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NEWS
March 1, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TV Times Staff
Raymond Burr is back as Erle Stanley Gardner's intrepid ace attorney-at-law Perry Mason in the Sunday NBC mystery, "Perry Mason: The Case of the Fatal Framing." This time around, Mason, with the help of his loyal secretary Della Street (Barbara Hale), and investigator Ken Malansky (William R. Moses) must defend a photographer (Mark Moses) who is accused of murdering a painter (David Soul).
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Ironside," the Universal-produced TV series about a wheelchair-bound police detective that ran from 1967 to 1975 on NBC, has been chopped, channeled and reupholstered as "Ironside," a Universal-produced TV series about a wheelchair-bound police detective that premieres Wednesday on NBC. It will last I don't know how long. The cleverer Sherlocks among you will have already deduced what they have in common. One thing they do not have in common, naturally, is the late Raymond Burr, who starred in the first version as a San Francisco police chief-turned-special-consultant after being paralyzed by a sniper's bullet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1989 | RONALD CLARKE, Reuters
Perry Mason has a confession. "In 9 years of defending every criminal television could produce, I actually lost three cases," he says. Mason's real life character, Raymond Burr, lets out a booming laugh. "No, I'm not perfect," he says. Congress had approved a civil rights bill to protect voting rights and the South was in the midst of black student demonstrations when, in 1957, Burr made his television debut as Mason, the daunting defense lawyer who pounded each week into prosecutor Hamilton Burger.
TRAVEL
May 15, 2011
After reading Catharine Hamm's On the Spot column ["Savings Calling," May 1], I thought I needed to contribute my experience in London last March. We stayed in a Premier Inn (Olympia) near Earl's Court. It was supposed to be two singles, but they made a bed out of the "sofa" while my friend had a double bed. The room was large but had no useful furniture. I had to unscrew the desk lamp and perch it on my suitcase in order to read in bed. The bathroom was new but poorly designed, with the toilet right under the very small counter.
NEWS
September 13, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Raymond Burr, who began his dramatic career portraying an unsavory assortment of hoodlums, killers and villains, and climaxed it as the legendary attorney who defended them, died Sunday night at his Sonoma County ranch. He was 76, and had been suffering from cancer, a friend said.
NEWS
June 14, 1987
"Perry Mason: The Case of the Sinister Spirit" was outstanding. The ending was perfect. Actually, the entire was film was great, and Raymond Burr was at his best. Cindy Kahn, Canoga Park
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed like old times for the cast of the NBC series "Ironside" (1967-75) when they reunited last winter in Denver to film Tuesday's NBC movie "The Return of Ironside." "This might sound real strange and corny, but it is just like I saw them all last week," says Elizabeth Bauer, who played policewoman Fran Belding for four seasons. "Everybody looks a little older, but it was exactly the same. No one has changed."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2003 | Lisa Boone and Carolyn Patricia Scott
Kathy Mattea Country singer "My favorite television show is somewhere between 'I Love Lucy,' 'All in the Family' or any Bill Moyers interview or documentary.... We have a TiVo system. We always TiVo 'The West Wing' and 'South Park.' 'The West Wing' provokes me to consider my own opinions and also has a level of humor that I like very much. And actually that's the same thing that you could say about 'South Park.' It's very much social commentary, and that's part of what I like about it.
TRAVEL
May 15, 2011
After reading Catharine Hamm's On the Spot column ["Savings Calling," May 1], I thought I needed to contribute my experience in London last March. We stayed in a Premier Inn (Olympia) near Earl's Court. It was supposed to be two singles, but they made a bed out of the "sofa" while my friend had a double bed. The room was large but had no useful furniture. I had to unscrew the desk lamp and perch it on my suitcase in order to read in bed. The bathroom was new but poorly designed, with the toilet right under the very small counter.
MAGAZINE
January 19, 1986 | RAYMOND BURR, In NBC-TV'S recent "Perry Mason Returns," actor Raymond Burr revived the role he made famous from 1957 through 1966.
"I spend a lot of time traveling. Too much, really. In the past year, I've traveled to Canada, Fiji, Hawaii, the Bahamas and Mexico and have crisscrossed the United States. But when I return to my 40-acre farm in Sonoma County's Dry Creek Valley, where I grow everything from orchids to squash and raise sheep and chickens besides, the strain of being on the road begins to slip away. The first thing I do when I get home is take a long walk around. There's always something new to see.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2003 | Lisa Boone and Carolyn Patricia Scott
Kathy Mattea Country singer "My favorite television show is somewhere between 'I Love Lucy,' 'All in the Family' or any Bill Moyers interview or documentary.... We have a TiVo system. We always TiVo 'The West Wing' and 'South Park.' 'The West Wing' provokes me to consider my own opinions and also has a level of humor that I like very much. And actually that's the same thing that you could say about 'South Park.' It's very much social commentary, and that's part of what I like about it.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1993 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
Just about the last thing on producer Dean Hargrove's mind is even thinking of trying to replace the late Raymond Burr as TV's "Perry Mason." The final original "Perry Mason" episode starring Burr, who died in September, airs on NBC on Monday. And Hargrove, sitting on the couch of his office at Universal Studios, says: "At the moment, there are no specific plans in terms of continuing the franchise. Certainly, the first thing is that no one's going to try to replace Raymond Burr.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The courtroom is still. "If you weren't there," the attorney asks somberly, resting his thick, slabby frame on the witness stand, "then how did you know your husband was dead?" The witness's face hardens. The attorney's unanticipated zinger, worded so precisely and economically, is the spear that impales her. Only moments before, she had been so cool, so confident, so completely in control.
NEWS
September 13, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Raymond Burr, who began his dramatic career portraying an unsavory assortment of hoodlums, killers and villains, and climaxed it as the legendary attorney who defended them, died Sunday night at his Sonoma County ranch. He was 76, and had been suffering from cancer, a friend said.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed like old times for the cast of the NBC series "Ironside" (1967-75) when they reunited last winter in Denver to film Tuesday's NBC movie "The Return of Ironside." "This might sound real strange and corny, but it is just like I saw them all last week," says Elizabeth Bauer, who played policewoman Fran Belding for four seasons. "Everybody looks a little older, but it was exactly the same. No one has changed."
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TV Times Staff
Raymond Burr is back as Erle Stanley Gardner's intrepid ace attorney-at-law Perry Mason in the Sunday NBC mystery, "Perry Mason: The Case of the Fatal Framing." This time around, Mason, with the help of his loyal secretary Della Street (Barbara Hale), and investigator Ken Malansky (William R. Moses) must defend a photographer (Mark Moses) who is accused of murdering a painter (David Soul).
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1993 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
Just about the last thing on producer Dean Hargrove's mind is even thinking of trying to replace the late Raymond Burr as TV's "Perry Mason." The final original "Perry Mason" episode starring Burr, who died in September, airs on NBC on Monday. And Hargrove, sitting on the couch of his office at Universal Studios, says: "At the moment, there are no specific plans in terms of continuing the franchise. Certainly, the first thing is that no one's going to try to replace Raymond Burr.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The courtroom is still. "If you weren't there," the attorney asks somberly, resting his thick, slabby frame on the witness stand, "then how did you know your husband was dead?" The witness's face hardens. The attorney's unanticipated zinger, worded so precisely and economically, is the spear that impales her. Only moments before, she had been so cool, so confident, so completely in control.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1989 | RONALD CLARKE, Reuters
Perry Mason has a confession. "In 9 years of defending every criminal television could produce, I actually lost three cases," he says. Mason's real life character, Raymond Burr, lets out a booming laugh. "No, I'm not perfect," he says. Congress had approved a civil rights bill to protect voting rights and the South was in the midst of black student demonstrations when, in 1957, Burr made his television debut as Mason, the daunting defense lawyer who pounded each week into prosecutor Hamilton Burger.
NEWS
June 14, 1987
"Perry Mason: The Case of the Sinister Spirit" was outstanding. The ending was perfect. Actually, the entire was film was great, and Raymond Burr was at his best. Cindy Kahn, Canoga Park
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