963's "Jason and the Argonauts" and 1981's "Clash of the Titans," created Dynamation -- a technique that allowed models to be integrated into live-action films. His work inspired many who are driving the special-effects laden filmmaking that dominates in Hollywood today.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2012 | By Sari Heifetz Stricke, Special to the Los Angeles Times
From the earliest days of cinema, audiences have loved to be scared. The three-minute film from French cinema pioneer Georges Méliès, "The Haunted Castle," hit screens in 1896 with celluloid skeletons, ghosts, witches and even the devil himself, and our appetite for thrills hasn't abated since. Franchises such as "Saw" and "Paranormal Activity" continue to redefine the horror genre while setting records at the box office. Directors John Landis and Joe Dante know about horror: Their respective films "An American Werewolf in London" and "Gremlins" are classics of the genre (even if they do have elements of humor)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2002 | Michael Mallory, Special to The Times
The slow but steady Tortoise has finally crossed the finish line -- and it only took 50 years. The stop-motion animated fable "The Tortoise and the Hare" is the last of six fairy-tale shorts in a project begun after World War II by animation-effects wizard Ray Harryhausen, best known for his work in 1950s and '60s fantasy classics such as "The 7th Voyage of Sinbad" and "Jason and the Argonauts."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2009 | Jon Thurber
Charles H. Schneer, a film producer best known for his influential collaboration on several movies with special effects genius Ray Harryhausen, has died. He was 88. Schneer died Wednesday at a hospice in Boca Raton, Fla., according to his daughter Stacey Schneer Lee. Schneer, who most recently had been living in Delray Beach, Fla., had been ill for several years, his daughter said in a news release.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Art of the Steal MPI, $24.98 Don Argott's documentary tells a fascinating story about how the last wishes of art collector Albert Barnes have been circumvented by the stewards of his foundation, affecting the fate of one of the most important collections in America. Argott might have taken a more objective stance, given that the plans for this art — namely that it might end up in a space where more people will see it — is hardly as big a crime as the title implies.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Decades before Robert Pattinson's portrayal of brooding vampire Edward Cullen turned him into an international heartthrob, Jonathan Frid was inspiring a similar kind of ardor with his turn as the charismatic, enigmatic Barnabas Collins on ABC's gothic daytime drama "Dark Shadows," which ran from 1966 to 1971. This weekend, the Dark Shadows of the Sun convention will take place at the Marriott Burbank Airport Hotel. And at 12:30 p.m. Friday at the vintage Vista Theatre in Los Feliz, Frid will put his footprints in cement in the theater's courtyard.
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