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Raymond Chandler

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OPINION
August 4, 2013
Re "Violence linked to climate change," Aug. 2 Who needs data when we have the truthiness of Raymond Chandler's beautiful writing from his novel "Red Wind": "There was a desert wind blowing that night. It was one of those hot dry Santa Anas that come down through the mountain passes and curl your hair and make your nerves jump and your skin itch. On nights like that every booze party ends in a fight. Meek little wives feel the edge of the carving knife and study their husbands' necks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Is it too much to compare Kem Nunn to Raymond Chandler? Both have used the loose frame of genre to write enduringly and resonantly about the dark side of the California dream. For Nunn, this has meant an exploration of boundaries, both actual and metaphorical; his last novel, "Tijuana Straits" (which won a 2005 Los Angeles Times Book Prize), traces the shifting landscape of the physical borderland. At the same time, there is also a willingness to take risks, to play against expectation, which marks both Nunn's fiction and his TV work on "John from Cincinnati" and now "Sons of Anarchy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
At the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Sunday, I got a chance to sit down with novelist and nonfiction writer Judith Freeman to discuss the lure of Southern California as a literary landscape, and also the influence of Raymond Chandler on the city and its cultural life. "When I moved here, one of the first writers that I started to read, through a friend of mine, was Raymond Chandler. And I thought, Wow, that's Los Angeles," Freeman said. "And I still think that he really got the city, he got underneath the city, he got everything about the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Kim Cooper is steeped in L.A. history. With her husband, she runs the cultural bus tour service Esotouric , which takes people to the curious and criminal places of Los Angeles' past. Some of their tours are specifically literary, following James M. Cain and Raymond Chandler through their lives in L.A. and the fictions they wrote here. Cooper, who has written books before (she helped her grandmother write "Fall in Love for Life" and is the author of the 33 1/3 book about Neutral Milk Hotel, "In the Aeroplane Over the Sea")
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1990 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
He's played music with a Go-Go and a Rolling Stone, but Jesse Sublett is making his reputation in the land of literature. His second mystery novel, "Tough Baby," published by Viking, hit bookstores in October, following last year's critically acclaimed debut effort, "Rock Critic Murders." Each spotlights Martin Fender, a musician, who, like Sublett, mixes careers. Fender also works for a collection agency.
NEWS
November 27, 1999 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Frank MacShane moved to Berkeley to teach at the University of California, a friend gave him a bit of advice. "If you want to know what California is like," he said, "read Raymond Chandler."
BOOKS
November 11, 1990 | Charles Solomon
When Raymond Chandler died in 1959, he left the first four chapters of this unfinished Philip Marlowe novel--which Robert Parker uses as a sort of prologue to his own novel, a so-so pastiche that has little to do with Chandler's style or characters. Although he tucks in references to Los Angeles streets like favors at a child's birthday party, Parker fails to convey any real sense of place--or time.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1989
The world premiere showing of a British documentary on detective writer Raymond Chandler, at 7 tonight at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, opens three days of films, talks and walks honoring the novelist. Actor Cliff Robertson will read selections of Chandler's hard-boiled prose before the screening of the untitled 1 1/2-hour television documentary made for the centennial of Chandler's birth in 1888 but never telecast.
NEWS
October 10, 1988 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles was founded by Spanish missionaries in the late 1700s. But some believe that the idea of Los Angeles was not crystallized until 150 years later, by a Chicago-born, English-bred detective writer--Raymond Chandler. This year, on the 100th anniversary of his birth, the literary world is paying tribute to Chandler, who so adeptly captured the fading physical splendor of his adopted home's canyons and flatlands while slicing through its social underbelly with sword-like similes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2007 | Graham Fuller, Special to The Times
Twenty years ago, Judith Freeman became "obsessed," as she puts it, with Raymond Chandler, whose novels featuring the private detective Philip Marlowe still make up the most iconic literary portrait of Los Angeles. When, in 2003, Freeman began writing "The Long Embrace: Raymond Chandler and the Woman He Loved," she found herself on a quest leading in many different directions. The author of a short-story collection and four novels, Freeman was raised in Utah.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler, the two masters of classic noir fiction, met just once. That was 78 years ago today, Jan. 11, 1936, in Los Angeles. The occasion was the first West Coast get-together for Black Mask Magazine. A photograph taken at the end of the meal shows 10 pulp writers gathered patiently around the end of a table. Chandler and Hammett are both standing: Chandler has the pipe. Hammett, the tallest, is at the far right. Of the 10, it was Hammett and Chandler whose work would become the most enduring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2013
Audrey Totter, 95, a blond leading lady of 1940s film noir who starred as a tough-talking dame in "Lady in the Lake," "The Set-Up" and "High Wall," died Thursday at West Hills Hospital, said her daughter, Mea Lane. Totter, a Woodland Hills resident, had a stroke and suffered from congestive heart failure. Although she had a relatively short film career, Totter created memorable movie moments while under contract with MGM from 1944 to the early '50s. A former radio actress, she had a small part in "The Postman Always Rings Twice," the 1946 movie based on James M. Cain's pulp novel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Back in the 1980s, before I moved to California, I had a brief flirtation with screenwriting. It started in college, after my best friend transferred to New York University's film school and began to make short movies; I would write the scripts (or drafts, anyway) and then we would relentlessly hone my scenes and exposition down to the bare bones language of screenplay form. By the end of the decade, my friend was in Los Angeles, where he'd sold a script. Eventually, we had the idea to collaborate on a kidnap caper called “The Grab,” inspired by our affinity for noir . But while the hard-boiled fiction we loved was often what one might charitably call plot-challenged -- a favorite anecdote involved William Faulkner and Leigh Brackett (who were adapting “The Big Sleep” for Howard Hawks)
OPINION
August 4, 2013
Re "Violence linked to climate change," Aug. 2 Who needs data when we have the truthiness of Raymond Chandler's beautiful writing from his novel "Red Wind": "There was a desert wind blowing that night. It was one of those hot dry Santa Anas that come down through the mountain passes and curl your hair and make your nerves jump and your skin itch. On nights like that every booze party ends in a fight. Meek little wives feel the edge of the carving knife and study their husbands' necks.
OPINION
August 4, 2013
Re "What next for Snowden?," Editorial, Aug. 2 It's a bit disingenuous to say about Edward Snowden that "those who engage in civil disobedience should be prepared to accept some legal consequences for their actions. " "Some legal consequences" could be taken by many to mean solitary confinement or multiple life sentences. In fact, the U.S. had to assure Russia that Snowden wouldn't be tortured or executed; given our country's treatment of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, it was an assurance that had to be made.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
The music that keyboardist Ray Manzarek made as part of the Doors helped define the 1960s, and also was a crucial part of the Southern California music scene in the latter half of that decade. Two generations of L.A. music met in the late 1970s when Manzarek connected with punk band X to produce the group's first four studio albums. The band's songwriters and lead singers, Exene Cervenka and bassist John Doe, reflect on the music of the Doors and their relationship with Manzarek, who died Monday at 74 of cancer.
NEWS
October 3, 1987 | SAM HALL KAPLAN, Times Design Critic
This is the season when the high-desert air, baked by the sun, becomes the Santa Ana winds that lash out across the city to the west, fanning fires, creating havoc and generally getting on everyone's nerves. For Los Angeles, it is the Mean Season, when during the day the air conditioner breaks down, the car overheats and the ice cream melts; and during the night the neighbors fight, the burglar alarm won't shut off and the cats won't shut up. Marlowe Sums Up L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Before her panel at the L.A. Times Festival of Book, journalist and author Amy Wilentz dropped in at our video booth to talk about how she came to write her latest book, "Farewell, Fred Voodoo. " Written after Haiti's devastating 2010 earthquake, this book, she explains wryly, "is about what happens when outsiders come to help you. " Wilentz's history of traveling to and writing about Haiti goes back more than 20 years, she tells L.A. Times staff writer Carolyn Kellogg. "I didn't want to go back," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
At the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Sunday, I got a chance to sit down with novelist and nonfiction writer Judith Freeman to discuss the lure of Southern California as a literary landscape, and also the influence of Raymond Chandler on the city and its cultural life. "When I moved here, one of the first writers that I started to read, through a friend of mine, was Raymond Chandler. And I thought, Wow, that's Los Angeles," Freeman said. "And I still think that he really got the city, he got underneath the city, he got everything about the city.
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