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Ray Mendoza

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WORLD
March 24, 2008 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Among the service members who have died since the conflict began in March 2003, the stories of several have lingered in the minds of Times reporters and photographers, even if they weren't necessarily close to them. -- Marine Maj. Ray J. Mendoza was a natural leader -- imposing, muscled and confident, yet humble. He also knew the essence of leadership: that rank is only the beginning. He came to the Marine Corps from Ohio State, where he had been a champion wrestler. Opponents say he never backed down, that he was aggressive from start to finish.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
For most of America, the war in Iraq officially ended last week with a speech-laden ceremony in Baghdad. But for Karen Mendoza and the other 2,000-plus widows of U.S. military personnel killed in Baghdad, Fallouja, Ramadi and dozens of other cities and towns, the war in Iraq will never truly be over. "Being a widow is a full-time job," said Mendoza, whose husband, Marine Maj. Ray Mendoza, 37, was killed in November 2005 when he stepped on a land mine while leading Marines from Camp Pendleton into combat near the Syrian border.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
To those of us who knew and admired him, Ray Mendoza seemed indestructible. He was too big, too strong, too quietly confident and too much of a natural leader to be brought down like other men. But war respects none of those qualities. Mendoza, 37, a major in the Marine Corps from Camp Pendleton, was killed in Iraq three weeks ago while leading his troops into combat. "If you thought anyone could stare down death and beat it, it was Ray," Lt. Col. Robert G.
WORLD
March 24, 2008 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Among the service members who have died since the conflict began in March 2003, the stories of several have lingered in the minds of Times reporters and photographers, even if they weren't necessarily close to them. -- Marine Maj. Ray J. Mendoza was a natural leader -- imposing, muscled and confident, yet humble. He also knew the essence of leadership: that rank is only the beginning. He came to the Marine Corps from Ohio State, where he had been a champion wrestler. Opponents say he never backed down, that he was aggressive from start to finish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
For most of America, the war in Iraq officially ended last week with a speech-laden ceremony in Baghdad. But for Karen Mendoza and the other 2,000-plus widows of U.S. military personnel killed in Baghdad, Fallouja, Ramadi and dozens of other cities and towns, the war in Iraq will never truly be over. "Being a widow is a full-time job," said Mendoza, whose husband, Marine Maj. Ray Mendoza, 37, was killed in November 2005 when he stepped on a land mine while leading Marines from Camp Pendleton into combat near the Syrian border.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1986
Why does everyone, including Bill Lockyer, insist that the proposed Los Angeles prison site is in the heart of California's Latino community? True, the Crown Coach Bus Co. site is on the east side of downtown Los Angeles, but it is also on the west side of the Los Angeles River. This propsed site and its immediate area have been deteriorating for the last 30 years and many a politician, man or woman, have done nothing to upgrade the area. But suddenly, by bringing protesters, who don't live in this area, these politicians and their followers are considered to be defending "their neighborhood."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1993
If there was any doubt that some of the streets of Los Angeles are getting even meaner, even more shockingly violent and unpredictable, it has to be dispelled by the gang ambush of two anti-gang police officers on Tuesday. A lack of respect for the law has always been a problem in America. The difference now, of course, is that lack of respect is backed by firepower as never before. There have always been gangs--but never have so many of them been so heavily armed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
A convicted murderer in court for arraignment on six felony charges was shot and killed Thursday when he tried to take a bailiff's gun. One officer was wounded in the scuffle. Daniel Ray Mendoza, 37, of Salinas tried to snatch the bailiff's gun, said Grace Mitchell, who was in the courtroom at the time. Her boyfriend, Fred Murphy, who was appearing for extradition proceedings, was handcuffed to Mendoza. Murphy was not harmed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1993 | RICH CONNELL and NIESON HIMMEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A suspect wanted in one of last month's ambush attacks on Los Angeles Police Department anti-gang officers was killed by officers Friday night in a dramatic shootout in Hawthorne. The dead man was identified by police as 20-year-old Terrance Thomas, who had been the focus of an intense manhunt stretching from Los Angeles to Denver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
To those of us who knew and admired him, Ray Mendoza seemed indestructible. He was too big, too strong, too quietly confident and too much of a natural leader to be brought down like other men. But war respects none of those qualities. Mendoza, 37, a major in the Marine Corps from Camp Pendleton, was killed in Iraq three weeks ago while leading his troops into combat. "If you thought anyone could stare down death and beat it, it was Ray," Lt. Col. Robert G.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1999 | LEE ROMNEY and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A new lender is in town eager to finance small businesses that can't get in the door of conventional banks. The Oakland-based California Economic Development Lending Initiative opened its Los Angeles office on South Figueroa Street to increase its lending here, President George Williamson said. The statewide organization teams with banks and community lending groups to finance small businesses, many of them women- and minority-owned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2006 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The last time he spoke to his wife from Iraq, Maj. Ray Mendoza urged her to visit the injured Marines from his company at the base hospital and be sure to call their wives. "He prayed every night to bring his boys home safe," Karen Mendoza said. "And that's what happened. I thank God for that." Four days later, on Nov. 14, 2005, her husband was killed as he prepared to lead his men into battle along the Syrian border. He was the only fatality among the Marines of Echo Company.
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