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BUSINESS
August 7, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
LAS VEGAS -- When it comes to munitions, Raytheon Co. usually thinks big. Multi-ton bunker-busting bombs. Jet engine-powered cruise missiles. GPS-guided 500-pound bombs. Now the Waltham, Mass., defense giant believes it has something small to offer. After developing a 13.5-pound "smart bomb" for four years, Raytheon has carried out a successful test flight at the Army's Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona.  The bomb, called Pyros, was dropped from a drone flying at 7,000 feet and hit the designated bull's-eye on a target that lay below.
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BUSINESS
January 15, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Defense contractor Raytheon Co. announced Chief Executive William H. Swanson will step down in March and will be replaced by Chief Operating Officer Thomas A. Kennedy. Swanson, who turns 65 in February, has served as the company's CEO since 2003. He will continue to serve as chairman of the board of directors until the company completes the transition process. Kennedy, 58, has served as executive vice president and COO of Raytheon since last April and oversaw the consolidation of Raytheon's six business units to four.
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BUSINESS
August 31, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Raytheon Co., the world's third-largest aerospace and defense company, averted a strike by reaching a labor contract with workers who produce the company's Patriot missile. Raytheon said it will increase wages 5% in the first year of the two-year contract with 3,800 employees represented by Local 1505 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. Wages increase 4% in the second year of the contract, which also requires workers to pay more for health-care benefits.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Raytheon Co., the Waltham, Mass., aerospace giant, announced that two of its four business units will have new headquarters locations. Raytheon's space and airborne systems unit headquarters will move from El Segundo to McKinney, Texas, where the company already has a major presence. El Segundo City Manager Greg Carpenter said the move would result in the loss of 170 jobs. Raytheon would not comment on the job loss numbers. “We hate to lose any jobs in El Segundo,” he said.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Raytheon Co. Chief Executive William Swanson acknowledged a similarity of language between his book on management principles and a 62-year-old text, and said he regretted not citing the earlier work. The similarity between "Swanson's Unwritten Rules of Management" and a 1944 text by W.J. King called "The Unwritten Laws of Engineering" is "beyond dispute," Swanson said.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
General Motors Corp. will have a substantial say over the ability of Raytheon Co. to make major acquisitions and sell assets for two years after Raytheon buys GM's Hughes Electronics subsidiary, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. Raytheon, a Lexington, Mass.-based defense company, is on the verge of acquiring Westchester-based Hughes' defense business in a $10.1-billion transaction.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1989
Raytheon Co. in Oxnard won a $1,178,201 contract from the Air Force to provide engineering services.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1986
The Navy has qualified Raytheon Co., a major competitor to General Dynamics in building tactical missiles, to become a producer of its Standard Missile 2, a ship-to-air weapon. General Dynamics' Pomona division has been a sole source producer of the weapon. The Navy plans to buy 2,000 of the missiles annually through 1995. Last year, General Dynamics received $330,000 per missile. Raytheon has told the Navy that it can build the missiles for less.
NEWS
November 27, 1986 | Associated Press
The Pentagon's inspector general has concluded that top Navy officials "acted improperly" in lodging complaints with a defense contractor about one of its executives who had publicly criticized the department's budget request as too high. The executive was later fired. The report released Wednesday brought calls from the former executive, Dr. Lawrence J. Korb, from Rep. Denny Smith (R-Ore.) and from the American Civil Liberties Union for the removal of Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr.
NEWS
June 26, 1985
A business executive who had pleaded guilty to accepting nearly $250,000 in bribes and kickbacks on defense contracts was sentenced in Los Angeles federal court to six months in a community treatment facility and three years' probation. Chester Eugene Adamsky, 50, of San Diego solicited the kickbacks from three subcontractors while working for Raytheon Co., a Massachusetts-based defense contractor, prosecutors said. U.S. District Judge Mariana R.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
At a time when the aerospace industry is fretful about federal spending, defense contractor Raytheon Co. announced plans to eliminate one of its business units and slash 200 jobs. The Waltham, Mass., company did not say how those cuts will affect its 10,000 workers in California but disclosed that they will result in annual savings of about $85 million. Raytheon made the announcement as part of a larger business consolidation that aims to “achieve stronger alignment with its customers' priorities.” Under the plan, the company will go from six business units to four.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
LAS VEGAS -- When it comes to munitions, Raytheon Co. usually thinks big. Multi-ton bunker-busting bombs. Jet engine-powered cruise missiles. GPS-guided 500-pound bombs. Now the Waltham, Mass., defense giant believes it has something small to offer. After developing a 13.5-pound "smart bomb" for four years, Raytheon has carried out a successful test flight at the Army's Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona.  The bomb, called Pyros, was dropped from a drone flying at 7,000 feet and hit the designated bull's-eye on a target that lay below.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2011 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
State lawmakers passed an emergency bill Friday that would resurrect a troubled plan to build an emergency communication system in Los Angeles County for police and fire agencies. The project, which is estimated to cost around $600 million to $700 million, derailed last month after three years of planning, when county lawyers belatedly realized the nearly completed contract negotiations to build the complex system violated state rules on how contracts for publicly funded projects must be structured and awarded.
OPINION
August 8, 2011 | Jim Newton
There's trouble brewing at the Los Angeles County Hall of Administration, where a very big problem threatens to get much, much bigger. The issue revolves around a crucial communications network that would link Los Angeles County first responders. Last week, confronted with furious lobbying efforts by two companies competing for that project, the joint powers authority overseeing the project abruptly pulled the plug on negotiations and went back to the drawing board. The action will probably delay by months or years a system law enforcers say is essential.
OPINION
July 31, 2011
The tragedies of 9/11 tested first responders and exposed a weakness in their systems: Police, fire and hospital personnel in many areas, Los Angeles included, communicate on different electronic platforms and thus have difficulty coordinating their responses to large, complicated catastrophes. In Los Angeles, where earthquakes pose that challenge more frequently than acts of terrorism, 9/11 alerted local officials to the need for a coordinated communications network. The county's response was to launch a joint powers effort to develop what is known as the Los Angeles Regional Interoperable Communications System.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2011 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County leaders Thursday put the county at risk of losing hundreds of millions of dollars in federal funds when they voted to scrap years of planning for a vast emergency communications system and restart the search for companies to build the complex project. The drastic decision came three years after officials from the county and the many independent cities within its borders launched the massive project, which is expected to cost about $700 million to design and build.
OPINION
June 13, 2011 | Jim Newton
In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, public safety leaders in Southern California concluded that the need for a unified emergency communications system was so grave that they had to build it in such a way as to avoid the traditional pitfalls for huge, multi-agency projects: sloppiness, recriminations and politics. Ten years later, they are on the verge of commissioning such a system, but their efforts are beset by sloppiness, recriminations and politics. The huge undertaking goes by the ungainly acronym LA-RICS, short for the unwieldy full name: The Los Angeles Regional Interoperable Communications System.
OPINION
July 31, 2011
The tragedies of 9/11 tested first responders and exposed a weakness in their systems: Police, fire and hospital personnel in many areas, Los Angeles included, communicate on different electronic platforms and thus have difficulty coordinating their responses to large, complicated catastrophes. In Los Angeles, where earthquakes pose that challenge more frequently than acts of terrorism, 9/11 alerted local officials to the need for a coordinated communications network. The county's response was to launch a joint powers effort to develop what is known as the Los Angeles Regional Interoperable Communications System.
OPINION
June 13, 2011 | Jim Newton
In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, public safety leaders in Southern California concluded that the need for a unified emergency communications system was so grave that they had to build it in such a way as to avoid the traditional pitfalls for huge, multi-agency projects: sloppiness, recriminations and politics. Ten years later, they are on the verge of commissioning such a system, but their efforts are beset by sloppiness, recriminations and politics. The huge undertaking goes by the ungainly acronym LA-RICS, short for the unwieldy full name: The Los Angeles Regional Interoperable Communications System.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2009 | Mike Musgrove
President Obama's decision last week to scrap a proposed ground-based missile defense system in Europe was bad news for Boeing Co. and other contractors associated with the plan, but it could be a boon for Raytheon Co. and other companies that produce ship-based systems, analysts said. Boeing had been slated to manage the construction and installation of 10 ground-based interceptors in Poland that were part of the Bush administration's original plans. "The losers are clear," said Phil Finnegan of the defense and aerospace research firm Teal Group.
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