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Raymond L Johnson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1988
Attorney Raymond L. Johnson Jr., who has headed the 10,000-member Los Angeles branch of the NAACP for the past 3 1/2 years, will resign at the end of the month. He and his family will move to Birmingham, Ala., where he will continue his law practice, NAACP officials said. Under Johnson's leadership, the group has helped develop economic opportunities, gang prevention and health programs for the black community.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Raymond L. Johnson Sr., an attorney, civil rights activist and former Tuskegee Airman, died Dec. 31 in Los Angeles of complications of pneumonia and heart failure, said his wife, Evelyn. He was 89. Johnson, who practiced law for nearly 50 years, was a leader of the Los Angeles chapter of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People in the 1960s and 1970s. After the 1965 Watts riots, he provided free legal assistance to African Americans who were wrongfully arrested during the disturbances.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Raymond L. Johnson Sr., an attorney, civil rights activist and former Tuskegee Airman, died Dec. 31 in Los Angeles of complications of pneumonia and heart failure, said his wife, Evelyn. He was 89. Johnson, who practiced law for nearly 50 years, was a leader of the Los Angeles chapter of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People in the 1960s and 1970s. After the 1965 Watts riots, he provided free legal assistance to African Americans who were wrongfully arrested during the disturbances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1988
Attorney Raymond L. Johnson Jr., who has headed the 10,000-member Los Angeles branch of the NAACP for the past 3 1/2 years, will resign at the end of the month. He and his family will move to Birmingham, Ala., where he will continue his law practice, NAACP officials said. Under Johnson's leadership, the group has helped develop economic opportunities, gang prevention and health programs for the black community.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Frank Sinatra will receive the NAACP's 1987 Life Achievement Award for his efforts to combat racial prejudice in the United States for a half-century, the association said Friday. The National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People will present the award April 1 at the organization's annual dinner. "We are honoring Mr. Sinatra in recognition of his outstanding efforts to combat race prejudice in the United States for more than 50 years," said Raymond L. Johnson Jr.
NEWS
May 5, 1986
Deputy Chief Raymond L. Johnson, Los Angeles' highest-ranking California Highway Patrol officer, is quitting his post to become the police chief of Inglewood. A 21-year CHP veteran, Johnson, 50, will take over his new job on June 2. He succeeds Joseph T. Rouzan, who retired in January to become a security consultant at Los Angeles International Airport.
NEWS
April 5, 1985
Tougher state legislation to combat the gang and drug problems in Los Angeles was called for Thursday by the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People.
OPINION
February 16, 1986
Your article (Jan. 28), "Blacks Not Expected to Fault Mayor's Court Stand," may have left some readers with the impression that an official of the Los Angeles National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People was soliciting support for the retention of several justices on the California Supreme Court. That impression was totally incorrect. Although the spokesperson in the article is an officer of the NAACP, her remarks were her own and were not made on behalf of the NAACP. The NAACP is prohibited by its constitution from supporting any candidate for a public office.
NEWS
November 6, 1986
James Butts, who headed the police department's narcotics task force that helped halt drug trafficking in the Dixon-Darby and Lockhaven neighborhoods, was sworn in as captain of operations Wednesday, marking the first time a black officer has been appointed to that rank in a South Bay police department, according to area police officials.
NEWS
November 9, 1986
James Butts, who headed the Inglewood Police Department's narcotics task force that helped halt drug trafficking in the Dixon-Darby and Lockhaven neighborhoods, has been sworn in as captain of operations, marking the first time a black officer has been appointed to that rank in Inglewood. Butts, who at 33 is also the youngest officer to be named a captain in Inglewood, will head a 124-member staff that includes the patrol and traffic enforcement divisions. Police Chief Raymond L.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1990
As a black attorney with a deep concern and commitment regarding black enterprise, I read with interest the June 26 article, "Black Entrepreneurs: Lost in the Crowd?" In 1965, I was a founder and vice president of the Los Angeles Area Economic Development Agency, a nonprofit corporation established to promote small businesses in Los Angeles County among blacks, minorities and the underprivileged. When this federal program was terminated in 1968, only four of the 100 small businesses initiated had failed.
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