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Ray Stricklyn

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2002 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Stricklyn, an actor who scored his greatest triumph in the mid-1980s after abandoning his once promising acting career a decade earlier and becoming a highly respected Hollywood publicist, has died. He was 73. Stricklyn, whose one-man show as Tennessee Williams earned him critical praise and a new lease on his former career, died Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles after a long battle with chronic emphysema.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2002
A memorial service for actor and publicist Ray Stricklyn will be held at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the Canon Theatre, 209 N. Canon Drive, Beverly Hills. Stricklyn died May 14 after a long battle with emphysema. He was 73.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1991 | SUSAN KING
Ray Stricklyn remembers when he arrived in Hollywood--Sept. 30, 1955--the day James Dean perished in a fatal car crash. "Jimmy and I were friends in New York," Stricklyn says. "It was a very sad occasion." Hollywood tried to mold Stricklyn into a Dean clone, playing various rebels without causes in such films as "Ten North Frederick." "I fit the age bracket and the look at the time," he says. "I had the same agent as Sal Mineo, so I got a lot of Sal's rejects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2002 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Stricklyn, an actor who scored his greatest triumph in the mid-1980s after abandoning his once promising acting career a decade earlier and becoming a highly respected Hollywood publicist, has died. He was 73. Stricklyn, whose one-man show as Tennessee Williams earned him critical praise and a new lease on his former career, died Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles after a long battle with chronic emphysema.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the prologue of his engrossing and candid memoir, "Angels & Demons: One Actor's Hollywood Journey," Ray Stricklyn writes that he "might qualify as one who has had his 15 minutes in the limelight; perhaps even 20." It's typical of Stricklyn, a veteran screen and stage actor, to have such an accurate and witty perspective on his career. When Stricklyn fell ill in 1997 and learned he was suffering from emphysema, he felt the urge to write his autobiography.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2002
A memorial service for actor and publicist Ray Stricklyn will be held at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the Canon Theatre, 209 N. Canon Drive, Beverly Hills. Stricklyn died May 14 after a long battle with emphysema. He was 73.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1988
Sullivan's neglected to mention one of the most successful productions to emerge from the Equity Waiver scene--"Confessions of a Nightingale." And, arguably, it is the most successful in terms of an actor "getting a piece of the action." Ray Stricklyn's one-man odyssey as Tennessee Williams has been playing (almost) continuously since it premiered (Jan. 1985) at the Beverly Hills Playhouse--from its New York run to a national tour to its recent Edinburgh Festival booking.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Ray Stricklyn's one-man tribute to Tennessee Williams, "Confessions of a Nightingale," appears to have landed safely in New York. First seen last year at the Beverly Hills Playhouse, Stricklyn's solo portrait of the playwright opened last week Off-Broadway to mostly good reviews. Variety's reviewer was huffy, calling the show "an exercise in exploitation and celebrity-mongering, unredeemed by its star."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
Ray Stricklyn's one-man Tennessee Williams show, "Confessions of a Nightingale," is a deft impersonation, but it isn't much of a play. Perhaps because of the nature of the genre as well as the writing of the piece, it shows off Stricklyn more than it illuminates Williams--unless, of course, Stricklyn intends to depict Williams as a self-absorbed windbag.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1988 | RAY LOYND
No year-end wrap-up can ignore the impact of Del Shores' "Daddy's Dyin' (Who's Got the Will?)." It's the Equity-Waiver success story of the year. "Daddy's Dyin' . . ." is almost a commercial affront to Waiver--the show makes money. The actors have been sharing in the profits every week since the current comedy premiered at Theatre/Theater 10 months ago. Critically, it's also among the 11 superlative productions--of 95--that I reviewed in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the prologue of his engrossing and candid memoir, "Angels & Demons: One Actor's Hollywood Journey," Ray Stricklyn writes that he "might qualify as one who has had his 15 minutes in the limelight; perhaps even 20." It's typical of Stricklyn, a veteran screen and stage actor, to have such an accurate and witty perspective on his career. When Stricklyn fell ill in 1997 and learned he was suffering from emphysema, he felt the urge to write his autobiography.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1991 | SUSAN KING
Ray Stricklyn remembers when he arrived in Hollywood--Sept. 30, 1955--the day James Dean perished in a fatal car crash. "Jimmy and I were friends in New York," Stricklyn says. "It was a very sad occasion." Hollywood tried to mold Stricklyn into a Dean clone, playing various rebels without causes in such films as "Ten North Frederick." "I fit the age bracket and the look at the time," he says. "I had the same agent as Sal Mineo, so I got a lot of Sal's rejects.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1988
Sullivan's neglected to mention one of the most successful productions to emerge from the Equity Waiver scene--"Confessions of a Nightingale." And, arguably, it is the most successful in terms of an actor "getting a piece of the action." Ray Stricklyn's one-man odyssey as Tennessee Williams has been playing (almost) continuously since it premiered (Jan. 1985) at the Beverly Hills Playhouse--from its New York run to a national tour to its recent Edinburgh Festival booking.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Ray Stricklyn's one-man tribute to Tennessee Williams, "Confessions of a Nightingale," appears to have landed safely in New York. First seen last year at the Beverly Hills Playhouse, Stricklyn's solo portrait of the playwright opened last week Off-Broadway to mostly good reviews. Variety's reviewer was huffy, calling the show "an exercise in exploitation and celebrity-mongering, unredeemed by its star."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1988 | NANCY CHURNIN
Last June, when actress Debra Mooney was at the Old Globe Theatre performing in Tennessee Williams' "The Night of the Iguana," she talked about the playwright who had praised her college performance in his "A Streetcar Named Desire" and remained her friend until his death four years ago at age 73. All of Williams' characters have something in common, she said. They are all facets of one personality: his.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Ray Stricklyn's Tennessee Williams is getting to be as well-traveled as Hal Holbrook's Mark Twain. Stricklyn has just returned from the Edinburgh Festival, where his one-man evening with Tennessee, "Confessions of a Nightingale," received notices that Williams would have given a lot for, in his last years as a playwright.
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