Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRay J Zelinski
IN THE NEWS

Ray J Zelinski

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | JOHN HURST and DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A senior state Department of Transportation engineer in charge of the program to strengthen bridges to make them earthquake-resistant reported in 1985 that there was no need to bolster bridge columns until future earthquakes showed them to be vulnerable, state documents show. Ray J.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | JOHN HURST and DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A senior state Department of Transportation engineer in charge of the program to strengthen bridges to make them earthquake-resistant reported in 1985 that there was no need to bolster bridge columns until future earthquakes showed them to be vulnerable, state documents show. Ray J.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | JOHN HURST and DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A top State Department of Transportation engineer told The Times Friday that technology exists--and has existed for nearly 20 years--that might have prevented the collapse of the Nimitz Freeway in Oakland, where at least 33 people were killed during Tuesday's earthquake. The engineer, who spoke on the condition that he not be identified, contradicted Caltrans chief engineer William E. Schaefer, who has repeatedly claimed that no such technology exists.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | JOHN HURST and DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A top State Department of Transportation engineer told The Times Friday that technology exists--and has existed for nearly 20 years--that might have prevented the collapse of the Nimitz Freeway in Oakland, where at least 32 people were killed during Tuesday's earthquake. The engineer, who spoke on the condition that he not be identified, contradicted Caltrans chief engineer William E. Schaefer, who has repeatedly claimed that no such technology exists.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It wasn't supposed to happen this way. When a major earthquake strikes in California, state officials expect to see plenty of damage. Broken water mains flooding streets. Cracked gas lines setting off fires. Older brick buildings crumbling to the ground. But freeways and bridges are supposed to stand up under the shaking, with only some buckling and cracking of the concrete. No one among the state's top road and bridge engineers thought that a major freeway would simply collapse.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California's program to strengthen highway bridges against earthquakes has risen and fallen for 18 years like the earth's crust in a major temblor, shaking violently into action with each major quake but never sustaining its energy over an extended period. The effort, begun after the 1971 San Fernando Valley earthquake, has been thwarted by the tight-fisted budget policies of two governors--Edmund G. Brown Jr.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|