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Ray Nagin

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May 18, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
For the last month, two of Louisiana's best-known political figures have battled each other for the right to lead this hurricane-devastated city back to prosperity. But as the incumbent mayor, C. Ray Nagin, and the lieutenant governor, Mitch Landrieu, have debated the future of New Orleans, it has become clear that the choice facing voters at the polls this weekend is not between competing strategies for revitalizing the city -- but rather between sharply different styles of leadership.
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NATIONAL
January 18, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Former New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin, who was the combative and determined face of his city crushed beneath the floodwaters spawned by Hurricane Katrina, has been indicted on bribery and related charges, officials announced on Friday. The charges stem from an ongoing corruption investigation of Nagin's two terms in office beginning in 2002. Two former city officials and two businessmen have already pleaded guilty in connection with the scandal. The businessmen, Frank Fradella and Rodney Williams, both pleaded guilty to bribing the mayor and are expected to testify against Nagin.
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NATIONAL
May 21, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Savoring the vote of confidence Saturday that gave him a second term, Mayor C. Ray Nagin called for unity in the storm-ravaged city, saying it's "time for this community to start the healing process.... It's time for us to set the stage for recovery." Nagin won 52% of the 113,591 ballots cast in the runoff contest with Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu. Nearly 38% of registered voters turned out. His victory solidifies his leadership role in one of the toughest reconstruction projects in U.S. history.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
Is "Chocolate City," as this town was famously called, on the verge of electing a vanilla mayor? That is the political question gripping New Orleans, where white candidate Mitch Landrieu, Louisiana's lieutenant governor, has emerged as a mayoral front-runner in a city where a black population diminished by Hurricane Katrina still holds a majority -- but where fear of the loss of black political power remains palpable. Landrieu, a 49-year-old Democrat, was defeated in the 2006 mayor's race by incumbent C. Ray Nagin, who is leaving office this year because of term limits.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2006 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
Mayor C. Ray Nagin was mugging for the television cameras Thursday at a local landmark, Loretta's Authentic Pralines, when a journalist jokingly asked him to sample one of the confectioner's chocolate varieties. "No. I'm staying away from that," Nagin said, smiling and walking quickly past the pralines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2006 | Louis Sahagun and Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writers
To err is human. But is punishment divine? And if God is unleashing his wrath, how do you know? These eternal questions arose last week when New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin said the hurricanes that devastated his city showed that "God is mad at America" and black communities. A few weeks earlier, TV evangelist Pat Robertson suggested that Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's stroke was payback for pulling out of the Gaza Strip.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Former New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin, who was the combative and determined face of his city crushed beneath the floodwaters spawned by Hurricane Katrina, has been indicted on bribery and related charges, officials announced on Friday. The charges stem from an ongoing corruption investigation of Nagin's two terms in office beginning in 2002. Two former city officials and two businessmen have already pleaded guilty in connection with the scandal. The businessmen, Frank Fradella and Rodney Williams, both pleaded guilty to bribing the mayor and are expected to testify against Nagin.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2007 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Mayor C. Ray Nagin is way beyond caring whether President Bush mentioned New Orleans in his State of the Union address Tuesday night. "We're 18 months into this thing. I'm tired of complaining and bellyaching," Nagin said Wednesday when asked about the speech at a news conference. The city continues its struggle to recover from Hurricane Katrina, which pummeled New Orleans in August 2005, and some observers thought the absence of Katrina recovery from Bush's speech was telling.
NATIONAL
September 29, 2002 | MEGAN K. STACK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are calling from all over town to lay their laurels at the mayor's feet. "I'm behind you 100%," gushes the first caller. "Thank you for stepping up to the plate," the next one says reverently. Mayor C. Ray Nagin nods, bald pate gleaming under the studio lights of WWL 870 AM. "Thank you," they say, one after the next. Ever since Nagin swept from obscurity to celebrity in last winter's elections, he has been the toast of his hometown.
NATIONAL
April 13, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
The frustration, disillusionment and anger of life after Hurricane Katrina have compelled 22 people to declare that they can do a better job of running the city than Mayor C. Ray Nagin. The largest field of challengers in a modern New Orleans mayoral race includes marquee names such as Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu and familiar names and faces such as radio host James Arey, city Clerk of Court Kimberly Williamson Butler and a comedian who ran in 2002 on the slogan "A Troubled Man for Troubled Times."
NATIONAL
January 25, 2007 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Mayor C. Ray Nagin is way beyond caring whether President Bush mentioned New Orleans in his State of the Union address Tuesday night. "We're 18 months into this thing. I'm tired of complaining and bellyaching," Nagin said Wednesday when asked about the speech at a news conference. The city continues its struggle to recover from Hurricane Katrina, which pummeled New Orleans in August 2005, and some observers thought the absence of Katrina recovery from Bush's speech was telling.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Savoring the vote of confidence Saturday that gave him a second term, Mayor C. Ray Nagin called for unity in the storm-ravaged city, saying it's "time for this community to start the healing process.... It's time for us to set the stage for recovery." Nagin won 52% of the 113,591 ballots cast in the runoff contest with Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu. Nearly 38% of registered voters turned out. His victory solidifies his leadership role in one of the toughest reconstruction projects in U.S. history.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
For the last month, two of Louisiana's best-known political figures have battled each other for the right to lead this hurricane-devastated city back to prosperity. But as the incumbent mayor, C. Ray Nagin, and the lieutenant governor, Mitch Landrieu, have debated the future of New Orleans, it has become clear that the choice facing voters at the polls this weekend is not between competing strategies for revitalizing the city -- but rather between sharply different styles of leadership.
NATIONAL
April 13, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
The frustration, disillusionment and anger of life after Hurricane Katrina have compelled 22 people to declare that they can do a better job of running the city than Mayor C. Ray Nagin. The largest field of challengers in a modern New Orleans mayoral race includes marquee names such as Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu and familiar names and faces such as radio host James Arey, city Clerk of Court Kimberly Williamson Butler and a comedian who ran in 2002 on the slogan "A Troubled Man for Troubled Times."
NATIONAL
March 12, 2006 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Perhaps it did not bode well for C. Ray Nagin, the mayor of this fraught city, that candidates for the upcoming mayoral election were asked to turn in their filing papers at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. After all, the same facility had become a fetid, lawless and ill-equipped shelter after Hurricane Katrina -- and a fiasco Nagin's critics have pointed to in questioning his response to the storm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2006 | Louis Sahagun and Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writers
To err is human. But is punishment divine? And if God is unleashing his wrath, how do you know? These eternal questions arose last week when New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin said the hurricanes that devastated his city showed that "God is mad at America" and black communities. A few weeks earlier, TV evangelist Pat Robertson suggested that Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's stroke was payback for pulling out of the Gaza Strip.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2006 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Perhaps it did not bode well for C. Ray Nagin, the mayor of this fraught city, that candidates for the upcoming mayoral election were asked to turn in their filing papers at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. After all, the same facility had become a fetid, lawless and ill-equipped shelter after Hurricane Katrina -- and a fiasco Nagin's critics have pointed to in questioning his response to the storm.
NATIONAL
November 28, 2005 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
Months of frustration and uncertainty turned to angry shouts and tears Sunday as a church filled with Hurricane Katrina evacuees confronted New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin at an often-raucous town hall meeting here. It was one of several meetings Nagin is holding outside of Louisiana as a way to assure displaced residents that the city will survive and prosper.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2006 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
Mayor C. Ray Nagin was mugging for the television cameras Thursday at a local landmark, Loretta's Authentic Pralines, when a journalist jokingly asked him to sample one of the confectioner's chocolate varieties. "No. I'm staying away from that," Nagin said, smiling and walking quickly past the pralines.
NATIONAL
November 28, 2005 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
Months of frustration and uncertainty turned to angry shouts and tears Sunday as a church filled with Hurricane Katrina evacuees confronted New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin at an often-raucous town hall meeting here. It was one of several meetings Nagin is holding outside of Louisiana as a way to assure displaced residents that the city will survive and prosper.
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