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Ray Turner

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2006 | Greg Krikorian, Times Staff Writer
A former SBC employee facing retrial after a jury cleared her of four of five charges in the Anthony Pellicano wire-tapping investigation has asked a federal judge to throw out her indictment on the grounds that the government's new prosecution is tantamount to double jeopardy. In a motion filed with U.S. District Judge Dale S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2006 | Greg Krikorian, Times Staff Writer
A former SBC employee facing retrial after a jury cleared her of four of five charges in the Anthony Pellicano wire-tapping investigation has asked a federal judge to throw out her indictment on the grounds that the government's new prosecution is tantamount to double jeopardy. In a motion filed with U.S. District Judge Dale S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1992 | Dana Parsons
A funny thing happened this week on Ray Turner's lifelong journey toward professional anonymity. He got famous. Turner is a processes engineer at Hughes Aircraft Co. in Fullerton. Let's just say they don't make TV movies out of jobs like that. He's been there since 1969, and it's his job to make sure that Hughes products meet military specifications. Highly competent, yes, but nobody confused Turner with one of the best and brightest Ph.D.s or high-tech whiz kids.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1992 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times
You would think that a simple, cheap and ingeniously "green" solution to an environmentally hostile manufacturing problem would be an instant winner in today's cost-conscious marketplace. Absolutely not. Even low-risk, high-benefit green innovations take longer than expected to move into the market when they're faced with red tape and industrial inertia. Just ask Ray Turner.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Newton, the apple and gravity, fruit once again has played a big role in a scientific discovery. But instead of getting bopped like Sir Isaac on the noggin, Ray Turner reached into his refrigerator for a lemon and came away with a startling solution to one of the more daunting environmental problems facing mankind. After a few false starts one evening at his La Habra home, the longtime Hughes Aircraft Co.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1992 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times
You would think that a simple, cheap and ingeniously "green" solution to an environmentally hostile manufacturing problem would be an instant winner in today's cost-conscious marketplace. Absolutely not. Even low-risk, high-benefit green innovations take longer than expected to move into the market when they're faced with red tape and industrial inertia. Just ask Ray Turner.
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Newton, the apple and gravity, fruit once again has played a big role in a scientific discovery. But instead of getting bopped on the noggin like Sir Isaac, Ray Turner reached into his refrigerator for a lemon and came away with a startling solution to one of the more daunting environmental dilemmas facing mankind. After a few false starts one evening at his La Habra home, the longtime Hughes Aircraft Co.
SPORTS
December 16, 1988
Ray Schwengel of Brea-Olinda High School was named the Orange League's water polo player of the year by a vote of the league's coaches. Brea-Olinda had three players named to the all-league first team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1992
A disabled tanker truck leaking waste from an oil refinery shut down all southbound traffic on the Golden State Freeway in Santa Clarita for more than three hours Tuesday, the California Highway Patrol said. The truck, en route from Bakersfield to Wilmington, stalled about 3:30 p.m. two miles south of Calgrove Boulevard when driver Ray Turner, 33, noticed that the tank was leaking, said CHP Capt. Greg Augusta.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Newton, the apple and gravity, fruit once again has played a big role in a scientific discovery. But instead of getting bopped like Sir Isaac on the noggin, Ray Turner reached into his refrigerator for a lemon and came away with a startling solution to one of the more daunting environmental problems facing mankind. After a few false starts one evening at his La Habra home, the longtime Hughes Aircraft Co.
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Newton, the apple and gravity, fruit once again has played a big role in a scientific discovery. But instead of getting bopped on the noggin like Sir Isaac, Ray Turner reached into his refrigerator for a lemon and came away with a startling solution to one of the more daunting environmental dilemmas facing mankind. After a few false starts one evening at his La Habra home, the longtime Hughes Aircraft Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1992 | Dana Parsons
A funny thing happened this week on Ray Turner's lifelong journey toward professional anonymity. He got famous. Turner is a processes engineer at Hughes Aircraft Co. in Fullerton. Let's just say they don't make TV movies out of jobs like that. He's been there since 1969, and it's his job to make sure that Hughes products meet military specifications. Highly competent, yes, but nobody confused Turner with one of the best and brightest Ph.D.s or high-tech whiz kids.
SPORTS
November 20, 1987
Magnolia High School's Dave Cameron was named the Orange League's water polo player of the year in a vote by league coaches. The Orange all-league teams were dominated by Brea-Olinda, which had four players named to the first team and one selected to the second team. Brea-Olinda's Jon Stockdale was selected first-team goalie, and Fili Qunitero of Anaheim was named the goalie of the second team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2008 | Victoria Kim
Convicted private eye Anthony Pellicano and two co-defendants should forfeit more than $2 million in proceeds from Pellicano's wiretapping and racketeering business that catered to Hollywood's elite, a federal judge said Wednesday. Former police sergeant Mark Arneson and phone company insider Ray Turner will have to shoulder the sum along with Pellicano, who in two criminal trials this year was convicted of 78 counts. Prosecutors alleged that the two provided Pellicano with information he needed to wiretap and intimidate his clients' foes.
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