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Raymond Seitz

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NEWS
May 11, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is not rich. He is not politically connected. He is not a contributor to an American presidential election campaign. And he is a highly regarded career diplomat. Raymond Seitz, 50, thus, would appear a most unlikely choice as U.S. ambassador to the Court of St. James's, as the London post is known. It is a job that traditionally goes to a wealthy, political contributor.
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NEWS
May 11, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is not rich. He is not politically connected. He is not a contributor to an American presidential election campaign. And he is a highly regarded career diplomat. Raymond Seitz, 50, thus, would appear a most unlikely choice as U.S. ambassador to the Court of St. James's, as the London post is known. It is a job that traditionally goes to a wealthy, political contributor.
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NEWS
May 5, 1991 | Associated Press
Raymond Seitz, the first career foreign service officer to be appointed U.S. ambassador to London, arrived Friday to take up his post. Seitz, 50, replaces Henry Catto, who resigned to direct the U.S. Information Agency.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A group of shareholders led by investment manager K Capital Management has urged newspaper publisher Sun-Times Media Group Inc. to put itself up for sale immediately, according to a regulatory filing Thursday. K Capital said in the filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that "immediate action must be taken to preserve shareholder value due to the company's recent operational deterioration." K Capital reported holding a 9.9% stake in the Chicago company.
NEWS
August 15, 1989
The Soviet Union, despite two high-level U.S. appeals, last week conducted an intercontinental missile test near two remote Hawaiian Islands, Bush Administration officials said. The 8,000-mile-range, unarmed missile, launched from the Soviet Union, flew between the two tiny islands, Necker and Nihoa. U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Raymond R. Seitz and his deputy, Curtis W. Kamman, both made appeals to Deputy Ambassador Sergei B.
NEWS
January 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The White House said there was no reason to believe allegations that U.S. government officials leaked British intelligence secrets to the Irish Republican Army. White House Press Secretary Mike McCurry also told reporters that the charges would not be investigated. Claims in excerpts from the memoirs of Raymond Seitz, a former U.S. ambassador to London, that the White House leaked British intelligence secrets to the IRA have been denounced on both sides of the Atlantic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1993
On the face of it there is absolutely nothing wrong with the White House's apparent decision to nominate Adm. William J. Crowe Jr. as ambassador to Great Britain. American Presidents have almost infinite leeway on such appointments, Crowe was one of the few top military men to support Bill Clinton's candidacy last year and the former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is not only a fine public official but a well-liked one, too.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | From Reuters
President Bush today reaffirmed U.S. support for Poland's present borders and assured Warsaw that it will have a voice in any issues, including German reunification, that affect Poland's future. "In all decisions affecting the fate of Poland, Poland must have a voice," Bush said at a state welcoming ceremony for Polish Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The United States renewed diplomatic relations with Albania on Friday after a break of 52 years and urged the last Communist state of Eastern Europe to move ahead with democratic reform. At a State Department ceremony in Washington, Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs Raymond Seitz and Albanian Foreign Minister Muhamet Kapllani signed a memo of understanding restoring relations severed in June, 1939.
NEWS
June 4, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disagreements between the United States and its Western European allies over tactics and goals in Bosnia-Herzegovina are contributing to a serious rift in the Western security alliance, some diplomats say. To Europeans, American leadership in Europe seems to be waning after a period of mutual misunderstanding, creating a situation in which, as the Times of London put it this week, "The Atlantic gets wider every day."
NEWS
July 22, 1991 | The Times' Washington Bureau
BACK-HOME BLUES: President Bush faces a spate of potentially thorny domestic disputes with Congress when he returns today from his trip to Greece and Turkey in the wake of last week's seven-nation Western economic summit in London. The battle lines are already drawn: Bush's nomination of Robert M. Gates to be director of Central Intelligence has been placed on hold while lawmakers look into Gates' possible involvement in the Iran-Contra scandal.
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