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Raymond Loewy

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By David Ng
Raymond Loewy, the renowned industrial designer who was instrumental in creating the Coca-Cola bottle and Studebaker automobiles, received a Google tribute Tuesday, the 120th anniversary of his birth. The French-born Loewy was one of the key industrial designers of the 20th century, working with numerous companies to create products and logos that would enter the public consciousness. Among his most recognizable designs were the Shell logo, the Lucky Strike cigarette package and the Greyhound bus. His firm even helped to create the name "Exxon" for Standard Oil. PHOTOS: Arts and culture in pictures by The Times Perhaps his most fruitful collaboration was with Studebaker, with whom he worked from 1936 to 1963.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2013 | By Bob Pool
The U.S. Postal Service wanted to honor slain President John F. Kennedy, but first it needed Jackie Kennedy's stamp of approval. That's how a Los Angeles Times photo came to be chosen for the first commemorative postage stamp honoring the fallen president following his Nov. 22, 1963, assassination in Dallas. The 5-cent stamp issued on May 29, 1964, was based on a photo of then-Sen. Kennedy during a visit to the Santa Monica beachfront home of his brother-in-law, actor Peter Lawford, by Times staff photographer William S. Murphy.
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NEWS
July 15, 1986 | KEITH LOVE, Times Staff Writer
Raymond Loewy, the industrial designer whose classic creations included the Studebaker car, the Coca-Cola bottle and the U.S. Postal Service eagle, died Monday in Monte Carlo, Monaco, where he had lived since 1980. Loewy was 92 and his wife, Viola, said he died peacefully of natural causes. Although several men, including the late Henry Dreyfuss, were responsible for the rapid growth of industrial design in this century, Loewy was the most influential.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By David Ng
Raymond Loewy, the renowned industrial designer who was instrumental in creating the Coca-Cola bottle and Studebaker automobiles, received a Google tribute Tuesday, the 120th anniversary of his birth. The French-born Loewy was one of the key industrial designers of the 20th century, working with numerous companies to create products and logos that would enter the public consciousness. Among his most recognizable designs were the Shell logo, the Lucky Strike cigarette package and the Greyhound bus. His firm even helped to create the name "Exxon" for Standard Oil. PHOTOS: Arts and culture in pictures by The Times Perhaps his most fruitful collaboration was with Studebaker, with whom he worked from 1936 to 1963.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2013 | By Bob Pool
The U.S. Postal Service wanted to honor slain President John F. Kennedy, but first it needed Jackie Kennedy's stamp of approval. That's how a Los Angeles Times photo came to be chosen for the first commemorative postage stamp honoring the fallen president following his Nov. 22, 1963, assassination in Dallas. The 5-cent stamp issued on May 29, 1964, was based on a photo of then-Sen. Kennedy during a visit to the Santa Monica beachfront home of his brother-in-law, actor Peter Lawford, by Times staff photographer William S. Murphy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2001
With two major donations to local art museums in two months, Ford Motor Co.'s Irvine-based Lincoln is connecting with its artistic side. Lincoln has agreed to sponsor an upcoming exhibition, "American Modern, 1925-1940: Design for a New Age," opening May 26 at the Orange County Museum of Art in Newport Beach. The car maker will underwrite $50,000 for the show.
HOME & GARDEN
October 11, 2007 | David A. Keeps
Los Angeles Modern Auctions will present its first California design sale on Sunday, with nearly 500 home furnishings, artworks, even an early 1960s Raymond Loewy-designed Studebaker Avanti. Among the other highlights: architectural drawings by Richard Neutra, Architectural Pottery ceramics, lighting by Greta Magnusson Grossman and lithographs by Ed Ruscha. Mass-produced furniture by now-defunct L.A.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | CONNIE KOENENN
A molded plywood chair designed by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen will be auctioned as part of an "Icons of 20th Century Design" sale Sunday in Beverly Hills. It's a centerpiece for more than 500 items of furniture, glass, pottery and decorative arts to be sold by Los Angeles Modern Auctions at leased space in the Chait Gallery, 9330 Civic Center Drive. The "Conversation" armchair, a major influence on 20th century design, was part of the only Eames-Saarinen collaboration.
NEWS
May 2, 1989
Donald Deskey, one of the last if not the last of the Art Deco designers of the 1930s and beyond, has died at age 94 in Vero Beach, Fla., where he had lived since retiring in 1975. The designer of packaging for the Procter & Gamble Co. (Crest, Aqua Velva, Cheer, Oxydol, Prell, et al.) and innovator whose streamlined interior of Radio City Music Hall in New York has become a national landmark, died Saturday of pneumonia, the New York Times reported. With Raymond Loewy, Norman Bel Geddes and others Deskey gave America a new look with their innovative uses of common industrial materials, such as corrugated metal in showrooms and prefabricated homes.
MAGAZINE
November 22, 1987
AT THE HEIGHT of radio's Golden Age, the wooden consoles that had become fa miliar fixtures in homes across America underwent a startling transformation. The plastics revolution gave manufacturers an inexpensive medium for creating table radios with designs as fresh--and sometimes as whimsical--as the programs that came through their four-inch speakers.
NEWS
July 15, 1986 | KEITH LOVE, Times Staff Writer
Raymond Loewy, the industrial designer whose classic creations included the Studebaker car, the Coca-Cola bottle and the U.S. Postal Service eagle, died Monday in Monte Carlo, Monaco, where he had lived since 1980. Loewy was 92 and his wife, Viola, said he died peacefully of natural causes. Although several men, including the late Henry Dreyfuss, were responsible for the rapid growth of industrial design in this century, Loewy was the most influential.
NEWS
February 28, 2001
* Compiled by Joan Denver. Readers are advised to call ahead to verify events and times, which are subject to change. Send listings to Miss Information's Automotive Calendar of Events, 6475 E. Pacific Coast Highway, Suite 375, Long Beach, CA 90803. To fax listings: (714) 761-3500. To subscribe: (714) 229-9100. Coming Events SATURDAY Palm Springs. Industrial designer Raymond Loewy, whose works include the U.S.
HOME & GARDEN
October 1, 2011 | Sam Watters
Fred MacMurray was a 26-year-old, square-jawed guy from Beaver Dam, Wis., when he became a Hollywood star, signing a contract with Paramount Pictures in 1934. Two years later he'd earned enough money to marry his sweetheart, model Lillian Lamont. They had what Mommie-Not-So-Dearest Joan Crawford called "one of the few happy and well-adjusted marriages. " MacMurray was a straight shooter, a hard-working, All-American success who batted the ball out of the park in a 50-year film and TV career.
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