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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES
The Pacific Symphony has named Raymond Kobler its new concertmaster, effective today. He succeeds Kevin Connolly, who resigned in October after only one season. Kobler, 53, has served as guest concertmaster for most of the Pacific's concerts since February. He was concertmaster of the San Francisco Symphony from 1980 to 1998 and associate concertmaster of the Cleveland Orchestra from 1974 to '80. Since 1991, Kobler has been concertmaster of the Sun Valley Symphony in Idaho.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2000 | JACK ROBINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his local recital debut Wednesday, the Pacific Symphony's concertmaster distinguished himself with a smart and muscular performance of works challenging not only for the violin but for the Irvine Barclay Theatre audience as well. Raymond Kobler, who joined the orchestra last season after 18 years in the same post with the San Francisco Symphony, tore through a mountain of great music before a nearly full house.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If not for the timely arrival of a key musical mentor almost 40 years ago, Raymond Kobler probably wouldn't be on stage tonight as the Pacific Symphony's new concertmaster. Though he started violin lessons at 7, Kobler, like many others his age, lost interest for a while in his teens and gave up the instrument. "I was more interested in playing sports and stuff," Kobler, 54, said by phone this week from his home in San Francisco. But after his family moved from New York to Orange, N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If not for the timely arrival of a key musical mentor almost 40 years ago, Raymond Kobler probably wouldn't be on stage tonight as the Pacific Symphony's new concertmaster. Though he started violin lessons at 7, Kobler, like many others his age, lost interest for a while in his teens and gave up the instrument. "I was more interested in playing sports and stuff," Kobler, 54, said by phone this week from his home in San Francisco. But after his family moved from New York to Orange, N.J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2000 | JACK ROBINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his local recital debut Wednesday, the Pacific Symphony's concertmaster distinguished himself with a smart and muscular performance of works challenging not only for the violin but for the Irvine Barclay Theatre audience as well. Raymond Kobler, who joined the orchestra last season after 18 years in the same post with the San Francisco Symphony, tore through a mountain of great music before a nearly full house.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN
Guest conductor and violin soloist Jean-Jacques Kantorow will not perform Wednesday and Thursday in the Pacific Symphony's "Mostly Mozart" Classic Series. Instead, guest conductor Michael Stern will lead the orchestra through a program that includes works by Mozart and Tchaikovsky. Concertmaster Raymond Kobler will perform the violin solos. Information: (714) 755-5788.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2000
Raymond Kobler, concertmaster of the Pacific Symphony, will give a recital with pianist Jon Nakamatsu at the Irvine Barclay Theatre in Irvine at 8 p.m. Wednesday. Together, the musicians will be heard in the Partita by Witold Lutoslawski, Beethoven's "Kreutzer" Sonata and the Sonata No. 1 by Saint-Saens. Alone, Kobler will play the Solo Sonata No. 3 ("Ballade") by Eugene Ysaye. Information: (714) 755-5799.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2003 | Daniel Cariaga, Times Staff Writer
Carl St.Clair and the Pacific Symphony paid appropriate homage to Tchaikovsky on the occasion of the composer's 163rd birthday Wednesday with a raucous performance of a suite from "Swan Lake" to close this week's program. It may have lacked complete transparency, and reached over-the-top heights, but it rang authoritatively through Segerstrom Hall at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. St.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though neither wrote conventionally sentimental religious music and both composed in vastly different styles, Stravinsky and Faure each wrote masterworks that address human needs at times of religious and personal crisis. They might, however, be surprised to find themselves on the same program, as they were Wednesday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center when Carl St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A weeklong festival devoted to the beloved American composer Aaron Copland and the West Coast premiere of Richard Danielpour's "Voices of Remembrance"--a memorial to three slain national leaders--will highlight the Pacific Symphony's 2000-01 season. Music director Carl St.Clair will conduct Copland's "Fanfare for the Common Man" and "Lincoln Portrait," among other works, as part of a festival of films, lectures and concerts honoring the Copland centenary Nov. 12-19. Details will be announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES
The Pacific Symphony has named Raymond Kobler its new concertmaster, effective today. He succeeds Kevin Connolly, who resigned in October after only one season. Kobler, 53, has served as guest concertmaster for most of the Pacific's concerts since February. He was concertmaster of the San Francisco Symphony from 1980 to 1998 and associate concertmaster of the Cleveland Orchestra from 1974 to '80. Since 1991, Kobler has been concertmaster of the Sun Valley Symphony in Idaho.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2002 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roberto Minczuk's tight control over the Pacific Symphony on Wednesday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center could have been a prescription for tedium for the audience and frustration for the musicians--except for two things. The 34-year-old Brazilian conductor had so many ideas that the music unfolded in consistently vivid and interesting ways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2001 | CHRIS PASLES
Long before appearing in public, musicians spend thousands of hours taking lessons and practicing alone to perfect their art. Even when they become professionals, they continue this isolated but necessary work. More hours go into group rehearsals, when the instrumentalists finally come together to prepare for an audience, as members of the Pacific Symphony did this week for two programs at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa.
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