Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRay York
IN THE NEWS

Ray York

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
September 13, 1994 | JIM MURRAY
Jockey Ray York, packing 120 pounds, finished last in a derby at Del Mar the other day. "Wait a minute!" you say. "Ray York? What kind of a time warp is this? Ray York hasn't been on a racetrack in 10 years. What is this, 1953?" Besides, Ray York wouldn't finish last on a rocking horse. He won the Kentucky Derby, no less. Not many jockeys can make that claim. Ray rode the great Determine in his best years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 14, 2000 | BILL CHRISTINE
Jockey Ray York finished next to last in the last race at Santa Anita on Thursday, but . . . "I'm the happiest man in the world," he said. "I just broke a record." By riding Culebra, a 37-1 shot, for trainer Henry Moreno in the seven-furlong claiming race, the 66-year-old York, it is believed, became the first jockey to have ridden in seven decades. Winner of the Kentucky Derby with Determine in 1954, York began his career in 1949.
Advertisement
SPORTS
January 14, 2000 | BILL CHRISTINE
Jockey Ray York finished next to last in the last race at Santa Anita on Thursday, but . . . "I'm the happiest man in the world," he said. "I just broke a record." By riding Culebra, a 37-1 shot, for trainer Henry Moreno in the seven-furlong claiming race, the 66-year-old York, it is believed, became the first jockey to have ridden in seven decades. Winner of the Kentucky Derby with Determine in 1954, York began his career in 1949.
SPORTS
January 12, 2000 | BILL PLASCHKE
They aren't torn in two like a losing parimutuel ticket. They aren't tossed in the wastebasket like yesterday's tout sheet. Nobody sends them to a faraway field when they're too old to run. In the disposable world that is horse racing, they are the only ones who hang around long after their final race is over. They are the retired jockeys. You only think they've disappeared. "When you're done riding, it seems like you get put in the back seat," Ray York said. "Everybody loves a winner.
SPORTS
January 12, 2000 | BILL PLASCHKE
They aren't torn in two like a losing parimutuel ticket. They aren't tossed in the wastebasket like yesterday's tout sheet. Nobody sends them to a faraway field when they're too old to run. In the disposable world that is horse racing, they are the only ones who hang around long after their final race is over. They are the retired jockeys. You only think they've disappeared. "When you're done riding, it seems like you get put in the back seat," Ray York said. "Everybody loves a winner.
SPORTS
January 9, 2000 | BOB MIESZERSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Those who preferred Swept Overboard over Forest Camp in the $107,200 San Miguel Stakes Saturday at Santa Anita were happy about the outcome. How Swept Overboard won for the second time in three starts was the surprising part of the Grade III sprint. Expected to be in front from the outset, the gray son of End Sweep and 19-10 second choice in the field of six 3-year-olds broke slowly, seemingly hurting his chances of beating Del Mar Futurity winner and 7-10 favorite Forest Camp.
SPORTS
September 8, 1995 | BOB MIESZERSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Corey Nakatani, battling Chris McCarron and Alex Solis for the jockey title here, has changed his post-Del Mar plans. Originally scheduled to go to Belmont Park after the Del Mar meeting ends Wednesday, to ride until Oct. 4, when the Oak Tree meeting begins at Santa Anita, Nakatani will now go to Europe to ride for Juddmonte Farms for a couple of weeks.
SPORTS
September 11, 1995 | BOB MIESZERSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chris McCarron won the Fantastic Girl with Track Gal on opening day almost seven weeks ago, and the stakes victories have kept right on coming. The leading stakes-winning rider in Del Mar history made it 97 for his career and 11 for this meeting, guiding Alphabet Soup to a three-quarters-of-a-length victory over Lykatill Hil in the $200,000 added Del Mar Budweiser Breeders' Cup Handicap on Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2009 | Pete Thomas
Hall of Fame jockey Ismael "Milo" Valenzuela, who won both the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes in 1958 and 1968 and retired with a remarkable 2,545 overall triumphs, died Wednesday at his Arcadia home after a lengthy illness. He was 74. Valenzuela, one of 22 children born to parents who had immigrated to the United States from Mexico, rose to prominence at Southern California racetracks before branching out to become nationally famous. He had a powerful yet smooth style, comparable to that of the legendary Eddie Arcaro, and was known as being especially capable aboard feisty 2-year-olds.
SPORTS
September 6, 1996 | BOB MIESZERSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray York is the defending champion in the Rocking Chair Derby, and the 62-year-old former jockey has the horse to beat again this year. For the ninth time on Saturday, Del Mar will stage an exhibition featuring seven retired riders. The race, with $32,000 maidens going 5 1/2 furlongs, will be run between the seventh and eighth races. York, who began galloping horses last weekend for trainer Henry Moreno to get in shape, rode Push 'M High to a two-length victory in 1995.
SPORTS
September 13, 1994 | JIM MURRAY
Jockey Ray York, packing 120 pounds, finished last in a derby at Del Mar the other day. "Wait a minute!" you say. "Ray York? What kind of a time warp is this? Ray York hasn't been on a racetrack in 10 years. What is this, 1953?" Besides, Ray York wouldn't finish last on a rocking horse. He won the Kentucky Derby, no less. Not many jockeys can make that claim. Ray rode the great Determine in his best years.
SPORTS
December 26, 2002 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
There are 15 races at Santa Anita older than the Malibu Stakes, but since the 50-year-old Malibu was re-positioned to the day after Christmas in 1984, it has acquired the patina of some of the older fixtures. An opening day at Santa Anita without the Malibu would be like a Dec. 26 without standing in the exchange line.
SPORTS
November 16, 1987 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Robert Hyatt (Red) McDaniel, the winningest trainer in the United States through the first five years of the 1950s, was hydrophobic. The only way to get McDaniel into a swimming pool would have been to fill it with martinis. On May 5, 1955, the 44-year-old McDaniel helped jockey Ralph Neves mount a 5-year-old gelding running in the sixth race at Golden Gate Fields.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|