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Ray Mancini

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October 2, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
We are a month away from the 30th anniversary of an ugly moment in an oft-ugly sport. Let's hark back. There once was a tough kid from a tough town. His name was Ray Mancini and his town was Youngstown, Ohio. Ray, like his town, settled many issues with his fists. His nickname, perfect for his chosen profession of boxing, was "Boom Boom. " But he hadn't really chosen his profession, nor his nickname. His father was a fighter whose nickname had also been Boom Boom, and with the advent of his son's career, became just Boom.
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NEWS
November 24, 2012 | Lance Pugmire
Hector “Macho” Camacho, a former three-division boxing champion who had 88 professional fights against a who's who of legendary opponents stretching from Ray Mancini (whom he defeated in 1989) to Oscar De La Hoya (who beat him by decision in 1997), has died. He was 50. Camacho was pronounced dead Saturday after being shot in the head four days earlier while seated in a car outside a bar in Bayamon, Puerto Rico. He was taken off of life support after undergoing cardiac arrest early Saturday, Dr. Ernesto Torres, director of the Centro Medico trauma center in Puerto Rico, told the Associated Press.
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SPORTS
April 20, 1986 | JOHN PINE, Reuters
Ray Mancini retired last year at the age of 24, having achieved his childhood dream of international fame and wealth--and gradually grew depressed. Mancini, who held the World Boxing Assn. lightweight title for two years and is better known as Boom Boom, had everything he ever wanted but, for the first time in his storybook life, found himself overcome by a "deep funk." "I was in a bad state of depression, and I couldn't understand it because I've always been an up guy.
SPORTS
October 2, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
We are a month away from the 30th anniversary of an ugly moment in an oft-ugly sport. Let's hark back. There once was a tough kid from a tough town. His name was Ray Mancini and his town was Youngstown, Ohio. Ray, like his town, settled many issues with his fists. His nickname, perfect for his chosen profession of boxing, was "Boom Boom. " But he hadn't really chosen his profession, nor his nickname. His father was a fighter whose nickname had also been Boom Boom, and with the advent of his son's career, became just Boom.
NEWS
November 24, 2012 | Lance Pugmire
Hector “Macho” Camacho, a former three-division boxing champion who had 88 professional fights against a who's who of legendary opponents stretching from Ray Mancini (whom he defeated in 1989) to Oscar De La Hoya (who beat him by decision in 1997), has died. He was 50. Camacho was pronounced dead Saturday after being shot in the head four days earlier while seated in a car outside a bar in Bayamon, Puerto Rico. He was taken off of life support after undergoing cardiac arrest early Saturday, Dr. Ernesto Torres, director of the Centro Medico trauma center in Puerto Rico, told the Associated Press.
SPORTS
February 7, 1985 | JIM MURRAY
Who or what would you guess a Livingstone Bramble is? A character out of Dickens? A trust officer at the local bank? A village in New Hampshire? A stretch of gorse and heather on the high road in Scotland? A coxswain for the Harvard eight? A railroad depot in the Cotswolds in England? There's no doubt what a Boom Boom Mancini is. It's a second-generation pug out of Youngstown, Ohio, something the tabloid press would tab a left-hook artist.
SPORTS
January 6, 1985 | Associated Press
The day after Livingstone Bramble stopped Ray Mancini in the 14th round to win the World Boxing Assn. lightweight championship last June 1, efforts began to arrange a rematch. It was a task not easily accomplished. "This was the only fight we wanted," Dave Wolf, Mancini's manager, said at the press conference announcing Mancini-Bramble II at Reno, Nev. Feb. 16. "But it was something we despaired at times of ever seeing happen.
SPORTS
January 22, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Ray (Boom Boom) Mancini just wants to talk about the fight, not about whether his rematch against Livingston Bramble for the World Boxing Assn. lightweight title Feb. 16 at Reno, Nev., will close his career. Yes, Mancini took a battering when he was stopped by Bramble in the 14th round in losing the title last June 1 at Buffalo, N.Y., but he's been physically OK . . . and he's a fighter. After the title loss, some members of the media suggested Mancini retire, although he is only 23 years old.
SPORTS
April 3, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Mancini has had two fights since 1984 and lost them both. Yet tonight, he is matched with Greg Haugen in a pay-per-view boxing show for which he could earn $550,000. The reason has more to do with Mancini's appeal to Reno fight fans than anything at stake. Mancini is big box office here. His three previous Reno fights--and never mind that he won one of the three--grossed live gate totals of $2.2 million.
SPORTS
September 12, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Manny Pacquiao smiled at the question, as many boxers before him have, flexed his right biceps and grinned in delight. "I still feel young and strong," Pacquiao proclaimed last week. Birthday No. 33 comes for Pacquiao on Dec. 17. Floyd Mayweather Jr., the man the boxing world wants Pacquiao to fight if Mayweather withstands the challenge of 24-year-old Victor Ortiz on Saturday in Las Vegas, will turn 35 on Feb. 24. "One lesson we've learned in this sport is that day arrives for fighters when they wake up and find out something they believed was written in stone as unchanging has changed," HBO boxing analyst Larry Merchant said.
SPORTS
April 4, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Greg Haugen knocked Ray Mancini into retirement with a right to the jaw in the seventh round Friday night of a junior-welterweight bout before 5,967 at the Reno/Sparks Convention Center. Haugen, well ahead on points, caught Mancini flush on the left side of his jaw after Mancini had missed Haugen completely with a right. Mancini fell forward, his left arm wrapped around Haugen's head, before landing on the second rope. As he lay there, it appeared that referee Mills Lane would count him out.
SPORTS
April 3, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Mancini has had two fights since 1984 and lost them both. Yet tonight, he is matched with Greg Haugen in a pay-per-view boxing show for which he could earn $550,000. The reason has more to do with Mancini's appeal to Reno fight fans than anything at stake. Mancini is big box office here. His three previous Reno fights--and never mind that he won one of the three--grossed live gate totals of $2.2 million.
SPORTS
February 9, 1992 | RICH TOSCHES
If you get a rush watching violent men with deadly serious intentions, boxing is what you're looking for. It's a sport in which a good practical joke generally consists of whacking an opponent below the belt and watching the look on his face. So what is Greg Haugen doing in this business? To see the former lightweight champion outside of the ring is to see a man locked in a state of perpetual humor.
SPORTS
April 20, 1986 | JOHN PINE, Reuters
Ray Mancini retired last year at the age of 24, having achieved his childhood dream of international fame and wealth--and gradually grew depressed. Mancini, who held the World Boxing Assn. lightweight title for two years and is better known as Boom Boom, had everything he ever wanted but, for the first time in his storybook life, found himself overcome by a "deep funk." "I was in a bad state of depression, and I couldn't understand it because I've always been an up guy.
SPORTS
February 25, 1985 | RICHARD HOFFER
Ray Mancini, the kid who gave the lightweight division a lot of its marquee value, probably left boxing when he left the ring last week. He's made $6 million, achieved his championship dream, and laid a groundwork of fame that should keep him in good stead, if not more income, for years to come. Besides, he could fight Livingstone Bramble, a decidedly limited fighter, 100 times and not beat him. At just 24, Mancini is perceptibly slowed.
SPORTS
April 4, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Greg Haugen knocked Ray Mancini into retirement with a right to the jaw in the seventh round Friday night of a junior-welterweight bout before 5,967 at the Reno/Sparks Convention Center. Haugen, well ahead on points, caught Mancini flush on the left side of his jaw after Mancini had missed Haugen completely with a right. Mancini fell forward, his left arm wrapped around Haugen's head, before landing on the second rope. As he lay there, it appeared that referee Mills Lane would count him out.
SPORTS
April 8, 1985 | BILL SHIRLEY
Computers have helped humans reach the moon, photograph Mars and Jupiter, fight wars, smooth the flow of traffic and cure the sick. Time magazine has even honored a computer as its "Man of the Year." And now, for the first time, one of these remarkable machines has left its mark on the sport of boxing. In February in Reno, a printout of statistics on a prize fight was released to a troubled world. Livingstone Bramble, a computer showed, is the lightweight champion of the World Boxing Assn.
SPORTS
February 25, 1985 | RICHARD HOFFER
Ray Mancini, the kid who gave the lightweight division a lot of its marquee value, probably left boxing when he left the ring last week. He's made $6 million, achieved his championship dream, and laid a groundwork of fame that should keep him in good stead, if not more income, for years to come. Besides, he could fight Livingstone Bramble, a decidedly limited fighter, 100 times and not beat him. At just 24, Mancini is perceptibly slowed.
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