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Rayovac Corp

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BUSINESS
August 23, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Rayovac Corp. agreed to buy closely held Remington Products Co. for about $165 million in cash to enter the more profitable razor business. The purchase, which totals $322 million after the assumption of debt, will add to profit next year, Madison, Wis.-based Rayovac said. Rayovac is cutting reliance on batteries amid slowing sales and competition from Gillette Co. and Energizer Holdings Inc. Rayovac shares rose 65 cents to $14.25 on the NYSE.
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BUSINESS
December 25, 2006 | Emily Fredrix, The Associated Press
Batteries that can be recharged rather than tossed when the juice runs out are supposed to be more convenient for consumers. But for Wren Wright, they lose their power too quickly and unpredictably, sometimes leaving the shutterbug with no power for his digital camera. Now, major battery makers are recharging their offerings with new models that promise to hold their power longer and don't have to be plugged in for hours before the first use.
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BUSINESS
January 4, 2005 | From Reuters
Battery maker Rayovac Corp. is close to a deal to acquire privately held United Industries Corp., a maker of lawn and garden products, for about $500 million in cash and stock in a bid to diversify its product mix, sources said. The transaction, which includes the assumption of about $900 million in United Industries debt, could be announced as early as today, the sources said. Shares of Atlanta-based Rayovac fell $1 to $29.56 on the New York Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2005 | From Associated Press
Battery maker Rayovac Corp.'s announcement that it will purchase privately held United Industries Corp., maker of lawn care and pet supply products, for about $546 million in stock and cash was cheered Tuesday by Wall Street as an opportunity by Rayovac to transform itself into a more diversified company. Rayovac shares rose 17% to a record high. The deal will allow Atlanta-based Rayovac, third behind Gillette Co.'s Duracell and Energizer Holdings Inc.'s Energizer in the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1998
* Rayovac Corp. announced a $9.5-million restructuring that will result in about 60 jobs being cut to reduce costs. The battery maker said it expects to save about $5 million annually after full implementation of the changes, expected early next year. * Thousands of small businesses--including restaurants, barbershops and funeral parlors--would not have to pay licensing fees for piped-in copyrighted music under a bill passed by the House of Representatives and that now goes before the Senate.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rayovac to Sell 80% of Its Equity: The Madison, Wis.-based company said the investment firm of Thomas H. Lee Co. agreed to buy 80% of the nation's third-largest battery maker. Neither closely held Rayovac Corp. nor Thomas H. Lee Co., a Boston-based buyout firm, would disclose the terms of the agreement. Rayovac trails Ralston-Purina Group's Eveready and Duracell International Inc. with about 25% of the battery market.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2001 | Reuters
Rayovac Corp., the No. 3 battery maker in the United States, said it will cut about 280 domestic jobs, or about 8% of its global work force, as part of an $18-million restructuring plan. The company will lay off about 240 employees when it closes its Wonewoc, Wis.-based lantern battery plant, which Rayovac said it expects to complete by August 2001.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2005 | From Associated Press
Battery maker Rayovac Corp.'s announcement that it will purchase privately held United Industries Corp., maker of lawn care and pet supply products, for about $546 million in stock and cash was cheered Tuesday by Wall Street as an opportunity by Rayovac to transform itself into a more diversified company. Rayovac shares rose 17% to a record high. The deal will allow Atlanta-based Rayovac, third behind Gillette Co.'s Duracell and Energizer Holdings Inc.'s Energizer in the U.S.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2006 | Emily Fredrix, The Associated Press
Batteries that can be recharged rather than tossed when the juice runs out are supposed to be more convenient for consumers. But for Wren Wright, they lose their power too quickly and unpredictably, sometimes leaving the shutterbug with no power for his digital camera. Now, major battery makers are recharging their offerings with new models that promise to hold their power longer and don't have to be plugged in for hours before the first use.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2002 | Associated Press
Rayovac Corp. said it has developed a new rechargeable battery that will take only 15 minutes to recharge. The technology will cut recharging time from one hour for its most powerful rechargeable batteries, designed for high-drain devices such as digital cameras, the Madison, Wis.-based battery maker said.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2005 | From Reuters
Battery maker Rayovac Corp. is close to a deal to acquire privately held United Industries Corp., a maker of lawn and garden products, for about $500 million in cash and stock in a bid to diversify its product mix, sources said. The transaction, which includes the assumption of about $900 million in United Industries debt, could be announced as early as today, the sources said. Shares of Atlanta-based Rayovac fell $1 to $29.56 on the New York Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Rayovac Corp. agreed to buy closely held Remington Products Co. for about $165 million in cash to enter the more profitable razor business. The purchase, which totals $322 million after the assumption of debt, will add to profit next year, Madison, Wis.-based Rayovac said. Rayovac is cutting reliance on batteries amid slowing sales and competition from Gillette Co. and Energizer Holdings Inc. Rayovac shares rose 65 cents to $14.25 on the NYSE.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2001 | Reuters
Rayovac Corp., the No. 3 battery maker in the United States, said it will cut about 280 domestic jobs, or about 8% of its global work force, as part of an $18-million restructuring plan. The company will lay off about 240 employees when it closes its Wonewoc, Wis.-based lantern battery plant, which Rayovac said it expects to complete by August 2001.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1998
* Rayovac Corp. announced a $9.5-million restructuring that will result in about 60 jobs being cut to reduce costs. The battery maker said it expects to save about $5 million annually after full implementation of the changes, expected early next year. * Thousands of small businesses--including restaurants, barbershops and funeral parlors--would not have to pay licensing fees for piped-in copyrighted music under a bill passed by the House of Representatives and that now goes before the Senate.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rayovac to Sell 80% of Its Equity: The Madison, Wis.-based company said the investment firm of Thomas H. Lee Co. agreed to buy 80% of the nation's third-largest battery maker. Neither closely held Rayovac Corp. nor Thomas H. Lee Co., a Boston-based buyout firm, would disclose the terms of the agreement. Rayovac trails Ralston-Purina Group's Eveready and Duracell International Inc. with about 25% of the battery market.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2002
* Humana Inc. said second-quarter profit rose to $45.4 million, or 27 cents a share, from $25.1 million, or 15 cents, a year earlier. Revenue advanced 13% to $2.8 billion from $2.5 billion. * El Paso Electric Co. will be allowed to continue selling electricity and natural gas at market prices, U.S. regulators said. * Rayovac Corp. agreed to buy the consumer-battery business of German rival Varta for $262 million in cash as the third-largest U.S battery maker tries to boost sales overseas.
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