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Raymond Berry

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March 19, 1989 | JOHN STEADMAN, The Baltimore Evening Sun
Only once in all these years as a daily grind-it-out newspaper reporter has there been the experience of writing a story, scheduling it for publication and then giving in to a request that it be summarily killed. The simple but beautiful details deserve at last to be disclosed, however belatedly, because of their historical human significance, spirit and glory. It was Raymond Berry who checked signals on the story, hoping that what he was doing in Cambridge, Md.
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October 18, 2000 | Times Wire Services
NFL all-time reception leaders: 1. x-Jerry Rice, San Francisco: 1,239 2. x-Cris Carter, Minnesota: 962 3. x-Andre Reed, Washington: 946 4. Art Monk: 940 5. x-Irving Fryar, Washington: 827 6. Steve Largent: 819 7. Henry Ellard: 812 8. x-Tim Brown, Oakland: 801 9. James Lofton: 764 10. Michael Irvin: 750 Charlie Joiner: 750 12. x-Andre Rison, Oakland: 719 13. Gary Clark: 699 14. Ozzie Newsome: 662 15. Charley Taylor: 649 16. x-Herman Moore, Detroit: 638 17. Drew Hill: 634 18.
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September 27, 1985 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
The New England territories have always been leery of their leadership (see: original patriots, 1776), but skepticism of command in those parts has been nowhere so pronounced as in football. You could ask Ron Meyer. You could ask Ron Erhardt. You could even ask Chuck Fairbanks. None of them enjoyed what you might call unquestioned authority. The folks in Foxboro, Mass., home of the New England Patriots, are pretty hard to please when it comes to their whistle-wearing autocrats.
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December 28, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty-one years later, Sam Huff is visited by the same nightmare. It's 1958, back in Yankee Stadium on a cold afternoon, his New York Giants are battling the Baltimore Colts for the NFL title, the game to which all other "great" NFL games are still compared. A second-quarter pass by Johnny Unitas is sailing toward Huff's head and then as now, Huff's mind tells him, "Bat it down! Get a hand on it!" But he can't.
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February 10, 1985 | CLIFF NEWELL, Kerrville Daily Times and Associated Press
He was a skinny, he was slow. One leg was a bit shorter than the other, so he had to wear padding inside one of his shoes. His eyesight was so poor that he had to wear glasses even when he played, and a special cage was fitted inside his helmet to protect them. Naturally, he was injury prone, and he always seemed to be nursing some kind of hurt that season. When his college teammates saw him for the first time, they sarcastically dubbed him, "Jack Armstrong, the All-American Boy."
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January 8, 1986
Raymond Berry, coach of the New England Patriots, was chosen United Press International's AFC Coach of the Year.
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February 19, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Raymond Berry, former coach of the New England Patriots, was hired as quarterback coach of the Detroit Lions. Dave Levy, former USC assistant under John McKay, was hired as offensive coordinator and Charlie Sanders as receivers coach.
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January 23, 1986 | JIM MURRAY
Everybody knows what football coaches look like. Big, thick necks. Wrists like pistons, beard like two miles of barbed-wire. They don't talk, they bellow. They have the nice sweet dispositions of a sergeant whose shoes are too tight and whose stomach hurts. Their attitude is, "I'm giving the orders here!" and the veins stick out in their necks and their eyes bug out when they give them. They answer to the name of Bear or Bum or Bo or Iron Mike, and they have vocabularies of ferryboat captains.
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June 13, 1986 | Associated Press
The New England Patriots rewarded Coach Raymond Berry for his success in the 1985 season with a five-year contract Thursday. Berry, 53, led the Patriots to the American Football Conference championship and the Super Bowl, where they lost to the Chicago Bears, 46-10. Berry replaced Ron Meyer at the midway point of the 1984 season, compiling a 4-4 record. The Patriots were 9-7 overall. In 1985, the Patriots were 11-5, and then won three playoff games on the road to the Super Bowl.
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October 18, 2000 | Times Wire Services
NFL all-time reception leaders: 1. x-Jerry Rice, San Francisco: 1,239 2. x-Cris Carter, Minnesota: 962 3. x-Andre Reed, Washington: 946 4. Art Monk: 940 5. x-Irving Fryar, Washington: 827 6. Steve Largent: 819 7. Henry Ellard: 812 8. x-Tim Brown, Oakland: 801 9. James Lofton: 764 10. Michael Irvin: 750 Charlie Joiner: 750 12. x-Andre Rison, Oakland: 719 13. Gary Clark: 699 14. Ozzie Newsome: 662 15. Charley Taylor: 649 16. x-Herman Moore, Detroit: 638 17. Drew Hill: 634 18.
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May 23, 1991 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before and after football practice each day, John Unitas spent hour after patient hour creating a football player--a Hall of Fame-bound quarterback--a guy named John Unitas. That was 40 years ago. On the playgrounds and practice fields of his time. There, morning, afternoon and evening, Unitas at first aimed for--and then played for--the old Baltimore Colts.
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February 19, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Raymond Berry, former coach of the New England Patriots, was hired as quarterback coach of the Detroit Lions. Dave Levy, former USC assistant under John McKay, was hired as offensive coordinator and Charlie Sanders as receivers coach.
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February 28, 1990 | JOHN STEADMAN, THE BALTIMORE EVENING SUN
When Victor Kiam recovers from the rookie ownership jitters and becomes advanced in the ways of pro football, he belatedly will discover the ideal requirements for a head coach include being knowledgeable of the fundamentals, steeped in the kind of values that never go out of fashion, and having an ability to communicate in a trusting way with players.
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February 28, 1990 | ALAN GREENBERG, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Like most people who live in a fog, former New England Patriots' Coach Raymond Berry never saw his firing coming. Bulwarked by faith and blinded to the reality that his last two Patriots teams were only slightly more appetizing than last year's yogurt, Berry was ready to stay the course, even as it became obvious he had no map or chart to guide him, only a mystical inner compass that he could not or would not explain.
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February 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Raymond Berry was fired Monday as coach of the New England Patriots in a power struggle with General Manager Pat Sullivan. Pittsburgh defensive coordinator Rod Rust reportedly was the top candidate to succeed Berry. The firing apparently centered on Sullivan's desire that Berry go outside the organization to name offensive and defensive coordinators, while Berry apparently wanted to fill those spots from his current staff.
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February 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Rod Rust, who spent 14 seasons as an NFL assistant, has become the second oldest coach in the league, taking over the New England Patriots a day after the team fired Raymond Berry. The 61-year-old Rust, Pittsburgh's defensive coordinator last season, had been the Patriots' defensive coordinator from 1983 to '87, the last 3 1/2 years under Berry. Patriots General Manager Pat Sullivan fired Berry on Monday after a disagreement over the hiring of an offensive coordinator.
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January 5, 1990 | From Associated Press
Raymond Berry is apparently staying on as coach of the New England Patriots in the 1990 National Football League season, fulfilling the final year of his three-year contract and keeping continuity for the team, a Patriots spokesman said today. "That sounds right, but we haven't announced anything," said team spokesman Jim Greenidge. "It's not official."
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February 26, 1990
Raymond Berry, unable to agree with management on the hiring of assistant coaches, might be out as coach of the New England Patriots and Pittsburgh Steelers defensive coordinator Rod Rust might be in, according to a published report in The Boston Globe.
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January 5, 1990 | From Associated Press
Raymond Berry is apparently staying on as coach of the New England Patriots in the 1990 National Football League season, fulfilling the final year of his three-year contract and keeping continuity for the team, a Patriots spokesman said today. "That sounds right, but we haven't announced anything," said team spokesman Jim Greenidge. "It's not official."
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