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Ray Mcanally

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
At last year's annual conference of the Labor Party in Britain, some of the delegates were seen to be wearing badges that said "Harry Perkins for Prime Minister." This was a nice tribute to 62-year-old Irish actor Ray McAnally. He plays the Socialist steelworker who becomes prime minister in the near-future post-Thatcher years in the dazzling political thriller "A Very British Coup," which has been shown twice in Britain and which airs on PBS here Sunday and Monday night.
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NEWS
June 17, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Ray McAnally, the classically trained Irish character actor who portrayed a cardinal caught in a vise of conscience in the critically acclaimed 1986 film "The Mission," has died at his home in Ireland, it was learned Friday. Dublin police said he died Thursday night, but gave no cause to either the Reuters news agency or Associated Press. Irish newspapers said the 63-year-old veteran of 250 plays, 50 films and more than 200 television appearances had undergone a heart bypass operation several years ago, and collapsed at his cottage in County Wicklow shortly after voting in Thursday's general election.
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NEWS
June 17, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Ray McAnally, the classically trained Irish character actor who portrayed a cardinal caught in a vise of conscience in the critically acclaimed 1986 film "The Mission," has died at his home in Ireland, it was learned Friday. Dublin police said he died Thursday night, but gave no cause to either the Reuters news agency or Associated Press. Irish newspapers said the 63-year-old veteran of 250 plays, 50 films and more than 200 television appearances had undergone a heart bypass operation several years ago, and collapsed at his cottage in County Wicklow shortly after voting in Thursday's general election.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
At last year's annual conference of the Labor Party in Britain, some of the delegates were seen to be wearing badges that said "Harry Perkins for Prime Minister." This was a nice tribute to 62-year-old Irish actor Ray McAnally. He plays the Socialist steelworker who becomes prime minister in the near-future post-Thatcher years in the dazzling political thriller "A Very British Coup," which has been shown twice in Britain and which airs on PBS here Sunday and Monday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1986 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The memorable last images of "The Mission," the more startling because they suddenly appear after the long closing credits, are of Ray McAnally as Cardinal Altamirano, the Vatican's emissary to the Jesuit missions in South America, staring into the camera. "It's a way of saying, 'It's not just entertainment, is it?' " McAnally remarked during a visit to Los Angeles a few days ago. "An interviewer in England," McAnally added, "asked me what I was actually thinking during that shot.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1988
A three-hour British TV production that will be shown on PBS' "Masterpiece Theatre" in January was named best drama at the 16th annual International Emmy Awards in New York this week. "A Very British Coup," starring Ray McAnally as an ex-steel worker who becomes prime minister of England in the 1990s, was one of three British shows honored Monday night by the International Council of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The British Academy of Film and Television Arts Sunday named "Room With a View" best picture of 1986 and Bob Hoskins best actor for his performance in "Mona Lisa." American film maker Woody Allen picked up two honors--for direction and screenplay of "Hannah and Her Sisters." Maggie Smith won the best actress award for her role as the heroine's prudish chaperone in "Room With a View." Smith is an Oscar nominee for best supporting actress.
NEWS
December 8, 1996 | Kevin Thomas
Daniel Day-Lewis' (pictured with Ruth McCabe) multiple award-winning performance as Irish poet-painter Christy Brown keys this fierce, unsentimental 1989 portrait of an artist whose cerebral palsy spared only his left foot for communication and whose impoverished background left him open to upper-class scorn and condescension; he triumphed over both.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
If you have seen a single billboard for "The Mission" (Plitt Century Plaza), you have some hint of the movie's most audacious and indelible scene. You've also seen the movie's star. As the film opens, a martyred and anonymous Jesuit who has attempted to convert a tribe of 18th-Century South American Indians has been crucified and cast into the waters above the great Iguazu Falls for his efforts. Slowly, with the river's gathering speed, he floats toward the edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1986 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The memorable last images of "The Mission," the more startling because they suddenly appear after the long closing credits, are of Ray McAnally as Cardinal Altamirano, the Vatican's emissary to the Jesuit missions in South America, staring into the camera. "It's a way of saying, 'It's not just entertainment, is it?' " McAnally remarked during a visit to Los Angeles a few days ago. "An interviewer in England," McAnally added, "asked me what I was actually thinking during that shot.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1986 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
The Sicilians say that revenge is a dish best served cold. But for the Irish Protestant and Catholic pensioners who populate "No Surrender" (at the Monica 4-Plex), revenge is a full-course meal. If the hors d'oeuvres don't provoke a brawl, then a bloody battle over dessert will do just fine. What gives this wonderfully barbed British black comedy its acidic edge is the way it takes the rancor of these aging foes and plays it as farce.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1988 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
By rights, "White Mischief" (selected theaters) should have been a barn burner. It's inspired by the infamous goings-on of a clot of British colonials living near Nairobi in the early 1940s, who played at sex, drugs, "rogering" each other's wives and finally murder, while Mother England and the rest of the world went up in flames.
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