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September 23, 2007 | Helena María Viramontes, Helena María Viramontes is a professor of creative writing at Cornell University. Her latest novel is "Their Dogs Came With Them."
IN 1999, in an attempt to gain recognition for Chicanos and other Latinos who had served in the U.S. armed forces, cultural critic Jorge Mariscal uncovered a lapse in administering the English-proficiency programs in Puerto Rico during the Vietnam War. Because the Army had not complied with its own rules for the testing of non-English-speaking inductees, many of those sent off to Vietnam could barely understand the commands they were given in the field.
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September 23, 2007 | Helena María Viramontes, Helena María Viramontes is a professor of creative writing at Cornell University. Her latest novel is "Their Dogs Came With Them."
IN 1999, in an attempt to gain recognition for Chicanos and other Latinos who had served in the U.S. armed forces, cultural critic Jorge Mariscal uncovered a lapse in administering the English-proficiency programs in Puerto Rico during the Vietnam War. Because the Army had not complied with its own rules for the testing of non-English-speaking inductees, many of those sent off to Vietnam could barely understand the commands they were given in the field.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1996 | Judith Michaelson
'It's not a slash-and-burn, rough talk show like so many others," host Ray Suarez says of his popular "Talk of the Nation." "This is more like a conversation."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1996 | Judith Michaelson
'It's not a slash-and-burn, rough talk show like so many others," host Ray Suarez says of his popular "Talk of the Nation." "This is more like a conversation."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2006
RE "Katie Couric on the Hustings," by Matea Gold, July 12: CBS executive producer Rome Hartman said he was "really struck by how people [in town hall meetings] kept saying that they want depth and they want serious journalism." There is a proven formula for achieving those ends. First, you extend the evening news to one hour. Then you hire intelligent, articulate reporters and interviewers -- say, Gwen Ifill, Ray Suarez, Margaret Warner, Jeffrey Brown -- and then ... well, why not just import the PBS "News-Hour with Jim Lehrer" crew to CBS?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1993 | CONSELLA A. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calls from across the nation poured in Monday to First African Methodist Episcopal Church, where National Public Radio's "Talk of the Nation" tapped what people were thinking two days after verdicts in the Rodney G. King civil rights case. While the hodgepodge of questions to the national call-in show--which will air from the church through Thursday--was varied, racial issues and economics were at the crux of the responses.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2009 | Tony Perry
Occasionally comes a documentary whose title tells it all. Such an event is "Jerusalem: Center of the World," with the secondary title: "The Epic History of the World's Most Contested Piece of Real Estate." The two-hour program airs tonight at 9 on KCET. Ray Suarez, senior correspondent for PBS' "The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer," walks the viewer through a city at the crossroads of three religions, where turmoil and contention are ever-present.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2000
Some broadcast and cable programs contain material included in the public school curriculum and on standardized examinations. Here are home-viewing tips: * Today-- "The Devil's Arithmetic" (ODSY 9-11 p.m.) is a movie about a girl who is magically transported to 1941 Poland, where she learns valuable lessons when she is arrested by Nazis. Kirsten Dunst stars. Also, "Sixth Sun: The Mayan Uprising in Chiapas" (KLCS 9-10 p.m.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2006 | Ruth Morris, South Florida Sun-Sentinel
CNN's famously blunt anchor Lou Dobbs took on ideological foes Friday, telling an audience of Hispanic journalists that the United States was the "candy-rock mountain of the world" being chipped away by immigration policies meant to protect corporate interests. Dobbs debated with former Mexican Foreign Minister Jorge Castaneda; New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson; and the Rev. David Beckmann, president of Bread for the World. It was an immigration debate punctuated by jokes and sharp jabs.
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