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Ray Stark

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Ray Stark, legendary and influential Hollywood insider for six decades as literary and talent agent, studio dealmaker and producer of such classics as Richard Burton's film "Night of the Iguana" and Barbra Streisand's first movie and star-making musical, "Funny Girl," died early Saturday. He was 88. Stark died in his sleep at his Holmby Hills home on Los Angeles' Westside, said publicist Warren Cowan. The producer had been in declining health since suffering a stroke a few years ago.
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FOOD
June 1, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
Here are six restaurants that I think have exceptionally interesting wine programs. Spago: One of the few restaurants in the country that can boast a full complement of great Austrian wines, especially Rieslings and Grüner Veltliners from the Wachau. Master Sommelier Christopher Miller is approachable and particularly astute at matching wines with the dishes at Wolfgang Puck's flagship restaurant. His list is impressive and deep yet has plenty of cutting-edge wines too. 176 N. Cañon Drive, Beverly Hills, (310)
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NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
Rum Tasting: On Thursday, the Armory Center for the Arts is hosting a rum tasting at Everson Royce from 6 to 8 p.m. Attendees will sample a spectrum of rums from light to dark and young to  old, all served straight, in addition to rum-based cocktails crafted by Talmadge Lowe of Pharmacie LA . The rum tasting costs $45 per person; a portion of the proceeds will go to supporting the Armory Center for the Arts. Reservations can be made by calling (626) 765-9334. 155 N. Raymond Ave., Pasadena, (626)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Stark to Make Nabisco Story: Backed by Columbia Pictures, producer Ray Stark ("Steel Magnolias") has landed film rights to the nonfiction best seller, "Barbarians at the Gate: The Fall of RJR Nabisco," written by Wall Street Journal reporters Bryan Burrough and John Helyar, who covered the breaking story of the 1988 $25-billion leveraged buy-out of the company.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
In a surprising acquisition that trumpets a new direction for the J. Paul Getty Museum's collections and is expected to transform the grounds of the Getty Center, the Getty Trust has received 28 modern sculptures from the estate of the late film producer Ray Stark and his wife, Fran. The donation ranges from a 1911 torso by Aristide Maillol to a 1988 abstraction by Ellsworth Kelly and includes pieces by renowned figures such as Alberto Giacometti, Henry Moore and Alexander Calder.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2007 | Lynne Heffley
WITH the donation of 28 modern sculptures to the J. Paul Getty Museum from the collection of the late film producer Ray Stark and his wife, Fran, works by contemporary artists have sprung up al fresco all over the Getty Center -- on the plaza, the stairs, in gardens and other spots throughout the institution's hilltop Los Angeles campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1988
I read in the L.A. Times about Ray Stark's reaction to Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert's review of "Biloxi Blues" (Morning Report, April 29). While I don't always agree with Siskel and Ebert, I wouldn't conceive of retaliating against them if they didn't agree with or support my perception or evaluation of a movie! I think Stark's reaction and subsequent punishment of the two critics is both childish and demeaning and adversely reflects not only on the movie industry but also on Stark.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1992 | Jeffrey Wells, (Wells was hired by Stark in 1989 to co-author, with the late Stuart Byron, a critical overview of the Houdini project but has no financial interest in it.)
When director Robert Zemeckis ("Death Becomes Her," "Back to the Future") walked away from producer Ray Stark's "The Great Houdini"--written by Peter Seaman and Jeffrey Price ("Who Framed Roger Rabbit")--last month, it was the latest in a series of setbacks that Stark has endured on the project, which has had an 18-year development process that's frustrated eight major writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1988 | Pat H. Broeske
During his micro reign at Columbia Pictures, David Puttnam has always seemed among the most accessible studio bosses. (He once called Outtakes from a phone booth at a London airport to clarify a point in an item!) So it was curious that he wasn't present in Aaron Latham's opus on Puttnam's hazardous duty tour--titled "Puttnam Busters"--in the November issue of Manhattan Inc., complete with an illustration in which a rather ghostly Puttnam is popping out of the "Ghostbusters" logo.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2011 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
With the New Year just around the bend and the holiday party season nearing an epic close, what better way to ready yourself for the cold winter to come than by cozying up by your gas-burning L.A. fire log with a delicious heated cup of alcohol and spices. Ray's and Stark Bar, the artsy den of libation at LACMA, has just the thing: a cleverly named drink called Bobbin' for Bourbon, which combines apple-infused bourbon (yum!) with tart lemon juice, raspberry tea and a tingly rush of clove, cinnamon and nutmeg.
FOOD
June 9, 2011 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
Restaurants with a view usually come in two varieties: landscape or cityscape. The new Ray's and Stark Bar at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art have a view. But it's not the ocean or the city lights spread on a starry carpet below. Instead, the new museum restaurant revels in a wide, sweeping view of the Resnick Exhibition Pavilion designed by Renzo Piano. In other words, great architecture. Now museums aren't, in general, known for harboring distinguished restaurants. And the original one at LACMA (like this one, also run by the Patina Restaurant Group)
FOOD
June 9, 2011
Ray's and Stark Bar Rating: two and a half stars Rating is based on food, service and ambience, with price taken into account in relation to quality. . . : Outstanding on every level. . : Excellent. . : Very good. : Good. No star: Poor to satisfactory. LOCATION Los Angeles County Museum of Art, adjacent to the Resnick Exhibition Pavilion, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 857-6180, http://www.lacma.org PRICE First courses, $8 to $16; main courses, $23 to $31; desserts, $9. DETAILS Open noon to 3 p.m. and 5 to 10 p.m. Thursday to Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2007 | Lynne Heffley
WITH the donation of 28 modern sculptures to the J. Paul Getty Museum from the collection of the late film producer Ray Stark and his wife, Fran, works by contemporary artists have sprung up al fresco all over the Getty Center -- on the plaza, the stairs, in gardens and other spots throughout the institution's hilltop Los Angeles campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
In a surprising acquisition that trumpets a new direction for the J. Paul Getty Museum's collections and is expected to transform the grounds of the Getty Center, the Getty Trust has received 28 modern sculptures from the estate of the late film producer Ray Stark and his wife, Fran. The donation ranges from a 1911 torso by Aristide Maillol to a 1988 abstraction by Ellsworth Kelly and includes pieces by renowned figures such as Alberto Giacometti, Henry Moore and Alexander Calder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Ray Stark, legendary and influential Hollywood insider for six decades as literary and talent agent, studio dealmaker and producer of such classics as Richard Burton's film "Night of the Iguana" and Barbra Streisand's first movie and star-making musical, "Funny Girl," died early Saturday. He was 88. Stark died in his sleep at his Holmby Hills home on Los Angeles' Westside, said publicist Warren Cowan. The producer had been in declining health since suffering a stroke a few years ago.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1992 | From Times Staff Writers
Not satisfied to have Hollywood's top agent helping its cause, Coca-Cola is also getting advice from one of the film industry's top producers. Ray Stark, whose films include "Funny Girl" and "The Way We Were," has conceived a commercial for Coke that is a parody of the upcoming Columbia Pictures release, "Bram Stoker's Dracula"--a film he is not personally affiliated with.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1988 | JACK MATHEWS
For months, people close to the David Puttnam and Ray Stark camps have been looking ahead to the April, 1988, issue of Vanity Fair as if it were a crucial opinion being written by the Supreme Court. Would the scheduled article by writer-editor Tina Brown rule in favor of Puttnam, as most others in the media have already done?
MAGAZINE
November 7, 1999
SHANE BLACK If Shane Black now looks out on an overheated, youth-obsessed screenwriting market where age 37 looks a little long in the tooth, he has partly himself to thank. After selling his "Lethal Weapon" script to Warner Bros.
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