Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRaymond J Patriarca
IN THE NEWS

Raymond J Patriarca

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
A secretly recorded tape of an alleged Mafia induction ceremony can be used as evidence against purported crime boss Raymond J. Patriarca and six of his lieutenants, a federal judge ruled Tuesday. The tape is the first of an alleged mob initiation. On it, a convicted killer and three other men are heard allegedly swearing allegiance to the Mafia with blood drawn from their trigger fingers and pledging to murder any person who could pose a threat, including their own relatives. U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge in Boston ruled that reputed crime boss Raymond (Junior) Patriarca may be released on bail while he awaits his federal racketeering trial in September, but he must be under virtual house arrest. U.S. District Judge Mark L. Wolf granted a motion filed by attorneys for Patriarca, who has been in custody since March, 1990. He will be required to wear an electronic bracelet at his Lincoln, R. I., home that allows authorities to check on his whereabouts.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge in Boston ruled that reputed crime boss Raymond (Junior) Patriarca may be released on bail while he awaits his federal racketeering trial in September, but he must be under virtual house arrest. U.S. District Judge Mark L. Wolf granted a motion filed by attorneys for Patriarca, who has been in custody since March, 1990. He will be required to wear an electronic bracelet at his Lincoln, R. I., home that allows authorities to check on his whereabouts.
NEWS
April 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
A secretly recorded tape of an alleged Mafia induction ceremony can be used as evidence against purported crime boss Raymond J. Patriarca and six of his lieutenants, a federal judge ruled Tuesday. The tape is the first of an alleged mob initiation. On it, a convicted killer and three other men are heard allegedly swearing allegiance to the Mafia with blood drawn from their trigger fingers and pledging to murder any person who could pose a threat, including their own relatives. U.S.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FBI agents began arresting 21 alleged mobsters Monday after Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh announced three indictments naming "virtually the entire active leadership and membership" of the New England Mafia. By Monday afternoon, 15 of the 21 members of the Patriarca Family were in custody.
NEWS
August 9, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Patriarca crime family's reputed boss and seven underlings were convicted Thursday of racketeering in a trial that provided a glimpse into the Mafia, including a secretly recorded mob induction ceremony. "These defendants, out of their own mouths, convicted themselves," Assistant U.S. Atty. John Durham said. Authorities boasted that the convictions of reputed Patriarca boss Nicholas L. Bianco and seven associates signaled the death knell of the Providence, R. I.-based organization.
NEWS
March 20, 1986 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge's ruling this week charging the Providence Journal with criminal contempt of court has raised First Amendment questions that attorneys believe could end up in the Supreme Court. U.S. District Judge Francis J. Boyle ruled Tuesday that the newspaper and its editor were guilty of contempt when they defied his restraining order last Nov. 14 and published a story about Raymond J. Patriarca, a reputed Mafia figure in New England. Judge Boyle rescinded the restraining order on Nov.
NEWS
May 3, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court on Monday sidestepped ruling on whether a federal judge may stop a newspaper from publishing legally obtained information and instead dismissed on jurisdictional grounds an appeal from an attorney appointed to represent the federal government. The high court move spares the Providence, R.I., Journal and its executive editor, Charles M. Hauser, from further legal action growing out of a 1985 article reporting 20-year-old FBI wiretaps on a reputed crime boss, Raymond J.
NEWS
May 8, 1988 | ALAN FLIPPEN, Associated Press
The Woonasquatucket, Moshassuck and Providence Rivers, long buried beneath railroad yards, a post office and the world's widest bridge, are being exhumed in a $40-million waterfront renewal that planners hope will give the entire city a lift. The reshaping that began last week will propel Providence into the 21st Century by reviving many features of the 19th, city officials say. "We're building on our dreams of the past," said Mayor Joseph R. Paolino Jr.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
William J. McCarthy, the newly chosen president of the Teamsters Union, said in a 1984 conversation that he needed permission from a reputed New England Mafia boss before he could take a higher post at the labor organization, according to a secret FBI memorandum. In the conversation, with then-Teamsters President Jackie Presser, McCarthy was allegedly seeking Presser's support to become general secretary-treasurer of the union, according to the internal FBI memo.
MAGAZINE
February 21, 1993 | Paul Lieberman, Times staff writer Paul Lieberman has reported frequently on organized crime, most recently describing efforts to infiltrate Indian gambling.
As a child, Linda Carol fantasized about the people she saw on TV. Growing up south of Boston in a family in which screaming matches were dinner-time fare, she retreated time and again to the tube. "I thought I'd like to go inside there," she says, "and get away from my own life." * At 14, she found a better escape--beauty pageants.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The oath, uttered in Italian by would-be members of La Cosa Nostra, was terse--and stark: "I swear not to divulge this secret and to obey, with love and omerta"-- the Code of Silence. Then, in a centuries-old ritual, each inductee's trigger-finger was cut enough to draw blood. A holy card of the saint of the controlling family was burned and the men intoned the second part of the oath--again, in Italian: "As burns this saint, so will burn my soul.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|