Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRay Loynd
IN THE NEWS

Ray Loynd

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 26, 1992
I suppose there is no point in arguing with the content of Ray Loynd's vitriolic review (Times, July 16) of the "One-Act Festival" at the Basement Theatre, since everyone is entitled to an opinion. (One might hope for a more-informed opinion. For example, his objection to the title "Marble Medusa" misses the whole point of the last play, the clear references to the Perseus legend.) However, his logic escapes me completely. It makes no sense to decry the low level of small theatrical activity in Pasadena, while in the same breath characterizing an attempt to do something about it with such comments as "excruciatingly inaccessible," "tortured and torturous experiments," "thankless roles," "pompously titled," "wretched play," etc. How can such a diatribe serve to encourage further endeavors?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 11, 1995
Ray Loynd, author, theater critic and entertainment writer whose free-lance articles frequently appeared in The Times, has died at the age of 64. Loynd, who died Monday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, underwent major heart surgery last year and a kidney transplant this year and had suffered from cancer. He was entertainment editor of the now-defunct Los Angeles Herald Examiner from 1972 until 1978 and had also written for the entertainment trade publications Hollywood Reporter and Daily Variety.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 23, 1992
I suppose there is no point in arguing with the content of Ray Loynd's vitriolic review (Times, July 16) of the "One-Act Festival" at the Basement Theatre, since everyone is entitled to an opinion. (One might hope for a more-informed opinion. For example, his objection to the title "Marble Medusa" misses the whole point of the last play, the clear references to the Perseus legend.) However, his logic escapes me completely. It makes no sense to decry the low level of small theatrical activity in Pasadena, while in the same breath characterizing an attempt to do something about it with such comments as "excruciatingly inaccessible," "tortured and torturous experiments," "thankless roles," "pompously titled," "wretched play," etc. How can such a diatribe serve to encourage further endeavors?
NEWS
March 31, 1994
There are, goodness knows, many more important issues to discuss than a theatrical review. However, I cannot sit idly by and permit such a glaring error as that made by your critic Ray Loynd in his piece on the Whittier-La Mirada Music Theatre Assn.'s "Camelot." (Times, March 24). Mr. Loynd writes, "You can be sure there was no dog in the Richard Burton-Julie Andrews Broadway original." Au contraire, Mr. Loynd. The part of Horrid (his name, not his description) is clearly written into the libretto of the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1993
Ray Loynd may be competent enough to write about productions of forgettable contemporary plays, but he is totally out of his depth in reviewing the "obscure German classic 'Nathan the Wise' " by Lessing ("Revival of German Classic at Harman," March 19). Obscure indeed--just as obscure as Diderot, Fielding, Goldoni, Wieland and the other great spirits of the Era of Enlightenment. If this world is as foreign to a critic as it obviously is to Loynd, the famous tale of the three rings will be "too childlike," the characters "stickboard," the play "a curiosity piece."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1993
As a founding member of Incline, the Theatre Group, an actor in our AIDS play "Raft of the Medusa" and one of the driving forces behind the fund-raising for our show, I was deeply shocked and saddened by the exclusion of Incline from your article. The play, written by Joe Pintauro, ran for 16 weeks under the Los Angeles 99-seat theater plan. None of the actors were paid, nor were any of the support staff. Many of us dedicated a year of our lives to it. I make this point only to emphasize our belief in, and commitment to, the hopeful message of the play--and more important, the messages and information we gave during our free "teen nights" every Wednesday, when members of various AIDS organizations spoke to the kids about prevention.
NEWS
March 31, 1994
There are, goodness knows, many more important issues to discuss than a theatrical review. However, I cannot sit idly by and permit such a glaring error as that made by your critic Ray Loynd in his piece on the Whittier-La Mirada Music Theatre Assn.'s "Camelot." (Times, March 24). Mr. Loynd writes, "You can be sure there was no dog in the Richard Burton-Julie Andrews Broadway original." Au contraire, Mr. Loynd. The part of Horrid (his name, not his description) is clearly written into the libretto of the show.
NEWS
October 11, 1995
Ray Loynd, author, theater critic and entertainment writer whose free-lance articles frequently appeared in The Times, has died at the age of 64. Loynd, who died Monday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, underwent major heart surgery last year and a kidney transplant this year and had suffered from cancer. He was entertainment editor of the now-defunct Los Angeles Herald Examiner from 1972 until 1978 and had also written for the entertainment trade publications Hollywood Reporter and Daily Variety.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1994
Many thanks to Ray Loynd for calling our attention to Hallmark Hall of Fame's peerless production of Anne Tyler's "Breathing Lessons" ("Garner, Woodward in Sweet 'Lessons,' " Feb. 5). We heartily agree that screenwriter Robert W. Lenski and director John Erman deserve kudos for being able to faithfully adapt this Pulitzer-winning novel to the special demands of commercial TV. How refreshing to view a warm, humorous, human drama devoid of violence, sensationalism and sexploitation! PEGGY and TOM REDLER, Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1993
I disagree adamantly with Ray Loynd's review of the one-man show "Meet Charles Dickens" ("One-Man 'Charles Dickens' at West Coast Ensemble a Bit Musty," Dec. 22). Actor Philip King Kroopf brought Dickens to life and made him a very human figure. Especially poignant was when the Dickens character reflects upon the denial of his knighthood because he left his wife for a young actress. Dickens is so much more than a year-end tradition, and Kroopf's presentation brought out the depth and breadth of an author for all seasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1993
As a founding member of Incline, the Theatre Group, an actor in our AIDS play "Raft of the Medusa" and one of the driving forces behind the fund-raising for our show, I was deeply shocked and saddened by the exclusion of Incline from your article. The play, written by Joe Pintauro, ran for 16 weeks under the Los Angeles 99-seat theater plan. None of the actors were paid, nor were any of the support staff. Many of us dedicated a year of our lives to it. I make this point only to emphasize our belief in, and commitment to, the hopeful message of the play--and more important, the messages and information we gave during our free "teen nights" every Wednesday, when members of various AIDS organizations spoke to the kids about prevention.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1993
Ray Loynd may be competent enough to write about productions of forgettable contemporary plays, but he is totally out of his depth in reviewing the "obscure German classic 'Nathan the Wise' " by Lessing ("Revival of German Classic at Harman," March 19). Obscure indeed--just as obscure as Diderot, Fielding, Goldoni, Wieland and the other great spirits of the Era of Enlightenment. If this world is as foreign to a critic as it obviously is to Loynd, the famous tale of the three rings will be "too childlike," the characters "stickboard," the play "a curiosity piece."
NEWS
July 26, 1992
I suppose there is no point in arguing with the content of Ray Loynd's vitriolic review (Times, July 16) of the "One-Act Festival" at the Basement Theatre, since everyone is entitled to an opinion. (One might hope for a more-informed opinion. For example, his objection to the title "Marble Medusa" misses the whole point of the last play, the clear references to the Perseus legend.) However, his logic escapes me completely. It makes no sense to decry the low level of small theatrical activity in Pasadena, while in the same breath characterizing an attempt to do something about it with such comments as "excruciatingly inaccessible," "tortured and torturous experiments," "thankless roles," "pompously titled," "wretched play," etc. How can such a diatribe serve to encourage further endeavors?
NEWS
July 23, 1992
I suppose there is no point in arguing with the content of Ray Loynd's vitriolic review (Times, July 16) of the "One-Act Festival" at the Basement Theatre, since everyone is entitled to an opinion. (One might hope for a more-informed opinion. For example, his objection to the title "Marble Medusa" misses the whole point of the last play, the clear references to the Perseus legend.) However, his logic escapes me completely. It makes no sense to decry the low level of small theatrical activity in Pasadena, while in the same breath characterizing an attempt to do something about it with such comments as "excruciatingly inaccessible," "tortured and torturous experiments," "thankless roles," "pompously titled," "wretched play," etc. How can such a diatribe serve to encourage further endeavors?
BUSINESS
January 19, 1991
In the Jan. 5 review of the PBS show "A Room of One's Own," Ray Loynd made an allusion to the disgraceful period in which women writers found it necessary to take male pen names in order to get published. The example he used was other British women writers such as George Sand. George Sand was the pen name of Amandine Aurore Lucie Dudevant (nee Dupin), a French writer.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|