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April 29, 1988 | JIM CARRIER, Carrier is a reporter for the Denver Post. and
It was a miserable day to be pregnant. Hot, humid, late in July, 1987. Afternoon thunderheads teased the mountains to the east of the city, and even skinny people sweated. Had it not been for motherhood, Darci Pierce and Cindy Ray might never have met on a broiling blacktop parking lot outside an obstetrics clinic. On this day, particularly, it was no place for a mother to be.
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NEWS
April 29, 1988 | JIM CARRIER, Carrier is a reporter for the Denver Post. and
It was a miserable day to be pregnant. Hot, humid, late in July, 1987. Afternoon thunderheads teased the mountains to the east of the city, and even skinny people sweated. Had it not been for motherhood, Darci Pierce and Cindy Ray might never have met on a broiling blacktop parking lot outside an obstetrics clinic. On this day, particularly, it was no place for a mother to be.
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NEWS
April 8, 1987 | Associated Press
A California Highway Patrol officer was killed when he lost control of his car while chasing a suspected drunk driver, who also was injured along with his two children, authorities said Tuesday. Rescuers had to cut Officer Michael Brandt out of his demolished Mustang patrol car, which rolled over on a winding stretch of California 74, but he died after being airlifted to Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage, CHP Officer Tom Granger said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2009 | By Tony Barboza
An aerialist performing during a holiday show at the Beverly Center mall was injured and hospitalized after falling to the shopping center floor, authorities said Sunday. One witness said the performer appeared to fall about 40 feet -- from the third level of the shopping center to the first. The 26-year-old woman slipped while hanging upside down from a solid metal hoop suspended from the ceiling during the finale of the show "Hunky Santa and the Candy Cane Girls" Saturday evening, said Ray Pierce, owner of Hollywood Aerial Arts, the firm putting on the performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1996 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Credis quod habes et habes, "What you believe is real is real." That's the motto at Caesars Magical Empire, a $35-million magic venue and scripted dining experience that officially opened last week here at Caesars Palace. Never mind that after the motto has been repeated a few times, it starts to sound a little like Que sera sera, "What will be will be." If seeing is believing, the 66,000-square-foot Magical Empire figures to be churning out believers at the rate of 2,400 per day.
NEWS
February 27, 2003 | Jenny Hontz, Special to The Times
Hands coated in chalk, belt strapped around my waist, I took a deep breath, approached the blue metal ladder and started to climb. The 10-foot platform looked much higher from the top. As two guys hooked safety wires onto my belt, I stepped to the edge, heart racing, and clutched the trapeze. And then I jumped. As I swung through the air on the flying trapeze, a grin of terrified delight on my face, a rush of adrenaline surged through my body.
HEALTH
June 20, 2005 | John Rosenthal, Special to The Times
Whether you're hoping to add some zest to your workout or just looking for a fling, there's never been a better time to try the flying trapeze. With more than 50 trapeze schools and camps around the country, just about anybody can be a swinger. There is no national governing body keeping statistics about trapeze use, but people who run trapeze schools say that the sport is enjoying unprecedented interest. Tim Holst, vice president of talent and production for Ringling Bros.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back when Rose Parade floats were little more than trucks blanketed with chicken wire and flowers, most parade-day breakdowns could be handled with a wrench or some starter cables. But the flower facades of the modern floats usually conceal a spaghetti tangle of hydraulic lines and electronic circuitry. When one of today's 50,000-pound animated behemoths malfunctions, it can take 15 hours of trouble-shooting just to find the busted widget that caused the problem.
SPORTS
February 19, 2011 | By David Wharton
In a concrete tunnel beneath the stands at Staples Center, two workers fussed over a silver sports car, cleaning and waxing, getting it ready to be wheeled onto the arena's floor. The NBA dunk contest was still an hour or so away, but a rumor had made the rounds: Someone was going to park that car in front of the basket and jump over it, sailing all the way to the rim. "We heard that," one of the workers said. "It's going to be Blake Griffin, right?" With a choir singing "I Believe I Can Fly" at midcourt, the Clippers rookie comfortably cleared the car's hood and took an alley-oop pass from teammate Baron Davis popping out of the sunroof.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2003 | Barbara Isenberg, Special to The Times
One night next May, Seattle's most famous radio psychiatrist, Dr. Frasier Crane, will undergo the most profound form of separation anxiety: exile from the network prime time that has pretty much been his home for two decades. As a new television season is starting and close to 40 new network series are set to bow, "Frasier" will conclude one of the longest-running, most successful tenures in television history.
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