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Raymond J Donovan

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NEWS
May 17, 1987
The prosecutor in the grand larceny and fraud trial of former U.S. Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan repeated his charge that Donovan changed his position in sworn statements to cover up his role in a scheme to defraud the New York City Transit Authority. In closing arguments, Stephen R.
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NEWS
October 31, 1987 | Associated Press
Former Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan has been cleared in a secret probe into allegations that he may have lied when he denied knowing anything about an alleged $15,000 kickback scheme involving Donovan and his construction company, according to a report issued Friday. One of the alleged kickbacks was a $5,000 contribution solicited by Donovan for the New Jersey gubernatorial campaign of Raymond Bateman, according to a report by independent counsel Leon A.
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NEWS
May 21, 1987
A judge turned over to jurors the case of former Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan, the first sitting Cabinet member ever indicted, and seven others accused in a $7.4-million fraud scheme. New York state Supreme Court Justice John Collins, in a 1 1/2-hour charge to the jury, which will begin deliberations today, told the panel "your responsibility is to render a true verdict. . . . Justice demands that the innocent be protected and the guilty be convicted."
NEWS
May 27, 1987 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
He returned home to champagne and balloons, laughter and tears, but former U.S. Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan said Tuesday that he remains "bitter" after his acquittal on grand larceny and fraud charges and is anxious to change the grand jury system. "We've been terribly abused by the system," Donovan told The Times in his first interview since the jury verdict late Monday afternoon. "The jury gave us freedom, but the system denied us justice.
NEWS
October 31, 1987 | Associated Press
Former Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan has been cleared in a secret probe into allegations that he may have lied when he denied knowing anything about an alleged $15,000 kickback scheme involving Donovan and his construction company, according to a report issued Friday. One of the alleged kickbacks was a $5,000 contribution solicited by Donovan for the New Jersey gubernatorial campaign of Raymond Bateman, according to a report by independent counsel Leon A.
NEWS
May 1, 1987 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
Closing arguments began Thursday in the seven-month-long grand larceny and fraud trial of former U.S. Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan with a defense lawyer charging the case was "like a loony tune, like a circus." Theodore V. Wells, lead defense counsel for the 10 defendants, said Stephen Bookin, Bronx assistant district attorney, had used a "different perspective, a twisted perspective" to allege a crime when no law had been broken.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
The state prosecutor in former U.S. Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan's $7.4-million grand larceny and fraud trial began his closing argument Wednesday by blasting defense lawyers for "name-calling and throwing mud at the prosecutor." Stephen R. Bookin, assistant district attorney in the Bronx, told the 12-member jury that defense lawyers had directed attacks "at me, personally" to divert attention from the prosecution evidence presented during seven months of testimony.
NEWS
May 24, 1987 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
After a bitter courtroom confrontation, a judge Saturday ordered an alternate juror seated and deliberations to begin again in the marathon larceny and fraud trial of former Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan. "The people and the defendants have a right to a verdict," state Supreme Court Justice John P. Collins said after finding "ambiguous" a section of New York trial law prohibiting the substitution of jurors without the permission of defendants after a jury has started its deliberations.
NEWS
April 10, 1987 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
After seven grueling months of trial, Raymond J. Donovan's lawyer pleaded with a New York state judge Thursday to dismiss all larceny and fraud charges against the former U.S. labor secretary before the case goes to the jury. Donovan's lawyer, William O. Bittman, said prosecutors had "invented evidence" but had failed to prove any of the 137 counts charged in the September, 1984, indictment against Donovan and his eight co-defendants.
NEWS
May 27, 1987 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
He returned home to champagne and balloons, laughter and tears, but former U.S. Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan said Tuesday that he remains "bitter" after his acquittal on grand larceny and fraud charges and is anxious to change the grand jury system. "We've been terribly abused by the system," Donovan told The Times in his first interview since the jury verdict late Monday afternoon. "The jury gave us freedom, but the system denied us justice.
NEWS
May 26, 1987 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
Former Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan, the nation's first Cabinet officer indicted in office, was found not guilty Monday of all grand larceny and fraud charges after an eight-month trial in state court. The jury, which deliberated for 9 1/2 hours, also found his seven co-defendants innocent of all charges stemming from a subway construction contract. Donovan stood with arms folded as the jury's foreman read the verdict.
NEWS
May 24, 1987 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
After a bitter courtroom confrontation, a judge Saturday ordered an alternate juror seated and deliberations to begin again in the marathon larceny and fraud trial of former Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan. "The people and the defendants have a right to a verdict," state Supreme Court Justice John P. Collins said after finding "ambiguous" a section of New York trial law prohibiting the substitution of jurors without the permission of defendants after a jury has started its deliberations.
NEWS
May 23, 1987 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
The eight-month-long larceny and fraud trial of former Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan was thrown into chaos Friday after a juror's emotional outbursts forced the judge to remove her from the jury in the midst of its deliberations. Defense lawyers immediately demanded a mistrial. After the psalm-chanting woman juror was examined by a psychiatrist, state Supreme Court Justice John Collins ruled that she was "grossly unfit" to serve and sent her home to her family.
NEWS
May 22, 1987
The New York jury considering fraud and larceny charges against former Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan reheard the definition of grand larceny and asked to see key evidence in the case. Shortly after it began deliberations, the state Supreme Court jury asked for documents and testimony about the subway construction subcontract at the heart of the case. Donovan and seven co-defendants are accused of stealing $7.
NEWS
May 21, 1987
A judge turned over to jurors the case of former Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan, the first sitting Cabinet member ever indicted, and seven others accused in a $7.4-million fraud scheme. New York state Supreme Court Justice John Collins, in a 1 1/2-hour charge to the jury, which will begin deliberations today, told the panel "your responsibility is to render a true verdict. . . . Justice demands that the innocent be protected and the guilty be convicted."
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
The state prosecutor in former U.S. Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan's $7.4-million grand larceny and fraud trial began his closing argument Wednesday by blasting defense lawyers for "name-calling and throwing mud at the prosecutor." Stephen R. Bookin, assistant district attorney in the Bronx, told the 12-member jury that defense lawyers had directed attacks "at me, personally" to divert attention from the prosecution evidence presented during seven months of testimony.
NEWS
May 1, 1987 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
Closing arguments began Thursday in the seven-month-long grand larceny and fraud trial of former U.S. Labor Secretary Raymond J. Donovan with a defense lawyer charging the case was "like a loony tune, like a circus." Theodore V. Wells, lead defense counsel for the 10 defendants, said Stephen Bookin, Bronx assistant district attorney, had used a "different perspective, a twisted perspective" to allege a crime when no law had been broken.
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