Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRaymond St Jacques
IN THE NEWS

Raymond St Jacques

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 31, 1990
A funeral service for Raymond St. Jacques, noted multilingual actor who broke racial barriers for blacks in films and television, is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. today at the Church of the Recessional in Forest Lawn, Glendale. Interment will be in Forest Lawn, Hollywood Hills. St. Jacques, 60, whose credits included the television series "Rawhide" and the film "Cotton Comes to Harlem," died Monday of cancer of the lymph glands.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 31, 1990
A funeral service for Raymond St. Jacques, noted multilingual actor who broke racial barriers for blacks in films and television, is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. today at the Church of the Recessional in Forest Lawn, Glendale. Interment will be in Forest Lawn, Hollywood Hills. St. Jacques, 60, whose credits included the television series "Rawhide" and the film "Cotton Comes to Harlem," died Monday of cancer of the lymph glands.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Actor Raymond St. Jacques, known for his breakthrough roles in such movies as "Black Like Me" and "Glory" as well as the TV miniseries "Roots," has died of cancer. He was 60. St. Jacques died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center at 1:30 p.m. Monday, hospital spokeswoman Paula Correia said Tuesday. He had been under treatment for cancer of the lymph glands since entering the hospital on July 30. St.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Actor Raymond St. Jacques, known for his breakthrough roles in such movies as "Black Like Me" and "Glory" as well as the TV miniseries "Roots," has died of cancer. He was 60. St. Jacques died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center at 1:30 p.m. Monday, hospital spokeswoman Paula Correia said Tuesday. He had been under treatment for cancer of the lymph glands since entering the hospital on July 30. St.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1985
Loretta Young, who had been set to return to series TV next season after an absence of 24 years, dropped out of the show Thursday. Her agent and producer, Aaron Spelling, cited "creative differences." Young, 72, had been scheduled to report Thursday for a get-acquainted meeting with other cast members signed for "Dark Mansions," a Gothic serial that ABC plans to introduce next season.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1987 | LEONARD KLADY
"The Wild Pair" (citywide) from all outward appearances has the smell of a contemporary movie cop partnership. One instinctively knows that Joe Jennings (Beau Bridges) and Benny Avalon (Bubba Smith) have spent years exchanging endlessly bright, glib banter while defying more death threats than a film critic has eaten tubs of popcorn. The good news is that this first look is indeed deceiving.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Glory" (opening Friday throughout San Diego County) is an eloquent, heart-tugging Civil War epic about the first black infantry regiment to march off to battle for the Union. And epic is the word. Not since John Ford has a film maker created such dramatic large-scale Civil War battle scenes in a major theatrical film.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Glory" (at the Cineplex Odeon Century City) is an eloquent, heart-tugging Civil War epic about the first black infantry regiment to march off to battle for the Union. And epic is the word. Not since John Ford has a film maker created such dramatic large-scale Civil War battle scenes in a major theatrical film. However, without its fresh focus on the role of the black soldiers in the Civil War, "Glory" would seem old-fashioned in its unabashedly sentimental conflict between good and evil.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Lonne Elder III's "Ceremonies in Dark Old Men" is a remarkably sturdy play. At age 18, it is only slightly creaky, a bit long, doggedly realistic, but it has kept its shape and a great deal of its power--at least in the hands of the capable actors who are reviving it at the Beverly Canon Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1991 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It is a world where the blind can see and women are men, where the body count is always in double figures and the double cross takes no one by surprise. It is a sensual, surreal, cartoonishly violent and breathtakingly bawdy comic universe, more upside down and inside out than Alice's Wonderland. But in the novels of Chester Himes, the ambience of this anarchic fairy tale is black not white, and now, in "A Rage in Harlem," it comes to us in an especially exuberant and entertaining package.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
Being a producer, Dorothy Lyman is finding out, isn't exactly a glamour job. "Most of the time," she said cheerfully, "I'm on my knees scrubbing floors, sweeping. And now that we're about to open, I've got all these other things to worry about: Are the walls the right color? Is the wrapping off the plumbing equipment in the basement?" The Emmy-winning actress laughed. "All this because I wanted to direct a play." It's a bit more than that.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|