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Raymond C Fisher

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1999 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
President Clinton on Monday nominated Raymond C. Fisher, the third-highest ranking official in the U.S. Justice Department and a longtime leader in the Los Angeles legal community, to a judgeship on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. If confirmed by the Senate, Fisher, 59, would return to Los Angeles where he served as head of the Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners before becoming associate attorney general in November 1997.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1999 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
President Clinton on Monday nominated Raymond C. Fisher, the third-highest ranking official in the U.S. Justice Department and a longtime leader in the Los Angeles legal community, to a judgeship on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. If confirmed by the Senate, Fisher, 59, would return to Los Angeles where he served as head of the Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners before becoming associate attorney general in November 1997.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Sherman Oaks lawyer, former president of the Los Angeles Police Commission, was confirmed Thursday by the Senate to the No. 3 post in the U.S. Department of Justice. Raymond C. Fisher, a prominent civil liberties advocate, will serve as associate attorney general, overseeing much of the department's civil branch, including anti-trust, civil rights and tax divisions. Fisher, 57, is taking a leave of absence from his post as a senior litigation partner at Heller, Ehrman, White & McAuliffe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former president of the Los Angeles Police Commission was confirmed by the Senate on Thursday to the No. 3 post at the U.S. Department of Justice. Raymond C. Fisher, a prominent lawyer and civil liberties advocate in Southern California, will serve as associate attorney general, overseeing much of the department's civil branch, including anti-trust, civil rights and tax divisions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1996 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raymond C. Fisher, a prominent Los Angeles lawyer long involved in the city's police reform efforts, was elected president of the civilian Police Commission on Tuesday, a move hailed by reform advocates and Los Angeles Police Department insiders alike. Fisher, 57, joined the police panel in 1995, four years after serving as deputy general counsel to the Christopher Commission, the blue-ribbon panel that examined the LAPD after the Rodney G. King beating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former president of the Los Angeles Police Commission was confirmed by the Senate on Thursday to the No. 3 post at the U.S. Department of Justice. Raymond C. Fisher, a prominent lawyer and civil liberties advocate in Southern California, will serve as associate attorney general, overseeing much of the department's civil branch, including anti-trust, civil rights and tax divisions.
NEWS
June 13, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the Los Angeles Police Commission, one of two Los Angeles lawyers chosen Thursday to fill high Justice Department posts, said that he hopes to draw upon his experiences on the local board to give the federal government insights into the workings of police departments around the country. Raymond C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1997 | MATT LAIT and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles Police Commission President Raymond C. Fisher, an instrumental figure in reforming the Police Department, has been selected to fill a top job under U.S. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, sources familiar with the pending appointment confirmed Wednesday. Fisher, an influential commission member who spearheaded the panel's recent ouster of former Chief Willie L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1996 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Commission President Raymond C. Fisher, a respected civil rights advocate, on Friday endorsed relaxing restrictions on the LAPD's Anti-Terrorist Division and said he is confident that proposed changes will safeguard citizens from police abuse even as they give detectives greater latitude. "Any system can be abused," said Fisher, who heads the five-member civilian body that oversees LAPD policy. "But this system has some very thoughtful checks in it. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One grew up in a family of immigrant farm workers, made Phi Beta Kappa at UC Davis, worked on the California Law Review at UC's Boalt Hall and now is a partner in a prominent Downtown law firm. The other once clerked for a U.S. Supreme Court justice, serves on the boards of the Legal Aid Foundation and the Constitutional Rights Foundation, and played a key role in the Christopher Commission study that led to Police Department reforms in the wake of the 1991 Rodney G. King beating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Sherman Oaks lawyer, former president of the Los Angeles Police Commission, was confirmed Thursday by the Senate to the No. 3 post in the U.S. Department of Justice. Raymond C. Fisher, a prominent civil liberties advocate, will serve as associate attorney general, overseeing much of the department's civil branch, including anti-trust, civil rights and tax divisions. Fisher, 57, is taking a leave of absence from his post as a senior litigation partner at Heller, Ehrman, White & McAuliffe.
NEWS
June 13, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the Los Angeles Police Commission, one of two Los Angeles lawyers chosen Thursday to fill high Justice Department posts, said that he hopes to draw upon his experiences on the local board to give the federal government insights into the workings of police departments around the country. Raymond C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1997 | MATT LAIT and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles Police Commission President Raymond C. Fisher, an instrumental figure in reforming the Police Department, has been selected to fill a top job under U.S. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, sources familiar with the pending appointment confirmed Wednesday. Fisher, an influential commission member who spearheaded the panel's recent ouster of former Chief Willie L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1996 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Commission President Raymond C. Fisher, a respected civil rights advocate, on Friday endorsed relaxing restrictions on the LAPD's Anti-Terrorist Division and said he is confident that proposed changes will safeguard citizens from police abuse even as they give detectives greater latitude. "Any system can be abused," said Fisher, who heads the five-member civilian body that oversees LAPD policy. "But this system has some very thoughtful checks in it. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1996 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raymond C. Fisher, a prominent Los Angeles lawyer long involved in the city's police reform efforts, was elected president of the civilian Police Commission on Tuesday, a move hailed by reform advocates and Los Angeles Police Department insiders alike. Fisher, 57, joined the police panel in 1995, four years after serving as deputy general counsel to the Christopher Commission, the blue-ribbon panel that examined the LAPD after the Rodney G. King beating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One grew up in a family of immigrant farm workers, made Phi Beta Kappa at UC Davis, worked on the California Law Review at UC's Boalt Hall and now is a partner in a prominent Downtown law firm. The other once clerked for a U.S. Supreme Court justice, serves on the boards of the Legal Aid Foundation and the Constitutional Rights Foundation, and played a key role in the Christopher Commission study that led to Police Department reforms in the wake of the 1991 Rodney G. King beating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1996
Movie star Clint Eastwood ruined the career of his former girlfriend, actress Sondra Locke, by getting her a movie development deal in return for calling off a palimony suit, and then using his influence to block her from actually making any films, Locke's attorney contended Wednesday. "This deal with Warner Bros. was a sham.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2007 | Gale Holland
A federal appeals court Monday rejected a constitutional challenge to rent control in Santa Monica. A group of landlords had argued that eviction curbs adopted in 2002 were an "irrational response" to the city's housing difficulties and that the only legitimate policy would have been to limit rent ceilings to poor tenants. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S.
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