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Ray Walston

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1992 | JANICE ARKATOV
For a lot of people, Ray Walston will always be Uncle Martin. "It took me a while to get used to it," Walston says of his enduring popularity as Bill Bixby's extraterrestrial "uncle"--complete with pop-up antennae and magical powers--in the 1963-66 TV series "My Favorite Martian." On the streets of Los Angeles, in Spain, in Malta and even behind the Iron Curtain, he says, "People point at me, ask me crazy questions. I thought it would go away, never last. But the power of TV is mind-boggling."
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OPINION
January 7, 2001
America has lost another consummate actor in the passing of Ray Walston (Jan. 3). The man was blessed with outstanding talent, an ability to get inside a character as if he was actually born the person he was portraying. I had the good fortune, in the early 1950s, to follow Ray playing Luther Billis in the London company of "South Pacific" with Mary Martin. And of all the Billises in all the many productions of that landmark show, it was Ray who was chosen to play the part in the movie version.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Walston, whose three-year turn as a sitcom Martian gave him a public profile but only scratched the surface of the talent he showed in a seven-decade acting career on stage and screen and in television, died Monday at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 86. The winner of two Emmy Awards and a Tony Award, Walston made his last appearance in an episode of the CBS drama "Touched by an Angel," which aired in October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Walston, whose three-year turn as a sitcom Martian gave him a public profile but only scratched the surface of the talent he showed in a seven-decade acting career on stage and screen and in television, died Monday at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 86. The winner of two Emmy Awards and a Tony Award, Walston made his last appearance in an episode of the CBS drama "Touched by an Angel," which aired in October.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meeting actor Ray Walston over lunch is like encountering crusty Judge Henry Bone, his character on CBS' "Picket Fences," in chambers. A spare man in a crisp summer-blue suit, Walston instantly projects an air of correctness and no-nonsense authority. A knife becomes his gavel; a linen napkin, which he folds into a long rectangle, a legal document. He is not averse to raising his voice or jabbing the air with his finger.
OPINION
January 7, 2001
America has lost another consummate actor in the passing of Ray Walston (Jan. 3). The man was blessed with outstanding talent, an ability to get inside a character as if he was actually born the person he was portraying. I had the good fortune, in the early 1950s, to follow Ray playing Luther Billis in the London company of "South Pacific" with Mary Martin. And of all the Billises in all the many productions of that landmark show, it was Ray who was chosen to play the part in the movie version.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Bixby, television actor, director and producer best known for his starring role as Dr. David Bruce Banner on "The Incredible Hulk," has died. He was 59. Bixby, who also starred in the series "My Favorite Martian" and "The Courtship of Eddie's Father," died Sunday afternoon at his home in Century City of cancer that had spread through his body during the past year. His wife, Judith Kliban-Bixby, was with him at the time of his death.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Never underestimate the artistic potential of a Z-budget, tasteless, overviolent horror movie. You could be watching something like the Sam Raimi-Coen brothers' "Evil Dead." On the other hand, you could be watching "Blood Salvage" (selected theaters). In this lame try at a gross-out programmer, three fanatic or cretinous backwoods buffoons, kidnap a bland yuppie Georgia family, the Evanses, and torture them for a day or two.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1986 | Patrick Goldstein
You can't say the producers of CBS's new TV version of "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" haven't gone the extra mile to capture the spirit of the original hit film. The show, which debuts March 5, has recruited Amy Heckerling, the film's original director, to serve as supervising producer and to direct several episodes. Other carry-overs from the film will be Ray Walston, reprising his role as Mr. Hand, and Vincent Schiavelli as Mr. Vargas.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meeting actor Ray Walston over lunch is like encountering crusty Judge Henry Bone, his character on CBS' "Picket Fences," in chambers. A spare man in a crisp summer-blue suit, Walston instantly projects an air of correctness and no-nonsense authority. A knife becomes his gavel; a linen napkin, which he folds into a long rectangle, a legal document. He is not averse to raising his voice or jabbing the air with his finger.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1992 | JANICE ARKATOV
For a lot of people, Ray Walston will always be Uncle Martin. "It took me a while to get used to it," Walston says of his enduring popularity as Bill Bixby's extraterrestrial "uncle"--complete with pop-up antennae and magical powers--in the 1963-66 TV series "My Favorite Martian." On the streets of Los Angeles, in Spain, in Malta and even behind the Iron Curtain, he says, "People point at me, ask me crazy questions. I thought it would go away, never last. But the power of TV is mind-boggling."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2003 | Elaine Dutka
In the wake of the box office success of "Chicago," winner of this year's best picture Oscar and Miramax Films' highest-grossing movie ever, the studio plans to turn the 1955 Broadway hit "Damn Yankees" into a feature film. Craig Zadan and Neil Meron, executive producers of "Chicago," are set to produce the musical.
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