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Ray Kroc

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2013 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
A grill man turned chief executive at McDonald's, Fred L. Turner oversaw an aggressive expansion of the company beginning in the 1970s that turned it into a corporate giant. When he began reshaping the restaurants in 1968, he left a visible legacy by removing the signature golden arches from the building's architecture and placing them on signs out front. What McDonald's founder Ray Kroc called Turner's gift for "planning and vision" is reflected in a restaurant menu that includes the Quarter-Pounder, which he co-developed with a California franchise owner in 1971.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | By David Ng
San Diego Opera has postponed its closure by two weeks in order to give its board of directors time to seek out new funding from the city and other donors. The postponement comes in the wake of a public backlash against the company for its abrupt announcement last month that it would shut down.  The decision to postpone the closure until April 29 was made during a Monday board meeting, according to Karen Cohn, president of the board. She said San Diego Opera would need to find a major donation on the order of Joan Kroc's $10-million bequest in order to continue operating as it has in the past.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2003 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Joan B. Kroc, the railroad worker's daughter who married a fast-food magnate, owned the San Diego Padres baseball team and donated hundreds of millions of dollars to philanthropic causes, died Sunday at her home in suburban Rancho Santa Fe. She was 75. Kroc suffered from a kind of brain cancer but, in characteristic form, had kept her illness a secret lest her friends find it upsetting. She was the largest single stockholder of McDonald's Corp., with a fortune estimated at $1.2 billion.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By David Ng
After years of uncertainty, it appears that the "Chain Reaction" sculpture by Paul Conrad will be saved. The Santa Monica City Council voted on Tuesday to allocate $100,000 in public donations as well as additional city funds to repair the 1991 outdoor sculpture, which had been the subject of debate over its safety. The L.A. Now blog first reported the story late Tuesday. Critics of the anti-nuclear sculpture said that it was unstable and unsafe for the public and that it needed to be removed from its location near the Santa Monica Civic Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1990 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
After-Christmas Present: The La Jolla Playhouse is facing a cheerier new year, thanks to a $400,000 gift from the Joan B. Kroc Foundation. Kroc is the widow of Ray Kroc, founder of McDonald's. The grant, which enabled the Playhouse to balance its 1989 operations budget, is separate from the theater's current financial stabilization campaign, which is lobbying to raise $1 million by June 30.
NEWS
May 30, 1985
Philanthropist Joan Kroc, widow of McDonald's restaurant founder Ray Kroc, will be awarded the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith's "National Distinguished Community Service Award" at a formal dinner in her honor June 19 at the Hotel Inter-Continental. Kroc will be feted for, among other things, her recent $1-million donation to Ethiopian famine relief and for Operation Cork, an organization she founded to increase awareness of drug and alcohol abuse.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By David Ng
After years of uncertainty, it appears that the "Chain Reaction" sculpture by Paul Conrad will be saved. The Santa Monica City Council voted on Tuesday to allocate $100,000 in public donations as well as additional city funds to repair the 1991 outdoor sculpture, which had been the subject of debate over its safety. The L.A. Now blog first reported the story late Tuesday. Critics of the anti-nuclear sculpture said that it was unstable and unsafe for the public and that it needed to be removed from its location near the Santa Monica Civic Center.
SPORTS
April 5, 1986 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
The late Ray Kroc told this story in his autobiography, "Grinding It Out": " . . . I got in the car with Joni at the airport and told her that I was thinking of buying the San Diego Padres. She looked at me quizzically and said, "What on earth is that, a monastery?" Now, Joan Kroc knows. But here in her third full year as Padre owner, baseball has not always been very, very good to her.
SPORTS
April 7, 1986 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
The late Ray Kroc told this story in his autobiography, "Grinding It Out": "I got in the car with Joni at the airport and told her that I was thinking of buying the San Diego Padres. She looked at me quizzically and said, 'What on earth is that, a monastery?' " Now, Joan Kroc knows. But here in her third full year as Padre owner, baseball has not always been very, very good to her.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2013 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
A grill man turned chief executive at McDonald's, Fred L. Turner oversaw an aggressive expansion of the company beginning in the 1970s that turned it into a corporate giant. When he began reshaping the restaurants in 1968, he left a visible legacy by removing the signature golden arches from the building's architecture and placing them on signs out front. What McDonald's founder Ray Kroc called Turner's gift for "planning and vision" is reflected in a restaurant menu that includes the Quarter-Pounder, which he co-developed with a California franchise owner in 1971.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2003 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Joan B. Kroc, the railroad worker's daughter who married a fast-food magnate, owned the San Diego Padres baseball team and donated hundreds of millions of dollars to philanthropic causes, died Sunday at her home in suburban Rancho Santa Fe. She was 75. Kroc suffered from a kind of brain cancer but, in characteristic form, had kept her illness a secret lest her friends find it upsetting. She was the largest single stockholder of McDonald's Corp., with a fortune estimated at $1.2 billion.
SPORTS
March 6, 1991 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're gone now, virtually every last one of them. If they haven't been fired, they have quit. Some still are being paid by the club for services rendered. Others are being paid simply to keep their mouths shut. The cast of characters, representing the wacky tradition of the San Diego Padres, is supposed to be fading into the sunset, soon to be forgotten. Everything, in fact, is being done to change the image. The Padres' new owners have hired a new front-office staff.
SPORTS
July 27, 1990 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After all these years, the one image of Joan Kroc that will not go away is that of her standing on the pitcher's mound in front of a sellout San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium crowd, in full Padre uniform, smiling for all the world like a little girl in her first Easter dress. There she was, ready to throw out the first ball in the first National League playoff game in San Diego, standing tall and thinking about her late husband, Ray.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | ALICE KAHN
When you're back near home-sweet-home Chicago for an Elvis Presley impersonators' convention but stuck at an airport hotel without a car, what do you do? You walk out a little and reach the kind of neighborhood you thought had stopped existing when you left the Midwest in 1961 and vowed: I'll never live in this boring place again. Only now, it looks beautiful to you. Every detail seems precious. The neat lawns. The picket fences. The polite children lined up for the school bus.
NEWS
October 13, 1985 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Once upon a time, before the invention of nuclear warheads and Chicken McNuggets, a girl named Joan was growing up in the Midwest, dreaming of becoming a nurse or a veterinarian. As fate would have it, Joan Beverly Kroc, 57, is now entrusted with one of the great fortunes of contemporary America--that amassed by her late husband, Ray A. Kroc, founder of the McDonald's Restaurant empire. Forbes Magazine estimates her net worth as "exceeding $525 million."
SPORTS
June 20, 1990 | BOB WOLF
"I have never seen such stupid ballplaying in my life." RAY KROC April 9, 1974 It wasn't an auspicious home debut for Ray Kroc as owner of the Padres, but he couldn't contain himself. To say that Kroc was upset with his new employees would be to understate the case. He was so enraged that he grabbed the public-address microphone and told the Padres what he thought about the way they were playing.
SPORTS
June 20, 1990 | BOB WOLF
"I have never seen such stupid ballplaying in my life." RAY KROC April 9, 1974 It wasn't an auspicious home debut for Ray Kroc as owner of the Padres, but he couldn't contain himself. To say that Kroc was upset with his new employees would be to understate the case. He was so enraged that he grabbed the public-address microphone and told the Padres what he thought about the way they were playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1990 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
After-Christmas Present: The La Jolla Playhouse is facing a cheerier new year, thanks to a $400,000 gift from the Joan B. Kroc Foundation. Kroc is the widow of Ray Kroc, founder of McDonald's. The grant, which enabled the Playhouse to balance its 1989 operations budget, is separate from the theater's current financial stabilization campaign, which is lobbying to raise $1 million by June 30.
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