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Raymond Suttner

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NEWS
September 6, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
University law lecturer Raymond Suttner, the government's longest-serving white detainee, was released from jail Monday, two years and three months after he was arrested by the South African authorities under an hours-old state of emergency. Suttner, 43, was freed "on humanitarian grounds" because his health has deteriorated, Adriaan Vlok, the government's minister of law and order, said in a statement. At the same time, though, Vlok ordered Suttner's activities severely restricted.
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NEWS
September 6, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
University law lecturer Raymond Suttner, the government's longest-serving white detainee, was released from jail Monday, two years and three months after he was arrested by the South African authorities under an hours-old state of emergency. Suttner, 43, was freed "on humanitarian grounds" because his health has deteriorated, Adriaan Vlok, the government's minister of law and order, said in a statement. At the same time, though, Vlok ordered Suttner's activities severely restricted.
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NEWS
June 24, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The African National Congress formally broke off constitutional negotiations with all parties Tuesday and vowed not to return to the table until President Frederik W. de Klerk meets a long list of demands aimed at ending alleged security force involvement in township violence. The decision by South Africa's leading black opposition group, approved without dissent by its 90-member national executive committee, indefinitely halted the search for a negotiated settlement.
NEWS
July 8, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The historic convention of the African National Congress, which ended early Sunday, removed any doubt that supporters of the onetime guerrilla movement are committed to negotiations--but are also deeply suspicious of the white-controlled government. The result of that militant pragmatism is likely to be renewed clashes with the government over ANC protest marches and resistance campaigns, such as the occupation of empty white schools by pupils in severely overcrowded black schools.
NEWS
October 15, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Raymond Suttner dropped off a pair of slacks for alterations a few days ago and, like many people with a busy schedule, he had to do some figuring to decide whether he would be able to pick them up that afternoon. Suttner, a professor of law, had on his schedule, as he does every day, a trip to his local police station, where he has to check in between 3 and 4 p.m. or risk arrest. He could drive across town to collect his slacks after that, but he would have to be back in his house by 6 p.m.
WORLD
April 6, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
PRETORIA, South Africa - Johan Gerber is a shy, neat man with iron-gray hair, a ready smile and a quiet voice. But on the streets, he has taken to carrying an open pocket knife with a mean 4-inch blade, concealed in an envelope and ready to use. Last month, three men accosted him in broad daylight, one of whom hit him in the stomach and grabbed his cellphone. A few years back, eight men surrounded him, held a knife to his throat and stole his wallet. His car and two trailers also have been stolen.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
A bespectacled anthropologist, David Webster, concluded a recent paper on repression in South Africa by singling out the "steady tempo" of anti-apartheid activists slain by right-wing death squads. Webster said these clandestine groups control government opponents by assassination after official methods, such as detention, have failed. "It is a very rare event indeed when such assassinations are ever solved," he added. On Saturday, before that paper could even be published, about 5,000 white and black South Africans marched through Johannesburg's white suburbs to bury Webster, himself a victim of an assassination squad.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massacre victims have been buried, their blood washed from the shacks of this dusty township. The politicians have had their say, rallying their supporters. And South Africa stands at a crossroads, one of the most crucial in its long history of racial strife, with negotiations suspended and the death toll from township violence still climbing.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a landmark speech that shocked both black and white South Africans, President Frederik W. de Klerk on Friday lifted the 30-year ban on the African National Congress and other anti-apartheid groups, sharply scaled back the 3 1/2-year-old state of emergency and announced his "firm decision" to soon release jailed black nationalist Nelson R. Mandela.
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