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Raymond Lee

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May 5, 1989 | BARBARA FOLEY, Foley is a free-lance writer who lives in Beverly Hills.
Raymond Lee walks into Cucina, the Melrose Avenue restaurant, and people stop talking. They're stunned by the visual impact. He is over 6 feet tall, which is not typical for a native of China. Beyond that, his outfit is arresting: velvet-collared sport shirt, waist-trimming jacket, and a scarf tied around his head. It's part "The Last Emperor" elegance, part New York sophistication, part Los Angeles eccentricity. It's also a good example of what makes Lee something of a celebrity, starting in fashion circles and rippling beyond.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2009 | By Jack Leonard
A former security guard accused of fatally shooting an 18-year-old college student in a Palmdale parking lot nearly a decade ago was convicted of murder Friday, authorities said. The verdict caps a lengthy legal saga that began when Raymond Lee Jennings first reported finding Michelle O'Keefe's body during a routine patrol of the park-and-ride lot. Investigators found the victim, a student at Antelope Valley College, slumped in the front seat of her Ford Mustang. She had been shot four times in the chest and face.
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BUSINESS
May 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two U.S. Citizens Sentenced in Bank Swindle: The Americans, convicted of trying to swindle $10 billion from a Chinese bank, lost their appeals and were sentenced to prison terms of 14 and 20 years. It was one of the most serious swindles ever attempted against a Chinese bank, and consequently the sentences were among the heaviest handed down in China against U.S. citizens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2009 | David Kelly
Raymond Lee Oyler, the Beaumont mechanic convicted of setting the 2006 Esperanza fire that killed five firefighters, was sentenced to death Friday by a judge who said the serial arsonist had set out to "create havoc." "He became more and more proficient," said Riverside County Superior Court Judge W. Charles Morgan. "He knew young men and women would put their lives on the line to protect people and property, yet he continued anyway."
MAGAZINE
June 25, 1989 | BARBARA FOLEY, Barbara Foley, former West Coast fashion editor of Women's Wear Daily and W, is a free-lance fashion writer
MODERN Objects was a small, 2-year-old art gallery on the unhip eastern stretch of Melrose Avenue when entrepreneur Mario Tamayo decided last October to team up with men's fashion designer Jef Huereque and transform the gallery into a clothing store. They both wanted an unpredictable, hip but homey kind of place. "We love color, we love all kinds of people and elements working together, and we love humor," begins Tamayo, 31, who also owns Cha Cha Cha and Cafe Mambo, a couple of high-energy Caribbean restaurants in the same East Hollywood neighborhood as Modern Objects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2009 | David Kelly
Raymond Lee Oyler, the Beaumont mechanic convicted of setting the 2006 Esperanza fire that killed five firefighters, was sentenced to death Friday by a judge who said the serial arsonist had set out to "create havoc." "He became more and more proficient," said Riverside County Superior Court Judge W. Charles Morgan. "He knew young men and women would put their lives on the line to protect people and property, yet he continued anyway."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2006 | Maeve Reston, Times Staff Writer
The incendiary device allegedly used to set the deadly wildfire that killed five firefighters in Riverside County three weeks ago was similar to devices used to set two earlier fires linked to suspected arsonist Raymond Lee Oyler, a court affidavit alleges. In all three fires, the arsonist set the blaze in the San Gorgonio Pass area by placing six or seven wooden matches atop a lighted cigarette, according to the court document.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2009 | David Kelly
After barely a day of deliberation, a Riverside County jury on Wednesday returned a verdict of death for Raymond Lee Oyler for starting the 2006 Esperanza fire in the foothills of the San Jacinto Mountains that killed five firefighters, destroyed 34 homes and charred more than 41,000 acres. Firefighters and the families of the victims hailed the decision and said it offered a measure of justice for a crime they said had torn a hole in the fabric of their lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2009 | David Kelly
After more than a month of testimony, the trial of Raymond Lee Oyler ended Thursday with the prosecution describing the Beaumont mechanic as a murderer who set a killer wildfire for his own amusement and to satisfy a lust for power. The defense conceded that Oyler set 11 fires, just not the 2006 Esperanza fire that killed five firefighters. "Those five men were killed by a man who taught himself to use fire as a weapon," said Riverside County Deputy Dist. Atty. Michael Hestrin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2009 | David Kelly
Raymond Lee Oyler, who is charged with setting the October 2006 Esperanza fire that killed five firefighters, was a serial arsonist whose girlfriend once gave him an ultimatum to stop setting fires or she would leave him, prosecutors said Thursday. In opening statements at Oyler's trial, Riverside County Deputy Dist. Atty. Michael Hestrin told jurors that the 38-year-old auto mechanic had set more than 20 fires in the San Gorgonio Pass area in the months before the fatal blaze.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2009 | David Kelly
After barely a day of deliberation, a Riverside County jury on Wednesday returned a verdict of death for Raymond Lee Oyler for starting the 2006 Esperanza fire in the foothills of the San Jacinto Mountains that killed five firefighters, destroyed 34 homes and charred more than 41,000 acres. Firefighters and the families of the victims hailed the decision and said it offered a measure of justice for a crime they said had torn a hole in the fabric of their lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2009 | Jack Leonard
A Los Angeles judge ruled Monday that prosecutors can move forward with a third trial of a former security guard charged with fatally shooting an 18-year-old college student at a Palmdale park-and-ride nine years ago. Two juries have failed to reach a unanimous verdict in the case against Raymond Lee Jennings, with the most recent panel deadlocking last month 11 to 1 in favor of guilt. Last year, another jury was hung 9 to 3 in favor of a conviction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2009 | David Kelly
After more than a month of testimony, the trial of Raymond Lee Oyler ended Thursday with the prosecution describing the Beaumont mechanic as a murderer who set a killer wildfire for his own amusement and to satisfy a lust for power. The defense conceded that Oyler set 11 fires, just not the 2006 Esperanza fire that killed five firefighters. "Those five men were killed by a man who taught himself to use fire as a weapon," said Riverside County Deputy Dist. Atty. Michael Hestrin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2009 | David Kelly
The defense in the trial of Raymond Lee Oyler, charged with setting a wildfire that killed five firefighters, suffered a setback Friday when a judge rejected its plan to introduce a different suspect in the blaze. If convicted, Oyler, a 38-year-old Beaumont auto mechanic, would face the death penalty. Defense attorneys hoped to raise doubt about his guilt in the Esperanza fire by pointing to Michael McNeil, a former U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2009 | David Kelly
Raymond Lee Oyler, who is charged with setting the October 2006 Esperanza fire that killed five firefighters, was a serial arsonist whose girlfriend once gave him an ultimatum to stop setting fires or she would leave him, prosecutors said Thursday. In opening statements at Oyler's trial, Riverside County Deputy Dist. Atty. Michael Hestrin told jurors that the 38-year-old auto mechanic had set more than 20 fires in the San Gorgonio Pass area in the months before the fatal blaze.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2006 | Maeve Reston, Times Staff Writer
The incendiary device allegedly used to set the deadly wildfire that killed five firefighters in Riverside County three weeks ago was similar to devices used to set two earlier fires linked to suspected arsonist Raymond Lee Oyler, a court affidavit alleges. In all three fires, the arsonist set the blaze in the San Gorgonio Pass area by placing six or seven wooden matches atop a lighted cigarette, according to the court document.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2009 | David Kelly
The defense in the trial of Raymond Lee Oyler, charged with setting a wildfire that killed five firefighters, suffered a setback Friday when a judge rejected its plan to introduce a different suspect in the blaze. If convicted, Oyler, a 38-year-old Beaumont auto mechanic, would face the death penalty. Defense attorneys hoped to raise doubt about his guilt in the Esperanza fire by pointing to Michael McNeil, a former U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2009 | By Jack Leonard
A former security guard accused of fatally shooting an 18-year-old college student in a Palmdale parking lot nearly a decade ago was convicted of murder Friday, authorities said. The verdict caps a lengthy legal saga that began when Raymond Lee Jennings first reported finding Michelle O'Keefe's body during a routine patrol of the park-and-ride lot. Investigators found the victim, a student at Antelope Valley College, slumped in the front seat of her Ford Mustang. She had been shot four times in the chest and face.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two U.S. Citizens Sentenced in Bank Swindle: The Americans, convicted of trying to swindle $10 billion from a Chinese bank, lost their appeals and were sentenced to prison terms of 14 and 20 years. It was one of the most serious swindles ever attempted against a Chinese bank, and consequently the sentences were among the heaviest handed down in China against U.S. citizens.
MAGAZINE
June 25, 1989 | BARBARA FOLEY, Barbara Foley, former West Coast fashion editor of Women's Wear Daily and W, is a free-lance fashion writer
MODERN Objects was a small, 2-year-old art gallery on the unhip eastern stretch of Melrose Avenue when entrepreneur Mario Tamayo decided last October to team up with men's fashion designer Jef Huereque and transform the gallery into a clothing store. They both wanted an unpredictable, hip but homey kind of place. "We love color, we love all kinds of people and elements working together, and we love humor," begins Tamayo, 31, who also owns Cha Cha Cha and Cafe Mambo, a couple of high-energy Caribbean restaurants in the same East Hollywood neighborhood as Modern Objects.
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