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Ray Johnson

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NEWS
November 22, 1993 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Johnson, the affable conservative who fled the GOP when fellow Republicans tried to gerrymander him from his Northern California state Senate district, died Thursday. The Legislature's first independent in more than 30 years was 82 when he died at his Chico home. He had undergone heart surgery in 1989, although a cause of death was not disclosed. Johnson served 18 years in the Legislature, 10 in the Assembly and eight in the Senate. Called by Gov.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
You don't just learn how to draw a bunny in "How to Draw a Bunny," the delightful, unabashedly celebratory documentary about the life and times of the late artist Ray Johnson, you learn a few other useful things as well. For instance: In the lost paradise of New York City during the 1950s, you could rent a cold-water flat for $28 a month. After rent, there wasn't much money for food, but you could drown in free booze at parties while you grew thinner in the name of your muse.
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NEWS
November 8, 1989 | JOE McGARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Johnson, 62, an ex-convict who dedicated the last 20 years of his life trying to prevent the kind of crimes that had landed him in California jails and prisons since he was 7, has died at Scripps Memorial Hospital. Johnson, who was born in New York and moved to San Diego with his family when he was 1, died Sunday of kidney failure. He had been in poor health for the past year, said Steve Casey, a longtime friend and spokesman for the San Diego district attorney's office.
NEWS
March 11, 2004 | Steven Rosen, Special to The Times
Suicide is always a tragedy. Yet in the mysterious case of artist Ray Johnson, who jumped off a bridge into Long Island's Sag Harbor on Friday the 13th in January 1995, the act also was a final performance piece. It was filled with references to the unlucky number 13, including his age, 67 (6+7=13). And at his home in Locust Valley, Long Island, police found stacks of Johnson's artworks facing the wall. Only a small portrait of him faced outward -- as if he were staring at them.
NEWS
March 11, 2004 | Steven Rosen, Special to The Times
Suicide is always a tragedy. Yet in the mysterious case of artist Ray Johnson, who jumped off a bridge into Long Island's Sag Harbor on Friday the 13th in January 1995, the act also was a final performance piece. It was filled with references to the unlucky number 13, including his age, 67 (6+7=13). And at his home in Locust Valley, Long Island, police found stacks of Johnson's artworks facing the wall. Only a small portrait of him faced outward -- as if he were staring at them.
SPORTS
December 25, 1986 | JEFFREY PARENTI
Edmond Johnson, a guard on the El Camino High School basketball team, once made a detour on his road to success but has since found his way. Johnson, The Times' Player of the Week, hopes to earn a college basketball scholarship, and if his play last week--89 points and 40 assists as El Camino finished second in the Mitchell Tournament--is any indication, he's well on his way. But it wasn't long ago that Johnson, 17, was heading in the wrong direction. He was involved in drugs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
You don't just learn how to draw a bunny in "How to Draw a Bunny," the delightful, unabashedly celebratory documentary about the life and times of the late artist Ray Johnson, you learn a few other useful things as well. For instance: In the lost paradise of New York City during the 1950s, you could rent a cold-water flat for $28 a month. After rent, there wasn't much money for food, but you could drown in free booze at parties while you grew thinner in the name of your muse.
BOOKS
November 1, 1998 | MARK ROZZO, Mark Rozzo's "First Fiction" column appears monthly in Book Review
THE HISTORY OF OUR WORLD BEYOND THE WAVE. By R. E. Klein (Harcourt Brace: 224 pp., $22) On the first day of summer, Paul Sant, a Southern California English professor, heads to the beach, rents a surf mat and witnesses the end of the world. A tidal wave crashes ashore, and Sant finds himself floating on a limitless sea.
SPORTS
November 15, 1997 | EARL GUSTKEY, From Staff and Wire Reports
The Long Beach StingRays traded backup guard Nicky McCrimmon and a 1998 first-round draft pick to the Atlanta Glory on Friday for starting guard Niesa Johnson. McCrimmon, from USC, was playing behind point guard Andrea Nagy and off guard Beverly Williams, and did not figure to beat either out this season. Johnson, an All-American at Alabama in 1995-96, was the ABL's leading free-throw shooter (87%) last season and was third in assists (6.3), fourth in steals (2.
NEWS
March 21, 1985
California Highway Patrol officers help motorists about one-third as often as they issue tickets or arrest them, the agency said. CHP Chief Ray Johnson said officers performed 1.56 million motorist services in 1984, compared to 4.15 million arrests and issuances of tickets and warnings.
BOOKS
November 1, 1998 | MARK ROZZO, Mark Rozzo's "First Fiction" column appears monthly in Book Review
THE HISTORY OF OUR WORLD BEYOND THE WAVE. By R. E. Klein (Harcourt Brace: 224 pp., $22) On the first day of summer, Paul Sant, a Southern California English professor, heads to the beach, rents a surf mat and witnesses the end of the world. A tidal wave crashes ashore, and Sant finds himself floating on a limitless sea.
SPORTS
November 15, 1997 | EARL GUSTKEY, From Staff and Wire Reports
The Long Beach StingRays traded backup guard Nicky McCrimmon and a 1998 first-round draft pick to the Atlanta Glory on Friday for starting guard Niesa Johnson. McCrimmon, from USC, was playing behind point guard Andrea Nagy and off guard Beverly Williams, and did not figure to beat either out this season. Johnson, an All-American at Alabama in 1995-96, was the ABL's leading free-throw shooter (87%) last season and was third in assists (6.3), fourth in steals (2.
NEWS
November 22, 1993 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Johnson, the affable conservative who fled the GOP when fellow Republicans tried to gerrymander him from his Northern California state Senate district, died Thursday. The Legislature's first independent in more than 30 years was 82 when he died at his Chico home. He had undergone heart surgery in 1989, although a cause of death was not disclosed. Johnson served 18 years in the Legislature, 10 in the Assembly and eight in the Senate. Called by Gov.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | JOE McGARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Johnson, 62, an ex-convict who dedicated the last 20 years of his life trying to prevent the kind of crimes that had landed him in California jails and prisons since he was 7, has died at Scripps Memorial Hospital. Johnson, who was born in New York and moved to San Diego with his family when he was 1, died Sunday of kidney failure. He had been in poor health for the past year, said Steve Casey, a longtime friend and spokesman for the San Diego district attorney's office.
SPORTS
December 25, 1986 | JEFFREY PARENTI
Edmond Johnson, a guard on the El Camino High School basketball team, once made a detour on his road to success but has since found his way. Johnson, The Times' Player of the Week, hopes to earn a college basketball scholarship, and if his play last week--89 points and 40 assists as El Camino finished second in the Mitchell Tournament--is any indication, he's well on his way. But it wasn't long ago that Johnson, 17, was heading in the wrong direction. He was involved in drugs.
NEWS
February 20, 1986
An ordinance to increase council salaries was adopted 3-1 by the City Council Monday. The salaries were raised from $294 to $323 per month. Councilman Ray Johnson voted against the measure and Councilman Jay Price abstained. The increase will go into effect 30 days from Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1990
A 15-year-old boy was shot in the chest by his father during a family dispute in Logan Heights Saturday morning, police said. David Johnson was reported in fair condition and improving Saturday night by a UCSD Medical Center spokeswoman. Young Johnson was shot in the chest with a .38-caliber revolver by his father, Ray C. Johnson, at the family's home in the 1800 block of Irving Avenue, San Diego police said.
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