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Ray Liotta

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Corrina, Corrina," 7-year-old Molly Singer (Tina Majorino) reacts to the death of her mother by becoming mute. Her father, Manny (Ray Liotta), has to hold down a job writing jingles for an ad agency so he interviews for a housekeeper and, after the usual comic mishaps, ends up with the distinctly overqualified Corrina Washington (Whoopi Goldberg).
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
One of the most intriguing things about the new crime drama "Pawn" is Michael Chiklis' British accent. It's not that it's particularly bad or good, but every time he speaks - which is a lot - it does make you wonder why ? The movie is a bit like that accent and joins the pantheon of mildly entertaining thrillers having a go at the domino logic we've seen so often in these movies, starting with that classic flaw in the criminal mind that makes two-bit thugs think they can outsmart compromised cops.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1990 | NIKKI FINKE
You look at Ray Liotta, and you think that this guy with the premature 5 o'clock shadow and the dangerous eyes would just as soon shove his heaping bowl of bow-tie pasta in your face during lunch as force himself to be pleasant for the next few hours. You think that, and you are wrong. In fact, he's as agreeable as a new employee on his first day at work. You don't like avocado. Liotta says he doesn't like avocado. You appear fidgety. Liotta says he's fidgety. You don't smoke.
NEWS
September 21, 2006 | Scott Collins
"Smith" got into a rumble with Dick Wolf on Tuesday night, and Wolf won. A new CBS drama starring Ray Liotta as a criminal antihero, "Smith" opened with a soft 10.7 million viewers, according to early data from Nielsen Media Research. That lagged behind the eighth-season debut of NBC's "Law & Order: SVU" (14.4 million), from executive producer Wolf, as well as the third season roll-out of ABC's "Boston Legal" (11.6 million), which benefited from a two-hour "Dancing With the Stars" lead-in (18.
NEWS
September 21, 2006 | Scott Collins
"Smith" got into a rumble with Dick Wolf on Tuesday night, and Wolf won. A new CBS drama starring Ray Liotta as a criminal antihero, "Smith" opened with a soft 10.7 million viewers, according to early data from Nielsen Media Research. That lagged behind the eighth-season debut of NBC's "Law & Order: SVU" (14.4 million), from executive producer Wolf, as well as the third season roll-out of ABC's "Boston Legal" (11.6 million), which benefited from a two-hour "Dancing With the Stars" lead-in (18.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1986 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Liotta, a newcomer, nearly walks off with his sections of the film. --Vincent Canby, New York Times Liotta is, if anything, too effective as Ray--he's downright monstrous, and the intensity of the scare is sometimes more than "Something Wild" can stand. --Paul Attanasio, Washington Post . . . a first-class performance by electrifying newcomer Ray Liotta.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh off HBO's "The Rat Pack," in which he played Frank Sinatra, Ray Liotta turns up in a terrific neo-noir, "Phoenix," which opens today at the NuWilshire with scant fanfare--but which packs a wallop. It was written by Eddie Richey and directed by Danny Cannon, who know exactly what they're doing when they let their picture sneak up on you.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2006 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"SMITH," a new series about a master criminal and the crimes he masterfully commits (overlooking a dead body or two), opens big.
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
Ray LIOTTA is a very bad man. He can hardly believe it himself, watching what vaguely looks and sounds like the actor stomping across a TV screen, a dark-haired wiseguy with a tough Jersey sneer, wreaking havoc in a Florida resort town. He's doing terrible things, stealing cars, firing weapons, igniting gang warfare and battling local cops and FBI men. Then there are warnings and insults, shouted in Liotta's distinctive bark: "Get out of the car!" or "You're not a cop, you're a robot!"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2006 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"SMITH," a new series about a master criminal and the crimes he masterfully commits (overlooking a dead body or two), opens big.
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
Ray LIOTTA is a very bad man. He can hardly believe it himself, watching what vaguely looks and sounds like the actor stomping across a TV screen, a dark-haired wiseguy with a tough Jersey sneer, wreaking havoc in a Florida resort town. He's doing terrible things, stealing cars, firing weapons, igniting gang warfare and battling local cops and FBI men. Then there are warnings and insults, shouted in Liotta's distinctive bark: "Get out of the car!" or "You're not a cop, you're a robot!"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2002 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
Tommy can't swim. It's his one weakness, an unlikely flaw for the tough guy with the Ray Liotta voice, this criminal for hire, a survivor of mobster shoot-outs and exploding sports cars. But one wrong step into the drink and he's helpless as an infant, sinking to oblivion, hired muscle asleep with the fishes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh off HBO's "The Rat Pack," in which he played Frank Sinatra, Ray Liotta turns up in a terrific neo-noir, "Phoenix," which opens today at the NuWilshire with scant fanfare--but which packs a wallop. It was written by Eddie Richey and directed by Danny Cannon, who know exactly what they're doing when they let their picture sneak up on you.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Corrina, Corrina," 7-year-old Molly Singer (Tina Majorino) reacts to the death of her mother by becoming mute. Her father, Manny (Ray Liotta), has to hold down a job writing jingles for an ad agency so he interviews for a housekeeper and, after the usual comic mishaps, ends up with the distinctly overqualified Corrina Washington (Whoopi Goldberg).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1990 | NIKKI FINKE
You look at Ray Liotta, and you think that this guy with the premature 5 o'clock shadow and the dangerous eyes would just as soon shove his heaping bowl of bow-tie pasta in your face during lunch as force himself to be pleasant for the next few hours. You think that, and you are wrong. In fact, he's as agreeable as a new employee on his first day at work. You don't like avocado. Liotta says he doesn't like avocado. You appear fidgety. Liotta says he's fidgety. You don't smoke.
MAGAZINE
January 15, 1989 | Mary Rourke, Mary Rourke is a Times staff writer
Black shirts, the kind that give a man an air of intrigue, are under reconstruction. Far from "basic," the new models have so many extras they make the others look as plain as starter homes. There's the playful black shirt with silver airplanes for buttons; the fancy-front model with black satin braid; the romantic rendition covered with red roses. This new development in menswear has a counterpart of sorts in home furniture. Consider an armchair made of corrugated cardboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2002 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
Tommy can't swim. It's his one weakness, an unlikely flaw for the tough guy with the Ray Liotta voice, this criminal for hire, a survivor of mobster shoot-outs and exploding sports cars. But one wrong step into the drink and he's helpless as an infant, sinking to oblivion, hired muscle asleep with the fishes.
MAGAZINE
January 15, 1989 | Mary Rourke, Mary Rourke is a Times staff writer
Black shirts, the kind that give a man an air of intrigue, are under reconstruction. Far from "basic," the new models have so many extras they make the others look as plain as starter homes. There's the playful black shirt with silver airplanes for buttons; the fancy-front model with black satin braid; the romantic rendition covered with red roses. This new development in menswear has a counterpart of sorts in home furniture. Consider an armchair made of corrugated cardboard.
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