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October 7, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's as if you can hear Frank Sinatra crooning "My Way" in the background as "Two Family House" writer-director Raymond De Felitta discusses his circuitous route toward becoming a working filmmaker--a route that ended up being very personal. "There's no real way to break into Hollywood," De Felitta says. "They either chase you or you have to find other ways to do it."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A powerful, personal portrait of history's unfolding and its effect on the future, the documentary "Booker's Place: A Mississippi Story" is in equal measure a look at two families, the ongoing legacy of America's recent past and an essay on one man's moment of transformative courage. Director Raymond De Felitta (his last fiction feature was"City Island") does a noteworthy job of allowing those separate topics to feel distinct and give each equal consideration. In 1965, De Felitta's father Frank traveled to Greenwood, Miss., to make a documentary for NBC News.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A powerful, personal portrait of history's unfolding and its effect on the future, the documentary "Booker's Place: A Mississippi Story" is in equal measure a look at two families, the ongoing legacy of America's recent past and an essay on one man's moment of transformative courage. Director Raymond De Felitta (his last fiction feature was"City Island") does a noteworthy job of allowing those separate topics to feel distinct and give each equal consideration. In 1965, De Felitta's father Frank traveled to Greenwood, Miss., to make a documentary for NBC News.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's as if you can hear Frank Sinatra crooning "My Way" in the background as "Two Family House" writer-director Raymond De Felitta discusses his circuitous route toward becoming a working filmmaker--a route that ended up being very personal. "There's no real way to break into Hollywood," De Felitta says. "They either chase you or you have to find other ways to do it."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2000
In the article "Dreaming of Staten Island" (by Richard Natale, Oct. 7), filmmaker Raymond De Felitta was the latest person The Times has described as "half-Jewish." Aren't you going to quantify and disclose the rest of De Felitta's religious heritage? Is he one-quarter Presbyterian? Three-eighths Wiccan? Stop using this inaccurate and inappropriate term. One either is Jewish or is not. G.L. KRAUSS Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Sweet but dramatically inert, "The Thing About My Folks" is writer-star Paul Reiser's seriocomic valentine to his parents. While stocked with simple, earnest observations on love, relationships and family, the film's haphazard plotting and often discordant tone keep it from being anything more than an episodic collection of sentimental aphorisms.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2004
"Coach Carter," based on the experiences of a high school basketball coach who led a team of disadvantaged teens from zero to heroes, will raise the curtain on this year's Palm Springs International Film Festival. The festival, which will run Jan. 6 to 16, boasts several Oscar contenders in the foreign language and documentary categories, as well as some movies that have not yet played in theaters. "Coach Carter" stars Samuel L.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Times Staff Writers
The 2014 winter-spring movie preview is a broad overview of films opening through late April. Release dates and other details, as compiled by Oliver Gettell, are subject to change. FOR THE RECORD: Movie previews: A listing in the Jan. 12 Sunday Calendar Movie Sneaks section for the film "G.B.F. " had the names of the writer and director reversed. The writer of the teen comedy opening this weekend is George Northy, and the director is Darren Stein. - Jan. 17 Back in the Day An aspiring actor best known for his insurance commercials heads home to Indiana for his high school reunion and reconnects with his now-married friends and an old flame.
NEWS
June 16, 2010
Whether doing drama or comedy, Julianna Margulies always seems to leave a lasting impression. Here's a look at some of her credits: "ER," NBC (1994-2000): As stormy-natured nurse Carol Hathaway, she nearly overdosed in the pilot episode over her failed romance with Dr. Doug Ross (George Clooney). The pair's tumultuous relationship captivated viewers for six seasons before they exited Chicago's County General (and the show), ostensibly to raise twins together in Seattle. Margulies won an Emmy the first season and was nominated again each year until she left.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2010 | By Glenn Whipp
Raymond De Felitta's screwball farce " City Island" introduces us to the Rizzos, a boisterous party of four living in the tradition-steeped, seaside spit of Bronx real estate of the movie's title. The Rizzos don't talk to each other much and when they do, the neighbors undoubtedly hear every word. But deep down, we're meant to understand, they shout because they care. The Rizzos also harbor secrets. Corrections officer Vince ( Andy Garcia) tells wife Joyce ( Julianna Margulies) that he's out playing poker when he's really taking acting classes in Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raymond De Felitta's "Two Family House" is as fragile as a soap bubble--one falsemove and it bursts. That it never does only adds to its abundant pleasures, its rich, rueful humor, poignancy and tenderness. Sharp judgments are demanded of De Felitta, acclaimed for his "Bronx Cheers" and "Cafe Society," every step of the way. He avoids the crippling effect of self-consciousness through the sheer dint of his love for an enclave of Italian Americans living on Staten Island in 1956.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2008 | Sam Adams; Kevin Thomas; Gary Goldstein
Rappers bank millions, DJs pack clubs and graffiti artists hang in galleries. But break dancing, the fourth pillar of hip-hop, came and went as a passing fad. Not so fast, says Benson Lee, whose documentary "Planet B-Boy" shows that breaking is alive and thrillingly well all over the globe. The nexus has shifted from the housing projects of the Bronx to the sleepy town of Braunschweig, Germany, where crews from Estonia and South Africa converge to compete in the Battle of the Year.
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