Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRay Magliozzi
IN THE NEWS

Ray Magliozzi

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
They were a couple of auto mechanics with a pronounced Boston brogue and, improbably, degrees from MIT. They hadn't a clue how to perform on radio, much less public radio. So Tom and Ray Magliozzi just decided to have a good time. The result was "Car Talk," which shattered the perception that public radio is inaccessible to the masses and became National Public Radio's top-rated weekend show. "They never developed that affect of sonorousness and seriousness and gravitas public radio is known for," said the show's executive producer, the man Tom and Ray would identify on air as Doug "Not-a-Slave-to-Fashion" Berman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
They were a couple of auto mechanics with a pronounced Boston brogue and, improbably, degrees from MIT. They hadn't a clue how to perform on radio, much less public radio. So Tom and Ray Magliozzi just decided to have a good time. The result was "Car Talk," which shattered the perception that public radio is inaccessible to the masses and became National Public Radio's top-rated weekend show. "They never developed that affect of sonorousness and seriousness and gravitas public radio is known for," said the show's executive producer, the man Tom and Ray would identify on air as Doug "Not-a-Slave-to-Fashion" Berman.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
June 8, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
"Click and Clack," the mechanics-turned-comedians who launched one of the most unlikely -- and most beloved -- talk shows in radio history, have decided that 35 years at the wheel is enough. Brothers Tom and Ray Magliozzi announced Thursday afternoon that they will no longer record new episodes of the weekly call-in series, but it will continue to live on in syndication. The loss of the popular public radio show is a blow to NPR, and its listeners. The show was one of NPR's powerhouse performers, in part because it appealed to such a diverse audience.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
"Click and Clack," the mechanics-turned-comedians who launched one of the most unlikely -- and most beloved -- talk shows in radio history, have decided that 35 years at the wheel is enough. Brothers Tom and Ray Magliozzi announced Thursday afternoon that they will no longer record new episodes of the weekly call-in series, but it will continue to live on in syndication. The loss of the popular public radio show is a blow to NPR, and its listeners. The show was one of NPR's powerhouse performers, in part because it appealed to such a diverse audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moments before they were scheduled to go on the air at the studios of WBUR-FM here, Tom and Ray Magliozzi were sitting at a conference table, poring over the latest truckload of mail. Tom was eating a sweet roll, and large crumbs had established themselves in his thick gray beard. Abruptly, he looked up with what at first sounded suspiciously like a Serious Question. "Is Pro Bono Sonny Bono's other child?"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Megan Garvey
"Car Talk," the venerable NPR program featuring brothers Ray and Tom Magliozzi, a.k.a. Click and Clack, is calling it quits -- at least as far as live shows go. The Boston-based brothers, who turned their experience as mechanics into one of public radio's most beloved programs,  informed listeners Friday morning with their signature winking style in a blog post titled: "Time to Get Even Lazier. " "The good news is that, despite our general incompetence, we actually remembered to hit the 'record' button every week for the last 25 years," Tom Magliozzi said, adding that the show will continue in reruns pulled from more than 1,200 programs, beginning in October.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1995 | ADAM S. BAUMAN
America Online Friday, 8 p.m: Michael Crichton, who wrote "Jurassic Park," talks about his latest book, "The Lost World" in an on-line conference. Keyword: Centerstage Monday, 5 p.m: Pop singer Judy Collins talks about her career and answers questions. Keyword: Centerstage * Compuserve Thursday, 7 p.m: Author Ted Allrich, who wrote "The On-line Investor, reveals his investment strategies in an on-line conference. Go CONVENTION Tuesday, 5 p.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2001 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Reading Rainbow" doesn't have the high profile of other PBS children's shows, but this quietly fine series, 18 seasons later, is as fresh as ever, introducing viewers to the joy of books with entertaining show-and-tell informality and the warmth of its enthusiastic host, actor-director LeVar Burton. Friday's episode is one of the best yet.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2010
SERIES Survivors: The British TV series from the '70s, based on a book by Terry Nation, is updated in this version that tells the story of a world in which a virus has killed almost 90% of the population. Julie Graham, Max Beesley, Paterson Joseph, Zoe Tapper and Nikki Amuka-Bird star (5 and 8 p.m. BBC America). Austin City Limits: Performing in this new episode, Them Crooked Vultures features Josh Homme from Queens of the Stone Age, Dave Grohl from the Foo Fighters and Led Zeppelin's John Paul Jones (11 p.m. KLCS)
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jetting home from a too-short trip to New York City, we were shocked to read in an airline magazine that Americans get the shaft when it comes to vacation days.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moments before they were scheduled to go on the air at the studios of WBUR-FM here, Tom and Ray Magliozzi were sitting at a conference table, poring over the latest truckload of mail. Tom was eating a sweet roll, and large crumbs had established themselves in his thick gray beard. Abruptly, he looked up with what at first sounded suspiciously like a Serious Question. "Is Pro Bono Sonny Bono's other child?"
NEWS
July 7, 1986 | ANN HEROLD
--When their do-it-yourself car-repair shop was a bust, the Magliozzi brothers started a radio talk show that is loved even by people who own nothing faster than a bicycle. Tom and Ray Magliozzi seem to know nearly every aberration in every make and model of car that ever rolled down an assembly line. And that seems to have made "Car Talk," with about 11,500 listeners, one of the most popular shows on the National Public Radio affiliate WBUR-FM in Boston.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2000 | MARGO KAUFMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When my editor assigned this story, she asked what I knew about weekend radio. "Not much," I said, though I felt an odd twinge in my gut. Sure, I've scanned the dial on a Saturday or Sunday and become riveted by strange conversational snippets. For example: "My St. Augustine grass was invaded by clover." "What do I do with a 5-pound can of crab that's been in my freezer for the past eight years?" "Am I the only one who thinks that Alan Greenspan looks like Woody Allen?"
Los Angeles Times Articles
|