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Raymond Myers

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1994 | DON SNOWDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Raymond Myers' performance at the Long Beach Museum of Art on Wednesday may be a harbinger for Caribbean music. The former lead singer with Nigeria's Soul Vibrations reggae group used the Jamaican sound as his musical base but mixed in Nicaraguan carnival and soca rhythms, plus an occasional dash of salsa, into his pair of hour-plus sets. Myers is staying in Los Angeles while recording, so his capable, well-rehearsed septet didn't quite have the spark and cohesion of a full-time unit.
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NEWS
January 24, 1997
Dr. Raymond Myer Kay, 92, a pioneer of prepaid medical care who co-founded Kaiser Permanente in Southern California. In 1949, Kay helped to establish the Southern California Permanente Medical Group, a forerunner of today's health maintenance organizations, and served as its medical director until 1969. In the 1950s, Kay and his associates were ostracized by fee-for-service doctors because they had organized as a multi-specialty group paid by a prepaid insurance plan.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1994 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Raymond Myers knows that when things get as ugly as they often have in his native Nicaragua, it's vital to hold on to pride and hope to keep the spirit alive. Myers, 31, is a reggae musician from Bluefields, on Nicaragua's Caribbean coast. He has long witnessed unemployment, crime and political unrest engulf his war-torn homeland. Like many before him, Myers has used music as an outlet for both his anger and longing for peace.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1994 | DON SNOWDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Raymond Myers' performance at the Long Beach Museum of Art on Wednesday may be a harbinger for Caribbean music. The former lead singer with Nigeria's Soul Vibrations reggae group used the Jamaican sound as his musical base but mixed in Nicaraguan carnival and soca rhythms, plus an occasional dash of salsa, into his pair of hour-plus sets. Myers is staying in Los Angeles while recording, so his capable, well-rehearsed septet didn't quite have the spark and cohesion of a full-time unit.
NEWS
June 30, 1994 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Raymond Myers knows that when things get as ugly as they often have been in his native Nicaragua, it's vital to hold on to pride and hope in order to keep the spirit alive. Myers, 31, is a reggae musician from Bluesfield, on Nicaragua's Atlantic coast. He has seen unemployment, crime and political unrest engulf his war-torn homeland. Like many before him, Myers has used music as an outlet for both his anger and longing for peace.
NEWS
January 24, 1997
Dr. Raymond Myer Kay, 92, a pioneer of prepaid medical care who co-founded Kaiser Permanente in Southern California. In 1949, Kay helped to establish the Southern California Permanente Medical Group, a forerunner of today's health maintenance organizations, and served as its medical director until 1969. In the 1950s, Kay and his associates were ostracized by fee-for-service doctors because they had organized as a multi-specialty group paid by a prepaid insurance plan.
NEWS
August 3, 1995 | BILL LOCEY
Reggae, which seems to have more celebrations and birthdays than a year of Februarys, will fete itself once again during the second annual Reggae Jam on the Coast this weekend at College Park in Oxnard. Even though it's not even Bob Marley's birthday, the slick and the dread will be able to dance around in the sun--or fog--to a stellar lineup of reggae heavyweights, mon. Make that experienced heavyweights, mon. Saturday's lineup includes Edi Fitzroy, the frontman for Massawa.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1997 | DON HECKMAN
The Caribbean Festival at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre on Saturday, which featured Nicaraguan Raymond Myers and the ensemble Conjunto Jardin, was Caribbean in intent more than delivery. There was plenty of reggae, some calypso and some salsa. But of Cuban and Puerto Rican music, there was virtually none--to mention only two significant absences. And any attempt to illustrate the music of the Caribbean that does not heavily emphasize those arenas leaves something to be desired.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1994 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Delafose has played a lot of places in his 40-some years fronting a zydeco band: dance halls, dive bars, house parties, barbecues, fish fries, church basements and giant festivals before tens of thousands of fans. But Wednesday was the first time the veteran singer and accordion player could recall having played an art museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ali Akbar Khan, one of the great masters of Indian classical music, will receive 1997's National Heritage Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts award honoring folk and traditional arts. Khan, who is a master of the sarod, a 25-string, fretless instrument somewhat like the lute, will receive a grant of $10,000 in September, when the award is bestowed.
NEWS
June 30, 1994 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Raymond Myers knows that when things get as ugly as they often have been in his native Nicaragua, it's vital to hold on to pride and hope in order to keep the spirit alive. Myers, 31, is a reggae musician from Bluesfield, on Nicaragua's Atlantic coast. He has seen unemployment, crime and political unrest engulf his war-torn homeland. Like many before him, Myers has used music as an outlet for both his anger and longing for peace.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1994 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Raymond Myers knows that when things get as ugly as they often have in his native Nicaragua, it's vital to hold on to pride and hope to keep the spirit alive. Myers, 31, is a reggae musician from Bluefields, on Nicaragua's Caribbean coast. He has long witnessed unemployment, crime and political unrest engulf his war-torn homeland. Like many before him, Myers has used music as an outlet for both his anger and longing for peace.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1995 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The 12th annual Street Scene takes place here tonight through Sunday with a lineup of more than 100 performers--far and away the most comprehensive the fest has offered yet. A diverse array, it is being served up on 12 stages covering 21 blocks in downtown's Gaslamp Quarter, and for the first time, a third day of shows has been added.
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