Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRaymond Barre
IN THE NEWS

Raymond Barre

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
President Francois Mitterrand finished far in front in the first round of the French presidential election Sunday and called on all voters to help him defeat Premier Jacques Chirac, the battered and distant runner-up, in the final round in two weeks. The mathematics of the first round results appeared to favor Mitterrand, a Socialist, in the May 8 runoff.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Raymond Barre, a tough-speaking former French prime minister and economist who refused to bow to protesters or political alliances, died Saturday, his family said. He was 83. Barre died at Val de Grace hospital in Paris, family members said. An exact cause of death was not immediately available, but he was admitted to the hospital April 12 -- his 83rd birthday -- after suffering from heart problems in Monaco, where he was to give a speech on world finance.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 30, 1985 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
As the interviewer stood at a lectern and looked down at him, President Francois Mitterrand of France sat stiffly, smiling wanly. He was as nervous as a contestant on a television quiz show. One of the first questions from the interviewer, a popular television anchor named Yves Mourousi, was tricky. Mourousi wanted to know if Mitterrand regarded himself as a chebran president.
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Premier Jacques Chirac met with his closest lieutenants Monday to map out a campaign for the difficult task of mustering enough support to defeat President Francois Mitterrand in the final round of the French presidential election. Although a columnist for Le Figaro, the conservative Paris newspaper that supports Chirac fervently, wrote that French rightists "have no reason to look on the game as lost," most political analysts were skeptical about Chirac's chances.
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Premier Jacques Chirac met with his closest lieutenants Monday to map out a campaign for the difficult task of mustering enough support to defeat President Francois Mitterrand in the final round of the French presidential election. Although a columnist for Le Figaro, the conservative Paris newspaper that supports Chirac fervently, wrote that French rightists "have no reason to look on the game as lost," most political analysts were skeptical about Chirac's chances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Raymond Barre, a tough-speaking former French prime minister and economist who refused to bow to protesters or political alliances, died Saturday, his family said. He was 83. Barre died at Val de Grace hospital in Paris, family members said. An exact cause of death was not immediately available, but he was admitted to the hospital April 12 -- his 83rd birthday -- after suffering from heart problems in Monaco, where he was to give a speech on world finance.
NEWS
February 9, 1988
Former French Premier Raymond Barre, 63, announced that he will run in the April 24 presidential election. Barre, a deputy in Parliament and a professor of economics, served as premier from 1976 to 1981 during the presidency of Valery Giscard d'Estaing. Barre's announcement left the Socialists as the only major political party without a declared candidate--the Socialists are waiting for President Francois Mitterrand to disclose his intentions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
A woman believed to have been the oldest woman in France has died at the age of 112, the City Council said. Eugenie Roux, who was born Jan. 24, 1874, in the eastern Jura Mountains, died June 21. In recent years, after becoming the oldest known Frenchwoman, she was visited each birthday by former Premier Raymond Barre, elected from Lyon to the National Assembly, and by Lyon Mayor Francisque Colomb.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1985 | From Reuters
An orange soft drink company is to become the first sponsor of French state-owned television, hosting a comedy show peppered with flimsily clad chorus girls and political parody, the TF-1 network has reported. TF-1 president Herve Bourges said Orangina would sponsor 30% of "Cocoricocowboy," a prime-time show popular for its Coco girls and animal puppets in the likeness of France's leading political figures.
NEWS
May 15, 1989 | Compiled by Alma Cook, Times researcher
Claremont McKenna College held its 42nd commencement Sunday on campus in Badgley Garden. Degrees were conferred on 223 students. An honorary degree was awarded to Dr. Marian Miner Cook, a member of the college's board of trustees. Gov. George Deukmejian concluded his commencement address by telling the graduates: "Challenge yourselves. Be the best you can be. Enrich your profession and your community with honesty, compassion and common sense. Remember that today's limits are tomorrow's frontiers."
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
President Francois Mitterrand finished far in front in the first round of the French presidential election Sunday and called on all voters to help him defeat Premier Jacques Chirac, the battered and distant runner-up, in the final round in two weeks. The mathematics of the first round results appeared to favor Mitterrand, a Socialist, in the May 8 runoff.
NEWS
May 30, 1985 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
As the interviewer stood at a lectern and looked down at him, President Francois Mitterrand of France sat stiffly, smiling wanly. He was as nervous as a contestant on a television quiz show. One of the first questions from the interviewer, a popular television anchor named Yves Mourousi, was tricky. Mourousi wanted to know if Mitterrand regarded himself as a chebran president.
NEWS
March 11, 1985 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
The conservative parties of France dealt a severe political blow to the governing Socialists of President Francois Mitterrand on Sunday by winning more than half the total vote in local elections that were looked on as the last dress rehearsal before next year's decisive National Assembly elections.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|