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Raymond W Smith

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BUSINESS
April 26, 1989
Raymond W. Smith, president and chief executive of Bell Atlantic Corp., Philadelphia, has been elected chairman and chief executive. Smith will become chairman on July 1, succeeding Thomas E. Bolger, who will remain on the board. Bolger has led Bell Atlantic as its first chairman and CEO. He retired as CEO on Dec. 31. Anton J. Campanella, who is now president and CEO of New Jersey Bell, was elected president of Bell Atlantic, effective July 1.
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BUSINESS
April 22, 1996 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raymond W. Smith, the gregarious, ambitious chief executive of Bell Atlantic Corp., once wrote a play about four friends who reach age 50 without accomplishing anything. It appears Smith is unlikely to be a character in his own play. In fact, he just may close the deal of a lifetime by merging Bell Atlantic with its neighbor Nynex to create the nation's second-most-powerful communications company and an important global player.
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BUSINESS
October 14, 1993 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times. He can be reached by electronic mail at schrage@latimes.com on the Internet
When it comes to being brilliant, bold and visionary, Bell Atlantic's proposed multibillion-dollar acquisition of John Malone's Tele- Communications Inc. is eerily reminiscent of another technology-driven mega-corporate marriage: General Motors' 1984 acquisition of Ross Perot's EDS. In fact, Bell Atlantic Chairman Ray Smith may soon find himself feeling an awful lot as former GM Chairman Roger Smith felt after the staid auto giant purchased Perot's hot-shot computer services company.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1993 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raymond W. Smith--an amateur actor, director and playwright--suddenly commands the biggeststage in the media world. Now the question is whether the chairman and chief executive of Bell Atlantic Corp. is up to the role. In running the Philadelphia-based phone company that plans to swallow cable television giant Tele-Communications Inc., Smith, 56, has won a reputation as the savviest leader among the seven Baby Bells.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1993 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raymond W. Smith--an amateur actor, director and playwright--suddenly commands the biggeststage in the media world. Now the question is whether the chairman and chief executive of Bell Atlantic Corp. is up to the role. In running the Philadelphia-based phone company that plans to swallow cable television giant Tele-Communications Inc., Smith, 56, has won a reputation as the savviest leader among the seven Baby Bells.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1996 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raymond W. Smith, the gregarious, ambitious chief executive of Bell Atlantic Corp., once wrote a play about four friends who reach age 50 without accomplishing anything. It appears Smith is unlikely to be a character in his own play. In fact, he just may close the deal of a lifetime by merging Bell Atlantic with its neighbor Nynex to create the nation's second-most-powerful communications company and an important global player.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1998 | Associated Press and Bloomberg News
Bell Atlantic Corp. said Raymond W. Smith is stepping aside early as chief executive to let Ivan Seidenberg lead the telecommunications giant in the next phase of its growth. Seidenberg, Bell Atlantic's chief operating officer, will become CEO on June 1 rather than on Aug. 14, as originally planned. Seidenberg was CEO of Nynex Corp., which Bell Atlantic bought last August, creating the nation's second-largest phone company, behind AT&T Corp.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1995
"AT&T is reinventing itself once again." --Robert E. Allen, Chairman, AT&T "That's a heck of a jump in stock price for one action ... but I don't think it's going to have much impact on the industry. They were a formidable company when they were improperly structured and they will be a formidable competitor now. They've just, in essence, opened up the kennel door and let out their worst and mangiest flea-bitten dogs." --Tim Price, president, MCI Telecommunications Corp.
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Analysts and friends who've followed the hard-charging career of Tele-Communications Inc. Chief Executive John C. Malone were surprised Wednesday by Malone's decision to sell TCI to Bell Atlantic and settle for the vice chairman's job at the still-youthful age of 52. But the deal accomplishes two important things for the cable magnate--it creates enormous wealth, and it removes him from the front line of fire in the battle over cable regulation.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1993 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an indication of the Clinton Administration's stance toward the mega-merger between Bell Atlantic and Tele-Communications Inc., the Justice Department reiterated Friday that it would appeal a federal judge's decision allowing local phone companies to provide cable TV service in their operating areas. The appeal is not enough of a threat to derail the merger, but it could influence the operations of the merged corporation and hamper other cable TV-telephone company combinations.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1993 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times. He can be reached by electronic mail at schrage@latimes.com on the Internet
When it comes to being brilliant, bold and visionary, Bell Atlantic's proposed multibillion-dollar acquisition of John Malone's Tele- Communications Inc. is eerily reminiscent of another technology-driven mega-corporate marriage: General Motors' 1984 acquisition of Ross Perot's EDS. In fact, Bell Atlantic Chairman Ray Smith may soon find himself feeling an awful lot as former GM Chairman Roger Smith felt after the staid auto giant purchased Perot's hot-shot computer services company.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1989
Raymond W. Smith, president and chief executive of Bell Atlantic Corp., Philadelphia, has been elected chairman and chief executive. Smith will become chairman on July 1, succeeding Thomas E. Bolger, who will remain on the board. Bolger has led Bell Atlantic as its first chairman and CEO. He retired as CEO on Dec. 31. Anton J. Campanella, who is now president and CEO of New Jersey Bell, was elected president of Bell Atlantic, effective July 1.
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