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Ray Malavasi

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December 19, 1987 | RICH ROBERTS
About 300 people, including Raider owner Al Davis and Dodger Manager Tom Lasorda, attended funeral services for former Ram Coach Ray Malavasi at Huntington Beach Friday. Malavasi, 57, died of a heart attack Tuesday. He was the Rams' defensive coordinator under Chuck Knox from 1973 through 1977 and head coach from 1978 through 1982.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1996
The son of the late former Rams coach Ray Malavasi was arrested early Saturday morning on child endangerment charges after allegedly leaving his two young children alone while he got drunk inside a bar, police said. Dennis Malavasi, 39, was drinking inside of Hy-Roys bar, 5050 Heil Ave., after midnight when a someone called police to report that the man's 7-year-old son had been left alone in a car parked outside the bar. Police found Malavasi, a resident of Huntington Beach, inside of the bar.
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SPORTS
October 4, 1986
Ram fans aren't surprised by the team's unwillingness to sign Henry Ellard. The owner who gave us Ray Malavasi now delivers John Shaw. JOHN A. TOWNSEND Ventura
SPORTS
January 31, 1988 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Times Staff Writer
Ray Malavasi, 57, died last month of a heart attack on the seventh floor of an Orange County federal court building, the last place on Earth he wanted to be. His final years and days were almost unreal ones, his life having become a litany of subpoenas, case loggings, depositions and depressions. A Super Bowl coach with the Rams only eight years ago this month, Malavasi died alone, virtually penniless. He was separated from his wife, Mary, and separated, really, from reality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1996
The son of the late former Rams coach Ray Malavasi was arrested early Saturday morning on child endangerment charges after allegedly leaving his two young children alone while he got drunk inside a bar, police said. Dennis Malavasi, 39, was drinking inside of Hy-Roys bar, 5050 Heil Ave., after midnight when a someone called police to report that the man's 7-year-old son had been left alone in a car parked outside the bar. Police found Malavasi, a resident of Huntington Beach, inside of the bar.
SPORTS
December 17, 1987
A Scripture service for former Ram coach Ray Malavasi will be held at 7 tonight at S.S. Simon and Jude Catholic Church, 20444 Magnolia Blvd., Huntington Beach. A funeral mass will be held Friday at 10 a.m. at the church, followed by burial at Pacific View cemetery in Newport Beach. The service and mass are open to the public. Malavasi, 57, died of a heart attack Tuesday in Santa Ana. He was head coach of the Rams from 1978 to 1982 and led the team to its only Super Bowl appearance in 1979.
SPORTS
September 25, 1985 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Coach John Robinson suggested Tuesday that Eric Dickerson got 150 yards and three touchdowns largely on his own efforts in the Rams' 35-24 victory at Seattle Monday night. "I was not impressed with our blocking," Robinson said. "We had some guys that were watching Eric run. "After watching the films I'm less impressed with how well we played than how hard we played. It wasn't a perfect game. We could have dominated more than we did."
SPORTS
October 22, 1985
First, Tom Lasorda pitches to Jack Clark with first base open. Then, Dick Howser leaves Dan Quisenberry in the bullpen and lets Terry Pendleton do a number on Charlie Leibrandt. The St. Louis Cardinals really don't deserve that much help, but it's nothing new. It started in 1926, the first year they appeared in the Fall Classic.
SPORTS
December 16, 1987 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Ray Malavasi, the only coach to take the Rams to the Super Bowl, collapsed and died of a heart attack Tuesday in Santa Ana. Malavasi, 57, was in the cafeteria on the seventh floor of the federal building when stricken. Santa Ana Fire Dept. paramedics were summoned at 1:59 p.m. and found him in full cardiac arrest, according to Battalion Chief Tim Graber.
SPORTS
January 31, 1988 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Times Staff Writer
Ray Malavasi, 57, died last month of a heart attack on the seventh floor of an Orange County federal court building, the last place on Earth he wanted to be. His final years and days were almost unreal ones, his life having become a litany of subpoenas, case loggings, depositions and depressions. A Super Bowl coach with the Rams only eight years ago this month, Malavasi died alone, virtually penniless. He was separated from his wife, Mary, and separated, really, from reality.
SPORTS
December 19, 1987 | RICH ROBERTS
About 300 people, including Raider owner Al Davis and Dodger Manager Tom Lasorda, attended funeral services for former Ram Coach Ray Malavasi at Huntington Beach Friday. Malavasi, 57, died of a heart attack Tuesday. He was the Rams' defensive coordinator under Chuck Knox from 1973 through 1977 and head coach from 1978 through 1982.
SPORTS
December 17, 1987
A Scripture service for former Ram coach Ray Malavasi will be held at 7 tonight at S.S. Simon and Jude Catholic Church, 20444 Magnolia Blvd., Huntington Beach. A funeral mass will be held Friday at 10 a.m. at the church, followed by burial at Pacific View cemetery in Newport Beach. The service and mass are open to the public. Malavasi, 57, died of a heart attack Tuesday in Santa Ana. He was head coach of the Rams from 1978 to 1982 and led the team to its only Super Bowl appearance in 1979.
SPORTS
December 16, 1987 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Ray Malavasi, the only coach to take the Rams to the Super Bowl, collapsed and died of a heart attack Tuesday in Santa Ana. Malavasi, 57, was in the cafeteria on the seventh floor of the federal building when stricken. Santa Ana Fire Dept. paramedics were summoned at 1:59 p.m. and found him in full cardiac arrest, according to Battalion Chief Tim Graber.
SPORTS
November 7, 1986 | MARC APPLEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Tom Dahms' friends remember his days as a lineman at San Diego High and San Diego State. And they remember his days as a player with the National Football League champion Rams of 1951. And they remember his days as an assistant coach with the Super Bowl champion Oakland Raiders of 1977. They don't remember much about Dahms since then, because Tom Dahms had seemingly disappeared from football.
SPORTS
October 4, 1986
Ram fans aren't surprised by the team's unwillingness to sign Henry Ellard. The owner who gave us Ray Malavasi now delivers John Shaw. JOHN A. TOWNSEND Ventura
SPORTS
October 22, 1985
First, Tom Lasorda pitches to Jack Clark with first base open. Then, Dick Howser leaves Dan Quisenberry in the bullpen and lets Terry Pendleton do a number on Charlie Leibrandt. The St. Louis Cardinals really don't deserve that much help, but it's nothing new. It started in 1926, the first year they appeared in the Fall Classic.
SPORTS
November 7, 1986 | MARC APPLEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Tom Dahms' friends remember his days as a lineman at San Diego High and San Diego State. And they remember his days as a player with the National Football League champion Rams of 1951. And they remember his days as an assistant coach with the Super Bowl champion Oakland Raiders of 1977. They don't remember much about Dahms since then, because Tom Dahms had seemingly disappeared from football.
SPORTS
February 6, 1988
I was shocked and dismayed to read your Jan. 31 profile on Coach Ray Malavasi. On Super Bowl Sunday, could The Times not think of a better subject than a tragically deceased former coach? The Malavasi family has suffered enough with the tragic loss of a loved one. To inflict this cruel and inhumane profile on them and your readers is beneath a paper of The Times' caliber. MAUREEN MITCHELL Huntington Beach
SPORTS
September 25, 1985 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Coach John Robinson suggested Tuesday that Eric Dickerson got 150 yards and three touchdowns largely on his own efforts in the Rams' 35-24 victory at Seattle Monday night. "I was not impressed with our blocking," Robinson said. "We had some guys that were watching Eric run. "After watching the films I'm less impressed with how well we played than how hard we played. It wasn't a perfect game. We could have dominated more than we did."
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