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Ray Lahood

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NATIONAL
December 18, 2008 | CHICAGO TRIBUNE
President-elect Barack Obama has chosen Rep. Ray LaHood (R-Ill.) as his Transportation secretary, a key role in an administration that has signaled plans for an ambitious public works program, officials of both parties said Wednesday. A spokesman for the Obama transition team declined to comment, as did LaHood. But his nomination, which is expected to be announced soon, would fulfill a pledge Obama made to name a Republican to his Cabinet. Although Obama has asked Defense Secretary Robert M.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said Friday that he plans to stay mayor until the end of his term June 30, an announcement aimed at ending talk of him taking a post as President Obama's secretary of Transportation. "I have said many times that I will be focused on my job as mayor of Los Angeles until 11:59 and 59 seconds on June 30, 2013," Villaraigosa said in a prepared statement. "I am flattered and humbled by the speculation that has included my name for a possible Cabinet secretary position, but I am firmly committed to remaining in L.A. and finishing my term.
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NATIONAL
April 13, 2009 | Mike Dorning
When President Obama needs to reach out to the political opposition, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood often gets the call to be the go-between. "He's our ambassador beyond his portfolio," said White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel. When Obama traveled to Capitol Hill to meet with GOP House members, LaHood was by his side. When a group of moderate Republicans came to the White House to talk over the stimulus package, LaHood was in the room. Defense Secretary Robert M.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, the last Republican left in President Obama's Cabinet, announced Tuesday he is stepping down. In a note to department staff, LaHood said he would remain at the helm until a replacement is confirmed to ensure "a smooth transition for the department and all the important work we still have to do. " The former seven-term congressman from Peoria, Ill., has led the department since 2009 and was not expected to stay on through a second term.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, the last Republican left in President Obama's Cabinet, announced Tuesday he is stepping down. In a note to department staff, LaHood said he would remain at the helm until a replacement is confirmed to ensure "a smooth transition for the department and all the important work we still have to do. " The former seven-term congressman from Peoria, Ill., has led the department since 2009 and was not expected to stay on through a second term.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Katherine Skiba
Ray LaHood, who heads the U.S. Department of Transportation, said today he is staying in that job for one term only and will not run for public office again. LaHood, 65, is a Republican from Peoria, Ill., who served in Congress for 14 years ending in January 2009, when he became a Cabinet secretary for President Obama. He was not a candidate for reelection to Congress in 2008. LaHood, whose name is sometimes mentioned for posts such as Illinois governor, said: "I'm not running for public office anymore," and specifically ruled out a run for governor.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2010 | Ralph Vartabedian and Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
Signaling renewed vigor in the federal government's scrutiny of Toyota Motor Corp., Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood is heading to Japan to meet with company President Akio Toyoda. LaHood said the department was examining 500,000 internal documents recently turned over by the automaker in hopes of determining when it began to withhold crucial information about defects in its vehicles. The government has already fined Toyota a record $16.4 million for failing to disclose safety problems related to sudden acceleration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said Friday that he plans to stay mayor until the end of his term June 30, an announcement aimed at ending talk of him taking a post as President Obama's secretary of Transportation. "I have said many times that I will be focused on my job as mayor of Los Angeles until 11:59 and 59 seconds on June 30, 2013," Villaraigosa said in a prepared statement. "I am flattered and humbled by the speculation that has included my name for a possible Cabinet secretary position, but I am firmly committed to remaining in L.A. and finishing my term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2012 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration, which has been urging California to push through growing opposition to its bullet train project, asked Congress on Monday for nearly $35 billion in passenger rail funding over the next five years. The request in its fiscal 2013 budget includes $1 billion for next year and nearly $8 billion in 2018, a massive funding plan that faces difficult odds of getting through Congress. Last year, the Republican-controlled House and even the Democratic-led Senate slashed a similar request and left no new money for any high-speed rail project.
WORLD
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Egyptian state media Monday published the names of 43 people accused in a politically explosive investigation of pro-democracy groups, saying they are suspected of receiving illegal funding with the aim of destabilizing the country's national security. The 19 Americans on the list of those to be prosecuted on charges of violating foreign funding laws included Sam LaHood, son of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood and country director for the Washington-based International Republican Institute, and Charles Dunne, the Mideast program director for Freedom House, a research and advocacy organization.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, a former lawmaker from Illinois and the last Republican left in President Obama's first-term Cabinet, announced Tuesday he was stepping down once a replacement was confirmed. Among those mentioned as a possible successor is Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, whose second and final term ends June 30. He has sought to establish himself as a national leader on transportation and made improving L.A.'s transit system a cornerstone of his tenure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2012 | By Ralph Vartabedian and Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration threatened California on Thursday with rescinding $3.3 billion in federal grants to start construction of a bullet train if the Legislature does not act by June to appropriate the state's share of funding. In a series of meetings with key lawmakers in Sacramento, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said that the recent proposal by state Senate leaders to delay a $2.7-billion decision on the high-speed rail project until August is not acceptable. "We need the Legislature to make the strongest commitment possible," LaHood said in an interview.
WORLD
March 1, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
  Egypt'sdecision Wednesday to allow seven Americans accused of instigating unrest to leave the country followed weeks of intense negotiations and signaled a possible end to the worst diplomatic crisis between Washington and Cairo in decades. The lifting of the travel ban on the Americans, including Sam LaHood, son of U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, stems a precipitous free fall in relations between Washington and one of its closest allies. There are bruised feelings on both sides, but Egyptian and U.S. officials appeared anxious to avoid the rupture of a relationship that could alter the dynamics of the Middle East.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2012 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration, which has been urging California to push through growing opposition to its bullet train project, asked Congress on Monday for nearly $35 billion in passenger rail funding over the next five years. The request in its fiscal 2013 budget includes $1 billion for next year and nearly $8 billion in 2018, a massive funding plan that faces difficult odds of getting through Congress. Last year, the Republican-controlled House and even the Democratic-led Senate slashed a similar request and left no new money for any high-speed rail project.
WORLD
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Egyptian state media Monday published the names of 43 people accused in a politically explosive investigation of pro-democracy groups, saying they are suspected of receiving illegal funding with the aim of destabilizing the country's national security. The 19 Americans on the list of those to be prosecuted on charges of violating foreign funding laws included Sam LaHood, son of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood and country director for the Washington-based International Republican Institute, and Charles Dunne, the Mideast program director for Freedom House, a research and advocacy organization.
WORLD
January 26, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
  The son of a U.S. Cabinetofficial and other Americans working for a democracy rights group have been stopped from leaving Cairo as part of a criminal investigation of foreign funding of nongovernmental organizations operating in Egypt. The move is certain to intensify a diplomatic rift between Cairo and Washington over American aid to human rights and democracy groups that are viewed with suspicion by Egypt's military rulers. The U.S. government said it was outraged by recent police raids on the Egyptian offices of three American-backed organizations.
WORLD
March 1, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
  Egypt'sdecision Wednesday to allow seven Americans accused of instigating unrest to leave the country followed weeks of intense negotiations and signaled a possible end to the worst diplomatic crisis between Washington and Cairo in decades. The lifting of the travel ban on the Americans, including Sam LaHood, son of U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, stems a precipitous free fall in relations between Washington and one of its closest allies. There are bruised feelings on both sides, but Egyptian and U.S. officials appeared anxious to avoid the rupture of a relationship that could alter the dynamics of the Middle East.
WORLD
January 26, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
  The son of a U.S. Cabinetofficial and other Americans working for a democracy rights group have been stopped from leaving Cairo as part of a criminal investigation of foreign funding of nongovernmental organizations operating in Egypt. The move is certain to intensify a diplomatic rift between Cairo and Washington over American aid to human rights and democracy groups that are viewed with suspicion by Egypt's military rulers. The U.S. government said it was outraged by recent police raids on the Egyptian offices of three American-backed organizations.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Katherine Skiba
Ray LaHood, who heads the U.S. Department of Transportation, said today he is staying in that job for one term only and will not run for public office again. LaHood, 65, is a Republican from Peoria, Ill., who served in Congress for 14 years ending in January 2009, when he became a Cabinet secretary for President Obama. He was not a candidate for reelection to Congress in 2008. LaHood, whose name is sometimes mentioned for posts such as Illinois governor, said: "I'm not running for public office anymore," and specifically ruled out a run for governor.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2011 | Times staff and wire reports
— Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood announced Wednesday that two air traffic controllers had been fired — one for sleeping on the job, the other for questionable guidance of a jetliner over Florida. They had been among nine suspended during Federal Aviation Administration investigations into a rash of incidents involving controllers, including several who were sleeping and one who was watching a movie when he was supposed to be directing air traffic. Separately, the FAA said aircraft carrying the first lady or vice president would receive a higher level of scrutiny from controllers since the aborted landing of a plane carrying Michelle Obama this week.
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