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Ray Newman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Court-appointed attorneys may have overbilled Los Angeles County by as much as $1.5 million during the last two years, according to a county audit. Among the examples of possible abuses was the case of top-paid lawyer Ray Newman, who billed the county for working on cases every day last year, including weekends and holidays, Tyler McCauley, chief of the auditor-controller's audit division, said Wednesday. Newman earned more than $1 million in 1988 and 1989 by handling county cases.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1991 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the look of his bills, Raymond Newman was the biggest workaholic in town. Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, the Fourth of July--barely a minute seemed to go by that the court-appointed criminal defense attorney was not punching the county clock on behalf of his indigent clients. But after paying him more than $1.3 million during the last three years, the county cracked down on the veteran Pasadena lawyer.
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SPORTS
December 17, 1989
A Los Angeles attorney has filed lawsuits against five NFL rookies in an effort to recover about $115,000 he contends he loaned the players while they were in college. The suits are filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court by attorney Ray Newman, and name among the players Atlanta Falcon defensive back Deion Sanders. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported the lawsuits today in a copyrighted story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Court-appointed attorneys may have overbilled Los Angeles County by as much as $1.5 million during the last two years, according to a county audit. Among the examples of possible abuses was the case of top-paid lawyer Ray Newman, who billed the county for working on cases every day last year, including weekends and holidays, Tyler McCauley, chief of the auditor-controller's audit division, said Wednesday. Newman earned more than $1 million in 1988 and 1989 by handling county cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1989 | CAROL McGRAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles attorney, whom the district attorney's office sued more than two years ago to reclaim thousands of dollars in alleged overbilling for work with indigent clients, may have continued the practice after the civil suit was filed, officials said Wednesday. Attorney Ray Newman was paid $508,000 by the Los Angeles Superior Court and allegedly billed for work performed on 366 days of the year, court officials told a press conference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1991 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the look of his bills, Raymond Newman was the biggest workaholic in town. Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, the Fourth of July--barely a minute seemed to go by that the court-appointed criminal defense attorney was not punching the county clock on behalf of his indigent clients. But after paying him more than $1.3 million during the last three years, the county cracked down on the veteran Pasadena lawyer.
OPINION
September 18, 2007
Re "Reconciliation needed -- in D.C.," Opinion, Sept. 12 Ronald Brownstein's article asking how can we expect political reconciliation between the Sunnis and the Shiites in Iraq if we don't have it between Democrats and Republicans in Washington overlooks a key point: Reconciliation does not mean agreeing with each other, it means talking with each other toward a common goal. We have peaceful, albeit sometimes acrimonious, talking in our capital; we have violence and wanton murder in Iraq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1996
Attorney Ray Newman was found not guilty Tuesday on charges that he overbilled Los Angeles County by as much as $1 million on his court-appointed defense cases. A Los Angeles County Superior Court jury took just 50 minutes to acquit Newman of grand theft--his second trial stemming from work on a series of death penalty cases during the late 1980s. In the first trial in 1993, a jury found Newman not guilty of one count each of grand theft and perjury but deadlocked on three other counts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1993
A jury has acquitted a court-appointed lawyer, who was accused of overbilling the county on death penalty cases, on two criminal counts and deadlocked on three. The jury found Ray Newman, 49, not guilty of one count each of grand theft and perjury. But after deliberating another day, the panel told Superior Court Judge Charles Horan on Thursday that it could not reach agreement on three similar counts. Newman is scheduled to be back in court Nov.
NEWS
July 20, 1985 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles man labeled as emotionally disturbed by his lawyers was convicted by a Superior Court jury Friday of second-degree murder in the March, 1983, shooting of Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Lawrence Lavieri. Lionel Henry, 35, shot Lavieri after the officer and fellow Deputy Douglas Smith responded to a call about a suspicious person at a Carson service station.
SPORTS
December 17, 1989
A Los Angeles attorney has filed lawsuits against five NFL rookies in an effort to recover about $115,000 he contends he loaned the players while they were in college. The suits are filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court by attorney Ray Newman, and name among the players Atlanta Falcon defensive back Deion Sanders. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported the lawsuits today in a copyrighted story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1989 | CAROL McGRAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles attorney, whom the district attorney's office sued more than two years ago to reclaim thousands of dollars in alleged overbilling for work with indigent clients, may have continued the practice after the civil suit was filed, officials said Wednesday. Attorney Ray Newman was paid $508,000 by the Los Angeles Superior Court and allegedly billed for work performed on 366 days of the year, court officials told a press conference.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2003 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
Paparazzi aplenty thronged the sidewalks outside the Coast Playhouse on Wednesday night. The occasion? The star-studded world premiere of Roger Kumble's "Turnaround," featuring David Schwimmer, best known as the diffident Ross Geller on the long-running television series "Friends." Such hoopla surrounding a sub-99-seat theater venue is rare. However, does the play inside stand the glare of public scrutiny as well as the tanned, toned celebrities who turned out on opening night?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2007 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Characters in movies have been confusing sex with love or trying to use one to rectify the other since the very beginning. In general, they come to the earth-shattering conclusion that they are not the same and, though linked, the alchemy between the two cannot easily be altered. For the audience's sake, this process goes down best when no one takes it too seriously. Miles Brandman's earnest "Sex and Breakfast" features two L.A.
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