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Ray Meyers

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SPORTS
November 23, 1986 | RANDY MINKOFF, United Press International
Something about Chicago brings out the worst in our language. What else could explain the constant mispronunciations, misspellings and general abuse of the people, places and things associated with Chicago athletics? --Soldier Field. How many times have network commentators called it Soldiers Field? How many Chicagoans add the "s"? The plaque in front of the home of the Chicago Bears has no extra "s." --Ray Meyer. Again the "s" syndrome.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2006 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Ray Meyer, who molded an inexperienced big man named George Mikan into a great basketball player in the early 1940s and tamed the exuberant showiness of Mark Aguirre long enough to lead the DePaul Blue Demons to the Final Four in 1979, died Friday in Chicago. He was 92. Meyer, who compiled a record of 724-354 over 42 years of coaching at DePaul, a small Catholic university on the north side of Chicago, had often used a wheelchair in the last few years as his hip bone deteriorated.
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SPORTS
January 19, 1992 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The father worries about the son. He always has. He worries about the dark circles under his boy's eyes. Worries about the sleeping pills. The lost weight. The Di-Gel lunches. The 15-hour days. The silence. He worries because he knows. Forty years ago at Chicago Stadium, Ray Meyer was the DePaul coach. His son, Joey, was 2.
SPORTS
January 19, 1992 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The father worries about the son. He always has. He worries about the dark circles under his boy's eyes. Worries about the sleeping pills. The lost weight. The Di-Gel lunches. The 15-hour days. The silence. He worries because he knows. Forty years ago at Chicago Stadium, Ray Meyer was the DePaul coach. His son, Joey, was 2.
SPORTS
September 19, 1986 | United Press International
Ray Meyer, retired DePaul basketball coach, said Thursday he would consider coaching again. In an interview with radio station WMAQ, Meyer, 72, said he would listen to offers, preferably from a medium-sized school. "I think I would," he said. "I haven't thought about it too much, but I would think about it anyway." Meyer, a member of the Hall of Fame, won 724 games in 42 years of coaching and is fifth on the victory list for college coaches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2006 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Ray Meyer, who molded an inexperienced big man named George Mikan into a great basketball player in the early 1940s and tamed the exuberant showiness of Mark Aguirre long enough to lead the DePaul Blue Demons to the Final Four in 1979, died Friday in Chicago. He was 92. Meyer, who compiled a record of 724-354 over 42 years of coaching at DePaul, a small Catholic university on the north side of Chicago, had often used a wheelchair in the last few years as his hip bone deteriorated.
SPORTS
March 10, 1985 | HELENE ELLIOTT, Newsday
His office is dark and warm, a welcome refuge from the slushy snow that mounts in ugly gray piles on the narrow streets of the Near North side. But there is no escape for Joey Meyer, no effective way to relieve the tension that drives him to rearrange a line of perfectly aligned pens as he leans on a table, no release for the pressure that burdens him more heavily than he ever imagined.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | DAN STANTON
The continued rise in water temperature has helped bring bonito and barracuda to the surface in the past week. The fish have been caught off Palos Verdes, Rocky Point and Catalina Island. Anglers have been able to catch their limits on most trips. After all but disappearing last year, bonito are returning to all kelp areas with some of the legal-sized boneheads reaching eight pounds.
SPORTS
April 16, 1992
The continued rise in water temperature has helped bring bonito and barracuda to the surface in the past week. The fish have been caught off Palos Verdes, Rocky Point and Catalina Island. Anglers have been able to catch their limits on most trips. After all but disappearing last year, bonito are returning to all kelp areas with some of the legal-sized boneheads reaching eight pounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1986 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
It is that time of year again, when locals in flannel and work boots cede downtown to the sweaters-and-Reeboks set each weekend. A time when the purveyors of the hottest commodity since gold ran out in 1906 get ready for an onslaught. A time when it's easier to park and walk a mile into town than to face the traffic.
SPORTS
November 23, 1986 | RANDY MINKOFF, United Press International
Something about Chicago brings out the worst in our language. What else could explain the constant mispronunciations, misspellings and general abuse of the people, places and things associated with Chicago athletics? --Soldier Field. How many times have network commentators called it Soldiers Field? How many Chicagoans add the "s"? The plaque in front of the home of the Chicago Bears has no extra "s." --Ray Meyer. Again the "s" syndrome.
SPORTS
September 19, 1986 | United Press International
Ray Meyer, retired DePaul basketball coach, said Thursday he would consider coaching again. In an interview with radio station WMAQ, Meyer, 72, said he would listen to offers, preferably from a medium-sized school. "I think I would," he said. "I haven't thought about it too much, but I would think about it anyway." Meyer, a member of the Hall of Fame, won 724 games in 42 years of coaching and is fifth on the victory list for college coaches.
SPORTS
March 10, 1985 | HELENE ELLIOTT, Newsday
His office is dark and warm, a welcome refuge from the slushy snow that mounts in ugly gray piles on the narrow streets of the Near North side. But there is no escape for Joey Meyer, no effective way to relieve the tension that drives him to rearrange a line of perfectly aligned pens as he leans on a table, no release for the pressure that burdens him more heavily than he ever imagined.
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | DAVID LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
Convenience stores, convenience foods and now--it figures--convenience pets. That would seem to be the trend both in California and the nation. What with the obligation for them to be taken for walks, plus restrictive leash laws, to say nothing of the waste problem, dog ownership is becoming a thankless task. And with the high costs of upkeep and the lack of space to keep and ride them, horses are also fading in the stretch. Coming on strong are cats, birds, reptiles and fish.
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