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Ray Price

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | Randy Lewis
When a fan told Ray Price that he sounded like Hank Williams, the young country singer should have been thrilled. It was 1953, not long after Williams' death, and Price had taken over fronting the revered musician's band. But Price did not take the comment as a compliment. "A red light went off," he recalled years later. "Going home that night, I told the boys, 'I love the lot of you, but you sound like Hank.'" Not satisfied to be merely a standard-bearer of honky tonk, he began to experiment by tinkering with rhythm and later even adding lush strings, reshaping country music with a vibrant new energy that continued long after the 1950s and '60s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Merle Haggard
Ray Price was the mentor and the leader. He was discovered and brought to Columbia Records by Lefty Frizzell, and he made his first record on Columbia with Lefty's band. That was a song called "If You're Ever Lonely Darling. " After that, after he made his debut on Columbia, he gave many other people a chance to do the same thing. He brought Roger Miller to the surface, and he gave Willie Nelson a job in his band. In 1966, I was on tour with Ray down in the states of Texas and Oklahoma, and that was the first time I met Ray. Of course, I was a fan for many years before that.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Country singer Ray Price, whose propulsive 1956 hit “Crazy Arms” helped revolutionize the sound of country music in the 1950s, died Monday at his home in Mount Pleasant, Texas, following a battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 87. His death was announced by family spokesman Bill Mack, a country music disc jockey. Price charted more than 100 hits during a span of nearly 40 years as a regular presence on the country charts from 1952 to 1989, from “Crazy Arms” and “Heartaches by the Number” during his first round of fame in the '50s through deeply felt ballads such as his 1970 Grammy-winning recording of Kris Kristofferson's “For the Good Times.” PHOTOS: Celebs react to the death of Ray Price Price cited country giant Hank Williams as one of his few mentors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | Randy Lewis
When a fan told Ray Price that he sounded like Hank Williams, the young country singer should have been thrilled. It was 1953, not long after Williams' death, and Price had taken over fronting the revered musician's band. But Price did not take the comment as a compliment. "A red light went off," he recalled years later. "Going home that night, I told the boys, 'I love the lot of you, but you sound like Hank.'" Not satisfied to be merely a standard-bearer of honky tonk, he began to experiment by tinkering with rhythm and later even adding lush strings, reshaping country music with a vibrant new energy that continued long after the 1950s and '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Merle Haggard
Ray Price was the mentor and the leader. He was discovered and brought to Columbia Records by Lefty Frizzell, and he made his first record on Columbia with Lefty's band. That was a song called "If You're Ever Lonely Darling. " After that, after he made his debut on Columbia, he gave many other people a chance to do the same thing. He brought Roger Miller to the surface, and he gave Willie Nelson a job in his band. In 1966, I was on tour with Ray down in the states of Texas and Oklahoma, and that was the first time I met Ray. Of course, I was a fan for many years before that.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1993 | Buddy Seigal
Hank Williams: "I lived with Hank for about a year before he died. Hank was the one who got me on the Grand Ole Opry. He was a good ole boy, just confused and trying to cope with some things he couldn't cope with. And he wasn't on drugs; alcohol killed him, he was an alcoholic. He was a real unhappy person, raised up on the wrong side of town and mistreated by everybody." Lefty Frizzell: "Lefty and I got started together in Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1988 | Mike Boehm
With the classic honky-tonk sound blowing over the contemporary country music landscape like a revivifying breeze, you would think that Ray Price would catch a waft of that bracing air, see a wide-open window of opportunity and try to climb on through. Price, after all, had a lot to do with establishing honky-tonk as a classic style in the first place. A protege of Hank Williams, he was an early master of honky-tonk.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1993 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Ray Price has had quite a run--more than 100 country hits over four decades, an innovative role in the evolution of honky-tonk music, and an unpredictable pattern that saw him go from orchestrated pop ballads such as "Danny Boy" to a hit version of the young Kris Kristofferson's "For the Good Times." Price's reading of that challenging lyric was the most absorbing moment in his show at the Crazy Horse on Monday, where the 67-year-old Texan conducted an easygoing overview of his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not difficult to scare up a vintage Charles Mingus or John Coltrane cut on jazz radio. Recent blues albums by John Lee Hooker and Buddy Guy have been the bestsellers of the veterans' careers. The Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton and Rod Stewart, to name just a very few rock 'n' roll old-timers, are still arena-packing attractions. Why is it that country music has no respect for its elders?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1992 | NOEL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ray Price, one of the most successful country singers of all time, thinks the music industry has changed dramatically--and not necessarily for the better--since he was regularly topping the charts, A member of the country class of the '50s that also produced such legends as Lefty Frizzell, George Jones, Johnny Cash and others, Price believes that the days of such superstars-for-life are in the past--Garth Brooks notwithstanding.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Country singer Ray Price, whose propulsive 1956 hit “Crazy Arms” helped revolutionize the sound of country music in the 1950s, died Monday at his home in Mount Pleasant, Texas, following a battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 87. His death was announced by family spokesman Bill Mack, a country music disc jockey. Price charted more than 100 hits during a span of nearly 40 years as a regular presence on the country charts from 1952 to 1989, from “Crazy Arms” and “Heartaches by the Number” during his first round of fame in the '50s through deeply felt ballads such as his 1970 Grammy-winning recording of Kris Kristofferson's “For the Good Times.” PHOTOS: Celebs react to the death of Ray Price Price cited country giant Hank Williams as one of his few mentors.
SPORTS
April 24, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — There was no marine layer in Tropicana Field on Tuesday night, no heavy air to turn would-be home runs into warning-track fly balls. Left-hander David Price didn't need it; he threw his second career shutout, a 119-pitch, five-hit gem with six strikeouts to lead the Tampa Bay Rays to a 5-0 victory over the Angels. Right-hander Ervin Santana could have used it, though a thick fog and gale-force winds blowing in from right field may not have kept two Rays bombs in the park.
FOOD
July 22, 2010
Inn of the Seventh Ray Rating: two stars Location: Inn of the Seventh Ray, 128 Old Topanga Canyon Road, Topanga; (310) 455-1311; http://www.innoftheseventhray.com . Price: Dinner starters, $9 to $17; main courses, $21 to $41; sides, $7; cheese plate, $17; desserts, $9 to $10. Corkage fee, $20. Details: Open for lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday to Friday and 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Sunday brunch is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dinner is 5:30 to 10 p.m. daily.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2008 | David Colker
This year Blu-ray won the bitterly fought high-definition disc war when rival HD-DVD gave up. To celebrate the victory, which left it with no real rivals in the high-def realm, Blu-ray did what most monopolies do: raise prices. "In the middle of the format wars, you had Sony and Samsung Blu-ray players on special for $299," said Paul Erickson, an analyst at DisplaySearch. "After the war was over, it went to $399." But no more.
SPORTS
May 6, 1998 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Katrina Price, who caught Coach Maura McHugh's eye at a college all-star game during the women's Final Four in March, was the Long Beach StingRays' top pick and the seventh overall in Tuesday's ABL draft. The 5-foot-10, 150-pound guard from Stephen F. Austin brings three-point shooting and tough perimeter defense to Long Beach, McHugh said. "She has a pro-style body . . . strong, yet she's quick and agile," McHugh said. "She drives well and I like her passing skills.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1993 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Ray Price has had quite a run--more than 100 country hits over four decades, an innovative role in the evolution of honky-tonk music, and an unpredictable pattern that saw him go from orchestrated pop ballads such as "Danny Boy" to a hit version of the young Kris Kristofferson's "For the Good Times." Price's reading of that challenging lyric was the most absorbing moment in his show at the Crazy Horse on Monday, where the 67-year-old Texan conducted an easygoing overview of his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1989 | LAURA PALMER
Imagine trying to practice and play basketball without the hoop, hockey without the ice. Or playing in a game but not having the points you score count. A handful of athletes in city league high schools must, because of the lack of facilities, scrounge for places to practice and compete. No city league schools have swimming pools, forcing swim teams to practice at local colleges or recreation centers. The situation is worse for divers, because there are no boards at the rec center pools.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2008 | David Colker
This year Blu-ray won the bitterly fought high-definition disc war when rival HD-DVD gave up. To celebrate the victory, which left it with no real rivals in the high-def realm, Blu-ray did what most monopolies do: raise prices. "In the middle of the format wars, you had Sony and Samsung Blu-ray players on special for $299," said Paul Erickson, an analyst at DisplaySearch. "After the war was over, it went to $399." But no more.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1993 | Buddy Seigal
Hank Williams: "I lived with Hank for about a year before he died. Hank was the one who got me on the Grand Ole Opry. He was a good ole boy, just confused and trying to cope with some things he couldn't cope with. And he wasn't on drugs; alcohol killed him, he was an alcoholic. He was a real unhappy person, raised up on the wrong side of town and mistreated by everybody." Lefty Frizzell: "Lefty and I got started together in Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not difficult to scare up a vintage Charles Mingus or John Coltrane cut on jazz radio. Recent blues albums by John Lee Hooker and Buddy Guy have been the bestsellers of the veterans' careers. The Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton and Rod Stewart, to name just a very few rock 'n' roll old-timers, are still arena-packing attractions. Why is it that country music has no respect for its elders?
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