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Raymond Lewis

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March 17, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 In trying to put together a short list of the best high school basketball players in Southern California history over the weekend, certainly Raymond Lewis from Los Angeles Verbum Dei deserves to be mentioned, as pointed out by several readers. Here's the link to a story about his accomplishments. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
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SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 In trying to put together a short list of the best high school basketball players in Southern California history over the weekend, certainly Raymond Lewis from Los Angeles Verbum Dei deserves to be mentioned, as pointed out by several readers. Here's the link to a story about his accomplishments. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
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NEWS
December 5, 1993
After reading your article reliving the legend of the great Raymond Lewis ("The Shooting Legend That the NBA Forgot," Nov. 14), I would like to make a clarification about Lewis' all-too-short career at Cal State Los Angeles. I attended Cal State L.A. during 1972-75 and witnessed several Diablo--they were not yet called the Golden Eagles--basketball games. Cal State did not play Indiana State and Larry Bird in the 1973 Bill Cosby Classic. The Bird in that game was William (Bird)
SPORTS
February 17, 2001
The article about the passing of Raymond Lewis triggered many memories and phone calls regarding the greatest high school basketball player to ever play in the Los Angeles area. Those of us who grew up and played basketball in the area then knew of his unequaled ability long before his accomplishments were more widely known. Our own high school team, Crescenta Valley, thought we had assembled a team (with our 29-0 record) that could beat Verbum Dei in the CIF championship of 1971. We could not. Raymond Lewis was an adversary we admired and respected.
SPORTS
February 14, 2001 | BILL PLASCHKE
"What round were you taken in the NBA draft?" Raymond Lewis held up one finger. "How many points did you score against Long Beach State?" He held up five fingers, then three fingers. "We're going to leave now." He curled his fingers tightly around my fingers. But he was too sick. The tubes and tape stuck to his chapped lips and withered body were too much. It was too late. We left. Everyone left.
MAGAZINE
August 4, 1991 | Lynn Smith, Lynn Smith is a Times staff writer in Orange County.
A LAZY SATURDAY MORNING IN MARCH, 1979. TWO SISTERS SIT IN A GARAGE SORTING through old family photos, looking for images of their heritage they can pass on to their children. Donna Friess, a college professor married to the mayor of San Juan Capistrano, has driven to nearby Laguna Niguel, to the home of her sister, Jackie Lewis Stack, a dentist.
NEWS
May 23, 1985 | DICK WAGNER, Times Staff Writer
The self-proclaimed best basketball player in the world is pudgy and pushing 32, but the playgrounds' chain nets still beckon him and he responds, as always, with jump shots as soft as summer kisses. Raymond Lewis is trying to get in shape. The roundness that his face and stomach have acquired from too much beer and lying around waiting for ankle injuries to heal irritates him. "You know what I'm gonna do tonight?
SPORTS
February 17, 2001
The article about the passing of Raymond Lewis triggered many memories and phone calls regarding the greatest high school basketball player to ever play in the Los Angeles area. Those of us who grew up and played basketball in the area then knew of his unequaled ability long before his accomplishments were more widely known. Our own high school team, Crescenta Valley, thought we had assembled a team (with our 29-0 record) that could beat Verbum Dei in the CIF championship of 1971. We could not. Raymond Lewis was an adversary we admired and respected.
MAGAZINE
September 15, 1991
These sick, undetected, life-destroying beings need to be exposed for all the world to see. I applaud these brave sisters, mothers and daughters for their courage and their strength of heart. I hope they can finally regain the guilt-free lives they deserve. As for Raymond Lewis, he lived like an oversexed dog--too bad he can't be castrated like one. REGINA NORMAN Sherman Oaks
SPORTS
February 14, 2001 | ROY JURGENS
*--* # PLAYER POSITION TEAM COLLEGE 1. DOUG COLLINS Guard Philadelphia Illinois State *--* * Averaged 17.9 points ineight-year career. * *--* # PLAYER POSITION TEAM COLLEGE 2. JIM BREWER Forward Cleveland Minnesota *--* * Spot starter averaged career-high 11.5 points in 1975-76. * *--* # PLAYER POSITION TEAM COLLEGE 3. ERNIE DiGREGORIO Guard Buffalo Providence *--* * Rookie of the year had career cut short by injury. * *--* # PLAYER POSITION TEAM COLLEGE 4.
SPORTS
February 14, 2001 | ROY JURGENS
*--* # PLAYER POSITION TEAM COLLEGE 1. DOUG COLLINS Guard Philadelphia Illinois State *--* * Averaged 17.9 points ineight-year career. * *--* # PLAYER POSITION TEAM COLLEGE 2. JIM BREWER Forward Cleveland Minnesota *--* * Spot starter averaged career-high 11.5 points in 1975-76. * *--* # PLAYER POSITION TEAM COLLEGE 3. ERNIE DiGREGORIO Guard Buffalo Providence *--* * Rookie of the year had career cut short by injury. * *--* # PLAYER POSITION TEAM COLLEGE 4.
SPORTS
February 14, 2001 | BILL PLASCHKE
"What round were you taken in the NBA draft?" Raymond Lewis held up one finger. "How many points did you score against Long Beach State?" He held up five fingers, then three fingers. "We're going to leave now." He curled his fingers tightly around my fingers. But he was too sick. The tubes and tape stuck to his chapped lips and withered body were too much. It was too late. We left. Everyone left.
NEWS
December 5, 1993
After reading your article reliving the legend of the great Raymond Lewis ("The Shooting Legend That the NBA Forgot," Nov. 14), I would like to make a clarification about Lewis' all-too-short career at Cal State Los Angeles. I attended Cal State L.A. during 1972-75 and witnessed several Diablo--they were not yet called the Golden Eagles--basketball games. Cal State did not play Indiana State and Larry Bird in the 1973 Bill Cosby Classic. The Bird in that game was William (Bird)
MAGAZINE
September 15, 1991
These sick, undetected, life-destroying beings need to be exposed for all the world to see. I applaud these brave sisters, mothers and daughters for their courage and their strength of heart. I hope they can finally regain the guilt-free lives they deserve. As for Raymond Lewis, he lived like an oversexed dog--too bad he can't be castrated like one. REGINA NORMAN Sherman Oaks
MAGAZINE
August 4, 1991 | Lynn Smith, Lynn Smith is a Times staff writer in Orange County.
A LAZY SATURDAY MORNING IN MARCH, 1979. TWO SISTERS SIT IN A GARAGE SORTING through old family photos, looking for images of their heritage they can pass on to their children. Donna Friess, a college professor married to the mayor of San Juan Capistrano, has driven to nearby Laguna Niguel, to the home of her sister, Jackie Lewis Stack, a dentist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Raymond O. Lewis, former United Mine Workers vice president and the younger brother of coal miners' leader John L. Lewis, has died in Florida at the age of 84, UMW officials said Wednesday. Lewis, who served as vice president of the international union and led the Charleston-based UMW District 17, the largest of the union's 21 districts, died Monday in Fort Myers, Fla., where he had lived since retiring in 1965.
SPORTS
March 15, 1985
Those who marveled at his shooting for Verbum Dei High School and Cal State L.A. never understood how Raymond Lewis failed to make it in the NBA. Maybe it was a matter of a sharpshooter from Los Angeles running into a faster gun from Brooklyn. When Lewis reported to the Philadelphia 76ers in 1975, also reporting was Lloyd Free, a hardship draftee from Guilford College. Free, who eventually adopted his nickname of World, was a product of Brooklyn's tough Brownsville section.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Raymond O. Lewis, former United Mine Workers vice president and the younger brother of coal miners' leader John L. Lewis, has died in Florida at the age of 84, UMW officials said Wednesday. Lewis, who served as vice president of the international union and led the Charleston-based UMW District 17, the largest of the union's 21 districts, died Monday in Fort Myers, Fla., where he had lived since retiring in 1965.
NEWS
May 23, 1985 | DICK WAGNER, Times Staff Writer
The self-proclaimed best basketball player in the world is pudgy and pushing 32, but the playgrounds' chain nets still beckon him and he responds, as always, with jump shots as soft as summer kisses. Raymond Lewis is trying to get in shape. The roundness that his face and stomach have acquired from too much beer and lying around waiting for ankle injuries to heal irritates him. "You know what I'm gonna do tonight?
SPORTS
March 15, 1985
Those who marveled at his shooting for Verbum Dei High School and Cal State L.A. never understood how Raymond Lewis failed to make it in the NBA. Maybe it was a matter of a sharpshooter from Los Angeles running into a faster gun from Brooklyn. When Lewis reported to the Philadelphia 76ers in 1975, also reporting was Lloyd Free, a hardship draftee from Guilford College. Free, who eventually adopted his nickname of World, was a product of Brooklyn's tough Brownsville section.
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