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Ray Mack

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SPORTS
May 6, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Ray Mack, a pitcher in the Atlanta Braves' farm system, was being sought in Riviera Beach, Fla., after he allegedly shot and killed a prostitute who refused to give back $20. Police said that Mack and two other men picked up two prostitutes early Saturday, and that witnesses said Mack shot the woman in the head when she refused to return his money.
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SPORTS
May 6, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Ray Mack, a pitcher in the Atlanta Braves' farm system, was being sought in Riviera Beach, Fla., after he allegedly shot and killed a prostitute who refused to give back $20. Police said that Mack and two other men picked up two prostitutes early Saturday, and that witnesses said Mack shot the woman in the head when she refused to return his money.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1996 | DANIEL CARIAGA
The intricacies and subtleties in Schubert's great song-cycle, "Die schone Mullerin," are best revealed in an intimate room bordered by four walls. That said, one still had to admire Jonathan Mack's authoritative and probing performance, presented in the semi-outdoors Saturday night. Assisted solidly by pianist Vicki Ray, Mack closed a third summer season by the growing Southwest Chamber Music Society in the Loggia of the Huntington Art Gallery in San Marino.
SPORTS
April 16, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since 1876, there have been 222 no-hit games pitched in the major leagues. Only one was achieved on opening day. It happened 59 years ago today, when Bob Feller did it in Chicago's Comiskey Park, but it took a great defensive play to preserve Feller's effort. With two out in the ninth and 14,000 fans standing and cheering, Cleveland second baseman Ray Mack dived to knock down Taft Wright's line drive and threw him out at first base by a step.
SPORTS
May 26, 1987
Philadelphia is down, 3-1, as the Stanley Cup finals return to Edmonton, and Flyer goalie Ron Hextall was asked about his team's chances. "It's an uphill battle, there's no doubt about it," he said. "Our backs are to the wall. It's going to be tough, we know that. But we are going to take it one game at a time." With that, Hextall set a Stanley Cup record for cliches that might never be broken. Would-you-believe-it dept.
SPORTS
April 9, 1990 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the second inning of the American League's 1940 season opener between the Chicago White Sox and Cleveland Indians, Bob Feller walked the bases loaded and was visited on the mound by Oscar Vitt, the Cleveland manager. "I was wild, on the verge of walking myself out of the game," Feller said in recollection the other day. "Oscar asked how I felt and I told him that I thought I could get out of it. "If it had been later in the game or, maybe, later in the season he might have taken me out."
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