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Ray Rising

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August 29, 1996 | DENISE MARIE SIINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After two years of being held hostage deep in the Colombian rain forest by armed rebels, of being moved constantly, of his hair turning from brown to gray, American missionary Ray Rising is unharmed and free. There was no ransom paid, though his captors had every intention of collecting one when they grabbed him. Ultimately, they became convinced that their best move was simply to set Rising free.
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NEWS
August 29, 1996 | DENISE MARIE SIINO
March 31, 1994 After distributing food to poor families in Puerto Lleras, Colombia, missionary Ray Rising was indulging the children in one of their favorite activities: a ride on the back of his motorcycle. As the sun was setting, Rising offered the last ride on his Suzuki DR-250 to a little girl, then headed for the compound where he, his wife and children and other missionary families lived. "As I neared the back gate, I noticed a man walking ahead of me," Rising recalls.
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NEWS
August 29, 1996 | DENISE MARIE SIINO
March 31, 1994 After distributing food to poor families in Puerto Lleras, Colombia, missionary Ray Rising was indulging the children in one of their favorite activities: a ride on the back of his motorcycle. As the sun was setting, Rising offered the last ride on his Suzuki DR-250 to a little girl, then headed for the compound where he, his wife and children and other missionary families lived. "As I neared the back gate, I noticed a man walking ahead of me," Rising recalls.
NEWS
August 29, 1996 | DENISE MARIE SIINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After two years of being held hostage deep in the Colombian rain forest by armed rebels, of being moved constantly, of his hair turning from brown to gray, American missionary Ray Rising is unharmed and free. There was no ransom paid, though his captors had every intention of collecting one when they grabbed him. Ultimately, they became convinced that their best move was simply to set Rising free.
SPORTS
November 8, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
For the umpteenth time in his remarkable career, 32-year-old Sugar Ray Leonard reached down deep and summoned what he needed to fuel his nuclear-powered heart. And he emerged triumphant again in a desperate, exciting battle with a brave Canadian light-heavyweight, Donny Lalonde.
NEWS
December 20, 1985 | DON SNOWDEN, Snowden lives in Venice
"Let me tell you a story," Cecil Ferguson said, settling back on the living room couch in his Fairfax District home. "The library was doing an exhibit at the new Arco Towers about the founding of Los Angeles up to World War II but the only representation was Europeans. "The black and Latino communities jumped on the library and Arco since the founding fathers of Los Angeles were black and Latino. The library asked me to put together a visual exhibition on blacks in Los Angeles.
NEWS
June 6, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last trace of Ray Rising, a missionary from Minnesota, was his motorcycle. On March 31, 1994, it was found abandoned on a lonely road near a Colombian village that the electronics technician was helping with food and financial aid. Mark Bossard went missing at a roadblock not far from the rural Colombian mine he was visiting three months ago. The American businessman, originally from Anaconda, Mont., was last seen being escorted away by five men in military clothing.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A vision of translating the Bible took hold of salesman William Cameron Townsend of Santa Ana in 1917. He had just arrived in Guatemala, and the Mayan groups he had hoped to reach had little use for his wares: Spanish-language Bibles. His epiphany is said to have come with a question posed by a potential customer: "If your God is so great, why doesn't he speak our language?" Townsend, an amateur at linguistics, set out to put the Cakchiquel language of Guatemala into writing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2003 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
From the day the St. Francis Dam opened in 1926, it leaked. The folks in the farm towns downstream used to joke that they'd see you later "if the dam don't break." Built by William Mulholland, known as the father of Los Angeles' municipal water system, the 1,300-foot span of concrete in San Francisquito Canyon held more than 12 billion gallons -- a year's supply for the entire city about 50 miles to the south.
NEWS
October 29, 1995 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A vision of translating the Bible took hold of salesman William Cameron Townsend of Santa Ana in 1917. He had just arrived in Guatemala, and the Mayan groups he had hoped to reach had little use for his wares: Spanish-language Bibles. His epiphany is said to have come with a question posed by a potential customer: "If your God is so great, why doesn't he speak our language?"
SPORTS
November 8, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
For the umpteenth time in his remarkable career, 32-year-old Sugar Ray Leonard reached down deep and summoned what he needed to fuel his nuclear-powered heart. And he emerged triumphant again in a desperate, exciting battle with a brave Canadian light-heavyweight, Donny Lalonde.
SPORTS
February 21, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They wrapped their arms around each other's shoulders and stood in front of their bench, a human chain as strong as the will of their goaltender. While members of the Czech Republic's Olympic hockey team watched Dominik Hasek stymie Canada in the tiebreaking shootout of their semifinal game Friday, they prayed for a successful outcome. Better yet, they had Hasek in goal.
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