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Raymond De Felitta

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's as if you can hear Frank Sinatra crooning "My Way" in the background as "Two Family House" writer-director Raymond De Felitta discusses his circuitous route toward becoming a working filmmaker--a route that ended up being very personal. "There's no real way to break into Hollywood," De Felitta says. "They either chase you or you have to find other ways to do it."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
In spite of what the tabloidy typography in the title sequence might suggest, "Rob the Mob" skims over the lifted-from-the-headlines exploits of an outlaw couple and gleans a humanist drama steeped in sentimentality. Michael Pitt and Nina Arianda star as Tommy and Rosie Uva, real-life lovebirds who held up a series of mob social clubs in the early 1990s after learning from the John Gotti trial that the bling-adorned clientele was customarily unarmed. Director Raymond De Felitta, who, finally scoring a sleeper breakout in 2009 with "City Island," resumes painting New York in nostalgia in this film, much as he did in "Two Family House" (2000)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By John Horn
Even in the annals of dumb crooks, Tommy and Rosemarie Uva weren't the sharpest tools in the shed. In the early 1990s, the young Queens couple decided to stick up Mafia social clubs. In the abstract, the choice of location made sense. The clubs were filled with guys with fat wallets and even chunkier jewelry, and they didn't carry guns for fear of government raids and were not likely to call the police for help. But their plan had one obvious and ultimately fatal flaw: The Uvas were, after all, stealing from the Gambino and Colombo crime families.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By John Horn
Even in the annals of dumb crooks, Tommy and Rosemarie Uva weren't the sharpest tools in the shed. In the early 1990s, the young Queens couple decided to stick up Mafia social clubs. In the abstract, the choice of location made sense. The clubs were filled with guys with fat wallets and even chunkier jewelry, and they didn't carry guns for fear of government raids and were not likely to call the police for help. But their plan had one obvious and ultimately fatal flaw: The Uvas were, after all, stealing from the Gambino and Colombo crime families.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A powerful, personal portrait of history's unfolding and its effect on the future, the documentary "Booker's Place: A Mississippi Story" is in equal measure a look at two families, the ongoing legacy of America's recent past and an essay on one man's moment of transformative courage. Director Raymond De Felitta (his last fiction feature was"City Island") does a noteworthy job of allowing those separate topics to feel distinct and give each equal consideration. In 1965, De Felitta's father Frank traveled to Greenwood, Miss., to make a documentary for NBC News.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
In spite of what the tabloidy typography in the title sequence might suggest, "Rob the Mob" skims over the lifted-from-the-headlines exploits of an outlaw couple and gleans a humanist drama steeped in sentimentality. Michael Pitt and Nina Arianda star as Tommy and Rosie Uva, real-life lovebirds who held up a series of mob social clubs in the early 1990s after learning from the John Gotti trial that the bling-adorned clientele was customarily unarmed. Director Raymond De Felitta, who, finally scoring a sleeper breakout in 2009 with "City Island," resumes painting New York in nostalgia in this film, much as he did in "Two Family House" (2000)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2000
In the article "Dreaming of Staten Island" (by Richard Natale, Oct. 7), filmmaker Raymond De Felitta was the latest person The Times has described as "half-Jewish." Aren't you going to quantify and disclose the rest of De Felitta's religious heritage? Is he one-quarter Presbyterian? Three-eighths Wiccan? Stop using this inaccurate and inappropriate term. One either is Jewish or is not. G.L. KRAUSS Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Sweet but dramatically inert, "The Thing About My Folks" is writer-star Paul Reiser's seriocomic valentine to his parents. While stocked with simple, earnest observations on love, relationships and family, the film's haphazard plotting and often discordant tone keep it from being anything more than an episodic collection of sentimental aphorisms.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2004
"Coach Carter," based on the experiences of a high school basketball coach who led a team of disadvantaged teens from zero to heroes, will raise the curtain on this year's Palm Springs International Film Festival. The festival, which will run Jan. 6 to 16, boasts several Oscar contenders in the foreign language and documentary categories, as well as some movies that have not yet played in theaters. "Coach Carter" stars Samuel L.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2010 | By Glenn Whipp
Raymond De Felitta's screwball farce " City Island" introduces us to the Rizzos, a boisterous party of four living in the tradition-steeped, seaside spit of Bronx real estate of the movie's title. The Rizzos don't talk to each other much and when they do, the neighbors undoubtedly hear every word. But deep down, we're meant to understand, they shout because they care. The Rizzos also harbor secrets. Corrections officer Vince ( Andy Garcia) tells wife Joyce ( Julianna Margulies) that he's out playing poker when he's really taking acting classes in Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A powerful, personal portrait of history's unfolding and its effect on the future, the documentary "Booker's Place: A Mississippi Story" is in equal measure a look at two families, the ongoing legacy of America's recent past and an essay on one man's moment of transformative courage. Director Raymond De Felitta (his last fiction feature was"City Island") does a noteworthy job of allowing those separate topics to feel distinct and give each equal consideration. In 1965, De Felitta's father Frank traveled to Greenwood, Miss., to make a documentary for NBC News.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's as if you can hear Frank Sinatra crooning "My Way" in the background as "Two Family House" writer-director Raymond De Felitta discusses his circuitous route toward becoming a working filmmaker--a route that ended up being very personal. "There's no real way to break into Hollywood," De Felitta says. "They either chase you or you have to find other ways to do it."
NEWS
June 16, 2010
Whether doing drama or comedy, Julianna Margulies always seems to leave a lasting impression. Here's a look at some of her credits: "ER," NBC (1994-2000): As stormy-natured nurse Carol Hathaway, she nearly overdosed in the pilot episode over her failed romance with Dr. Doug Ross (George Clooney). The pair's tumultuous relationship captivated viewers for six seasons before they exited Chicago's County General (and the show), ostensibly to raise twins together in Seattle. Margulies won an Emmy the first season and was nominated again each year until she left.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raymond De Felitta's "Two Family House" is as fragile as a soap bubble--one falsemove and it bursts. That it never does only adds to its abundant pleasures, its rich, rueful humor, poignancy and tenderness. Sharp judgments are demanded of De Felitta, acclaimed for his "Bronx Cheers" and "Cafe Society," every step of the way. He avoids the crippling effect of self-consciousness through the sheer dint of his love for an enclave of Italian Americans living on Staten Island in 1956.
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